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Author Topic: Listing of North Carolina Death Row Inmates A - C  (Read 7924 times)

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Offline Jeff1857

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Listing of North Carolina Death Row Inmates A - C
« on: May 24, 2009, 07:54:55 PM »
Jathiya Al-Bayyinah aka Kerry Moore
On the morning of March 6, 1998, 71-year-old Simon Wilford Brown, Jr. arrived at his wholesale grocery supply business in Mocksville, North Carolina. A few minutes later, he struggled with an assailant and suffered a single stab wound to the right side of his chest. The blow punctured his lung. The pathologist could not say whether the wound was inflicted deliberately or accidentally.
Mr. Brown bled from the chest, lost consciousness within moments, and was hospitalized. He remained in a coma. Complications from the wound included pneumonia and organ failure. Nine days after the stabbing, the family decided to remove life support. Mr. Brown died shortly thereafter. In the moments before he lost consciousness, Mr. Brown described the assailant as a "Black guy. … he was in here yesterday. … Dark clothing. I think I cashed his check esterday. … But, I'm not positive." He said he did not see the weapon. He said the assailant "come up from behind." The state's theory was that Jathiyah Al Bayyinah committed premeditated and deliberate murder and felony murder in the course of attempted robbery.

Scott Allen
Before his 1998 escape from a North Carolina Department of Corrections work release program in which he was serving a sentence for numerous felony breaking or entering and felony larceny convictions, Scott Allen met Vanessa Smith and they became romantically involved.
Immediately following Allen’s escape, he met Smith in a parking lot, and the couple began moving around from hotel to hotel through out the country, which Smith paid for with proceeds from a large settlement arising from her father’s death. The couple returned to North Carolina in the summer of 1999. Allen had false identification under the name of Byron Johnson, which he used when he moved into a mobile home near Badin Lake.  In addition to Allen and Smith, Robert Johnson, Christopher Gailey, and Danny Lanier and his family resided in the mobile home. Christopher Gailey and Allen were long-time friends, but Smith never considered Gailey a friend. Life at the mobile home consisted of heavy partying, drinking, and drug abuse. Much of the drugs were provided by Gailey. On July 9, 1999, the day of the murder, Allen told Smith and Gailey he had stashed some firearms in a cabin in the Uwharrie Forest, and they should get them and sell them for drugs. The three arrived that evening at the Uwharrie Forest, after which they entered the forest and walked for what Smith described as at least an hour. Smith smoked marijuana while Allen and Gailey used cocaine. As they walked single file down a very narrow trail, fired a shotgun twice, first delivering a heavy buckshot blast into Gailey’s back, and then firing lighter birdshot into Gailey’s knee.  Smith testified that she and defendant then went to the nearby cabin to sit and wait for Gailey to die. According to Smith’s testimony, for seven to eight hours after defendant shot Gailey, he would creep over on his stomach to Gailey’s body to throw rocks at him to discover if he would make a noise. During this waiting period, defendant told Smith that Gailey would never call her a “bitch” again and that he could not believe Gailey turned on him and was going to “rat him off” by reporting his location to the authorities. Christopher Gailey died as a result of his wounds.

Billy Raymond Anderson
Billy Raymond Anderson was indicted on July 21, 1998, for the first-degree murder and first-degree rape of Lorraine Watson. At trial evidence showed that Anderson and Lorraine Watson were engaged to be married and that on the morning of July 7, 1998, Watson informed Anderson that she wanted to break off the engagement. She also told Anderson, who had been living in a mobile home on her parents' property, that she wanted him to move back to Fayetteville with his family. Later that evening, while the couple was together at their part-time job, Anderson pleaded Lorraine not to terminate their relationship, but she remained adamant about the breakup. Infuriated, Anderson pulled out a knife and began to rape Watson then attacked her with the knife, cutting her numerous times. He then grabbed an electrical cord and tied the cord around the victim's neck. He also wrapped electrical cords around her left arm and leg.
The following morning, an employee of the facility discovered Watson lying on the floor of one of the examination rooms. She was unclothed and the cord around her neck suspended her head off the floor. During an autopsy the medical examiner noted at least 75 knife wounds. He concluded that none of these wounds were fatal and that Watson died by asphyxiation.
On July 9, 1998, Anderson turned himself in to the police and gave a statement confessing to the murder.

