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Author Topic: Death Penalty Methods, State by State.  (Read 964 times)

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Offline Jacques

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Death Penalty Methods, State by State.
« on: January 21, 2010, 09:33:23 PM »
The death penalty laws in each state and the District
of Columbia. Six
states with the death penalty have not had an
execution since 1976:
Connecticut, Kansas, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New
York and South Dakota.

ALABAMA - Lethal injection unless inmate requests
electrocution.

ALASKA - No death penalty.

ARIZONA - Lethal injection for those sentenced after
Nov. 15, 1992; others
may select injection or lethal gas.

ARKANSAS - Lethal injection for those whose offense
occurred after July 4,
1983; others may select injection or electrocution.

CALIFORNIA - Lethal injection unless inmate requests
gas.

COLORADO - Lethal injection.

CONNECTICUT - Lethal injection.

DELAWARE - Lethal injection.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA - No death penalty.

FLORIDA - Inmate may select lethal injection or
electrocution.

GEORGIA - Lethal injection.

HAWAII - No death penalty.

IDAHO - Firing squad if lethal injection is
"impractical."

ILLINOIS - Lethal injection; electrocution authorized
if injection is ever
held to be unconstitutional.

INDIANA - Lethal injection.

IOWA - No death penalty.

KANSAS - Lethal injection.

KENTUCKY - Lethal injection for those convicted after
March 31, 1998;
others may select lethal injection or electrocution.

LOUISIANA - Lethal injection.

MAINE - No death penalty.

MARYLAND - Lethal injection for those whose offense
occurred on or after
March 25, 1994; others may select injection or gas.

MASSACHUSETTS - No death penalty.

MICHIGAN - No death penalty.

MINNESOTA - No death penalty.

MISSISSIPPI - Lethal injection.

MISSOURI - Lethal injection or lethal gas; statute
leaves unclear whether
decision to be made by inmate or director of state
Department of
Corrections.

MONTANA - Lethal injection.

NEBRASKA - Electrocution.

NEVADA - Lethal injection.

NEW HAMPSHIRE - Hanging only if lethal injection
cannot be given.

NEW JERSEY - Lethal injection.

NEW MEXICO - Lethal injection.

NEW YORK - Lethal injection.

NORTH CAROLINA - Lethal injection.

NORTH DAKOTA - No death penalty.

OHIO - Lethal injection.

OKLAHOMA - Electrocution if lethal injection is ever
held to be
unconstitutional; firing squad if both injection and
electrocution are
held unconstitutional.

OREGON - Lethal injection.

PENNSYLVANIA - Lethal injection.

RHODE ISLAND - No death penalty.

SOUTH CAROLINA - Inmate may select lethal injection or
electrocution.

SOUTH DAKOTA - Lethal injection.

TENNESSEE - Lethal injection for those sentenced after
Jan. 1, 1999;
others may select electric chair or injection.

TEXAS - Lethal injection.

UTAH - Lethal injection; firing squad available to
inmates who chose it
prior to passage of legislation this year banning the
practice.

VERMONT - No death penalty.

VIRGINIA - Inmate may select lethal injection or
electrocution.

WASHINGTON - Lethal injection unless inmate requests
hanging.

WEST VIRGINIA - No death penalty.

WISCONSIN - No death penalty.

WYOMING - Lethal gas if lethal injection is ever held
to be
unconstitutional.

Best

Jacques
"If you can't explain it to a six year old, you don't understand it yourself." Albert Einstein

heidi salazar

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Re: Death Penalty Methods, State by State.
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2010, 10:04:03 PM »
Awesome post Jacques!! I actually added it to my favorites.

Side note on April 1, 2009, a bill to eliminate firing squad as a method of execution in Idaho was enacted, and took effect July 1, 2009.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Execution_by_firing_squad




Offline Moh

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Re: Death Penalty Methods, State by State.
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2010, 03:16:02 AM »
Below is a list that is up to date and actually has a source. However, unlike a certain other person, I certainly don't claim authorship of the information below.