William "Todd" Anthony
William Todd Anthony, sentenced to death June 3, 1999, for killing his estranged wife, Sandy Anthony, on April 16, 1997. Her father also was shot in the domestic dispute.

Randy I. Atkins
Randy Lynn Atkins was indicted on April 12, 1993, for first-degree sexual offense and first-degree murder of his 8-month-old son, Lyle James Atkins. On November 18, 1993, Atkins plead guilty to the first-degree murder charge in a plea deal if the State would dismiss the sexual offense charge. Atkins was found guilty of the murder of his infant son and sentenced to death.

Quntez Martinez Augustine
Quintel Augustine was found guilty of shooting Officer Roy Turner to death on November 29, 2001.

Hassan Bacote
Sentenced to Death 4/09. Bacote was charged in February 2007 in the death Anthony Surles, 18, during what police said was a robbery attempt at a home on Hunting Drive in Selma. Surles was a student at Smithfield Selma High School. Marshals have also charged Jeffrey Lamont Evans, 32, and Antwain Nathaniel Groves in the crime.

John Scott Badgett
On or about November 20, 2002, Badgett went to the Kizer's house looking for a place to spend the night. Kizer had allowed Badgett and another friend to stay the night at his home a few weeks earlier. On this night, Kizer again allowed Badgett to stay the night. At some point in the evening Kizer, who suffered from a mental disability, began complaining to Badgett about his next-door neighbors. He explained to Badgett his belief that the police had failed to respond adequately to complaints he had made against the neighbors. Kizer began yelling about “workers of iniquity” and pointing his finger at Badgett. Badgett argued briefly with Kizer, then opened a folding pocketknife and stabbed him in the neck. The stabbing severed Kizer's right carotid artery and damaged his trachea, Adam's apple, and windpipe. As blood squirted from his neck, Kizer ran to a telephone in his kitchen. Badgett followed Kizer into the kitchen and slashed Kizer's right arm with the pocketknife, leaving a deep wound. Kizer picked up the telephone to call for help, but Badgett pushed him away from the phone, knocking him to the floor. Kizer died within a few minutes. Once Kizer was dead, Badgett stole Kizer's wallet containing his driver's license and five dollars in cash. Badgett then ransacked Kizer's house twice, stealing a substantial amount of cash from a set of envelopes in Kizer's bedroom, as well as a flashlight and Kizer's truck which later linked him to the murder and his arrest. Badgett eventually gave police a signed confession, which described the details of the murder.
Sentenced to death in Randolph County, North Carolina
Date of crime: 11/20/02
Badgett confessed to killing 55-year-old, Grover Kiser, by stabbing him in the neck and stealing from the victim. Badgett claimed he killed Kiser in self-defense, after Kiser threatened him. The defense argued Kiser had a history of mental illness. In mitigation, the defense claimed Badgett had a difficult childhood, and saw his grandfather kill his father and was abused by his stepfather. A psychiatrist testified Badgett had a rare condition called, intermittent explosive disorder. Badgett had a history of assaults dating back to 1987.

Terry Ball
Terry Ball was indicted October 26, 1993, for assault with a deadly weapon with intent to kill inflicting serious bodily injury, two counts of robbery with a dangerous weapon, first-degree burglary, and for the first-degree murder of Laura Krantz. According to the state's evidence Reverend Tony Krantz was awakened by the doorbell at approximately four o'clock in the morning June 17, 1993. Reverend Krantz testified that when he opened the door, he asked Terry Ball how he was doing, and Ball replied, "not so well." Terry Ball further stated, "You told me that if I ever needed somebody to talk to that you would be there." Reverend Krantz acknowledged that he had made such a statement and let Terry Ball in the house. Inside the house, Ball stabbed Krantz in the side, and about the same time, his wife Laura, saw what as happening and screamed, then was chased by Ball through the house. Reverend Krantz testified that he saw his wife run down the hall and that he heard a door slam and thought that his wife was safe. He then went to the telephone and dialed 911. After making the call to 911, Reverend Krantz ran out the back door and went to a neighbor's home. Laura Krantz died as a result of more than twenty stab wounds to her head and extremities. Terry Ball presented no evidence during the guilt/innocence phase of the trial.

Iziah Barden
Defendant was indicted for first-degree murder and robbery with a dangerous weapon.
According to trial records, March 27, 1998, Iziah Barden beat to death co-worker, Felipe Resendix, and robbed him of money so he could purchase crack cocaine.

William Barnes
Defendants William Leroy Barnes, Robert Lewis Blakney, and Frank Junior Chambers were tried jointly and capitally upon indictments charging them each with two counts of first-degree murder, two counts of robbery with a dangerous weapon, and one count of first-degree burglary in connection with the killings of B.P. and Ruby Tutterow. The jury returned verdicts finding all three defendants guilty of both counts of first-degree murder on the theory of premeditation and deliberation as well as under the felony murder rule. The felonies the jury relied upon in finding defendants guilty of felony murder were burglary and both counts of armed robbery. Following a capital sentencing proceeding pursuant to N.C.G.S. § 15A-2000, the jury recommended that defendants Barnes and Chambers be sentenced to death for each murder and that defendant Blakney be sentenced to a mandatory term of life imprisonment for each murder. The trial court accordingly sentenced defendants Barnes and Chambers to death for the first-degree murders and sentenced defendant Blakney to two terms of life imprisonment. Defendants were also each sentenced to two terms of forty years' imprisonment for armed robbery and a term of forty years' imprisonment for burglary. All sentences are to be served consecutively. Defendants appeal to this Court as a matter of right from the judgments and respective sentences of death and life imprisonment for the first-degree murders. We allowed their motions to bypass the Court of Appeals on their appeal of the judgments entered for the offenses of armed robbery and burglary. For the reasons set forth in this opinion, we conclude that defendants received a fair trial, free from prejudicial error, and that the respective death and life sentences imposed by the trial court must stand.
While we discuss the relevant evidence in detail where necessary in the individual assignments of error, a brief synopsis of the evidence introduced at trial is as follows: On 29 October 1992, all three defendants went to the Salisbury home of B.P. and Ruby Tutterow to rob the Tutterows. Defendant Chambers had met B.P. while incarcerated at the Rowan County jail, where B.P. cooked part-time and served as a deputy sheriff. B.P. was known to carry significant amounts of money in his wallet and had given defendant Chambers money to buy cigarettes and food while Chambers was in jail. Chambers was released from jail on the afternoon of 29 October, and shortly thereafter met up with defendant Blakney and Antonio Mason at a nearby convenience store. Chambers told Blakney and Mason that he had been released from jail without any money and that he knew someone who lived nearby who had plenty of money. Chambers said that he was willing to kill someone if it was necessary to get some money. After being unable to convince Mason to cooperate in their efforts, Chambers and Blakney joined up with defendant Barnes, who was at that time in the convenience store parking lot. Chambers, Blakney, and Barnes then went with others to the apartment of Cynthia Gwen, where the three defendants talked together about "mak[ing] a lick," or robbing someone. Barnes got into an argument with another man while at Gwen's apartment, and Gwen asked him to leave. The three defendants then left Gwen's apartment together around 10:00 p.m. Patricia Miller was speaking with B.P. Tutterow on the phone around 10:00 p.m. that evening when she heard a commotion on the line and the phone went dead. After attempting to reach the Tutterows several times, Miller telephoned the police around 11:30 p.m. Salisbury police officers arrived at the Tutterow home around 12:30 a.m. on 30 October and found the Tutterows dead and the house ransacked. The Tutterows' daughters determined that several things were missing from their parents' home including B.P.'s .357 Magnum pistol and a .38-caliber revolver, B.P.'s gold wedding band and gold watch, several items of jewelry, two bank bags that usually contained cash, and a bag of antique coins including some Susan B. Anthony dollars and Kennedy half-dollars. Physical evidence in the home tied defendants Blakney and Chambers to the crime. The DNA profile of a sample drawn from one cigarette butt found in the house matched that of Chambers, and the profile on another butt matched that of Blakney. A latent fingerprint on a money box found in one bedroom matched Chambers' left middle finger. A print obtained from another money box matched that of Blakney's left palm. Around 11:00 p.m. on the night of the murders, Barnes, Blakney, and Chambers went to the apartment where Antonio, Sharon, and Valerie Mason lived. Blakney and Chambers told Sharon that they would pay her for the use of her car to go to Kannapolis to dispose of some guns. Although Sharon refused, Blakney gave the two women around twenty to forty dollars and gave Valerie a wedding band with one small diamond. When Valerie asked Blakney where he got the ring, he replied that "we f----- up a police" and that it was a "three-person secret." Blakney further told Valerie that he, Barnes, and Chambers had some jewelry and guns. Barnes and Chambers each then showed Valerie and Sharon a gun. Defendants then left with Antonio to buy drugs. They bought about sixty dollars worth of crack at a nearby apartment.