Alabama   Effective 7/1/02, lethal injection will be administered unless the inmate requests electrocution.

Arizona   Authorizes lethal injection for persons sentenced after 11/15/92; those sentenced before that date may select lethal injection or lethal gas.

Arkansas   Authorizes lethal injection for persons whose offense occurred on or after 7/4/83; those who committed their offense before that date may select lethal injection or electrocution.

California   Provides that lethal injection be administered unless the inmate requests lethal gas.

Colorado   Lethal injection is the sole method.

Connecticut   Lethal injection is the sole method.

Delaware   Lethal Injection is the sole method. Hanging was an alternative for those whose offense occurred prior to 6/13/86, but as of July 2003 no inmates on death row were eligible to choose this alternative and Delaware dismantled its gallows.

Florida   Allows prisoners to choose between lethal injection and electrocution

Georgia   Lethal injection is the sole method. (On October 5, 2001, the Georgia Supreme Court held that the electric chair was cruel and unusual punishment and struck down the state's use of the method)

Idaho   Lethal injection is the sole method as of July 1, 2009.

Illinois   Lethal injection is the state's method. However, it authorizes electrocution if lethal injection is ever held to be unconstitutional.

Indiana   Lethal injection is the sole method.

Kansas   Lethal injection is the sole method.

Kentucky   Authorizes lethal injection for those convicted after March 31, 1998; those who committed the offense before that date may select lethal injection or electrocution

Louisiana   Lethal injection is the sole method.

Maryland   Authorizes lethal injection for those who were sentenced for a capital offense on or after 3/25/94; those who were sentenced before that date could select lethal injection or lethal gas.

Mississippi   Lethal injection is the sole method.

Missouri   Authorizes lethal injection or lethal gas; the statute leaves unclear who decides what method to use, the inmate or the Director of the Missouri Department of Corrections.

Montana   Lethal injection is the sole method.

Nebraska   Electrocution was the sole method until the Nebraska Supreme Court ruled the method unconstitutional in February 2008. In May 2009, the Nebraska Legislature approved lethal injection.

Nevada   Lethal injection is the sole method.

New Hampshire   Authorizes hanging only if lethal injection cannot be given.

New Mexico   Lethal injection is the sole method. New Mexico abolished the death penalty in 2009. However, the act wasn't retroactive, leaving two people on the state's death row.

North Carolina   Lethal injection is the sole method.

Ohio   Lethal injection is the sole method.

Oklahoma   Authorizes electrocution if lethal injection is ever held to be unconstitutional and firing squad if both lethal injection and electrocution are held unconstitutional.

Oregon   Lethal injection is the sole method.

Pennsylvania   Lethal injection is the sole method.

South Carolina   Allows prisoners to choose between lethal injection and electrocution

South Dakota   Lethal injection is the sole method.

Tennessee   Authorizes lethal injection for those whose capital offense occurred after December 31, 1998; those who committed the offense before that date may select electrocution by written waiver.

Texas    Lethal injection is the sole method.

Utah   Authorizes firing squad if lethal injection is held unconstitutional. Inmates who selected execution by firing squad prior to May 3, 2004, may still be entitled to execution by that method.

Virginia   Allows prisoners to choose between lethal injection and electrocution

Washington   Provides that lethal injection be administered unless the inmate requests hanging.

Wyoming   Authorizes lethal gas if lethal injection is ever held to be unconstitutional.

U.S. Military   Lethal injection is the sole method

U.S. Government    The method of execution of federal prisoners for offenses under the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 is that of the state in which the conviction took place, pursuant to 18 USC 3596. If the state has no death penalty, the judge must choose a state with the death penalty for carrying out the execution. For offenses under the 1988 Drug Kingpin Law, the method of executions is lethal injection, pursuant to 28 CFR, Part 26.

(Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, Capital Punishment 2006; updated by DPIC)

http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/methods-execution