Jeffrey Lee Barrett
Jeffrey Lee Barrett, was found guilty of two counts of first-degree murder and one count of robbery with a dangerous weapon. Court records show that on August, 5, 1989, Barrett shot to death and robbed brothers Mitchell and Michael Turner after attempting to sell them $17,000 in fake cocaine.

Bryan Christopher Bell
On 2 October 2000, defendant was indicted for the first-degree murder of Elleze Thornton Kennedy. On 27 November 2000, defendant was indicted on additional charges of first- degree kidnapping and burning of personal property. He was tried capitally to a jury at the 9 July 2001 Special Criminal Session of Superior Court, Onslow County, the Honorable Jay D. Hockenburypresiding. The jury found defendant guilty of first-degree murder based on malice, premeditation, and deliberation as well as felony murder and, following a capital sentencing proceeding, recommended that defendant be sentenced to death. Judge Hockenbury sentenced defendant accordingly. The jury also found defendant guilty of first-degree kidnapping and burning of personal property. Judge Hockenbury sentenced defendant to consecutive prison terms of 133 months to 169 months for the kidnapping conviction and 11 to 14 months for the burning of personal property conviction. Defendant appeals his conviction and death sentence for first-degree murder to this Court.
The evidence at trial tended to show that on 3 January 2000, defendant met two friends, Antwaun Sims and Chad Williams, at a game room in Newton Grove. At defendant's request, Williams brought a BB gun with him to Newton Grove and gave it to defendant upon arrival at the game room. After spending some time at the game room, defendant, Sims, and Williams left for the Newton Grove traffic circle where they “hung out,” smoked marijuana, and drank brandy. Defendant told Sims and Williams that he wanted to steal a car so that he could leave town, and Sims said he was “down for whatever.” At that point, defendant spotted Elleze Kennedy leaving Hardee's, and he said, “I want to rob the lady for her Cadillac.”

Norfolk Junior Best
Norfolk ``Fuzzy`` Junior Best, 37, was sentenced to death in 1991 for robbing Leslie and Gertrude Baldwin before stabbing and bludgeoning them to death. He also raped Gertrude Baldwin.

Archie Billings
Billings and Robert Jackson worked together on a dairy farm in Caswell County. On July 7, 1995, Billings broke into Jackson's trailer when he knew Jackson would be working. He stabbed Jackson's son, then 13-year-old Bobby, repeatedly then raped 11-year-old Amy in her father's bedroom.
After the rape Billings again stabbed Bobby and Amy tried to escape by running through a bean field. Billings, however, caught up to her, stabbed her in throat, and raped her again.
Bobby survived 23 stab wounds and was able to call police and identify Billings as the attacker.
Amy was found dead in the field the following morning.

Roger Blakeney
On 15 April 1996, Blakeney, 33, broke into his mother’s home for the purpose of stealing. Blakeney stole three of his mother’s rings, a brown leather pouch, approximately $4.00 in change, a small herringbone chain, and his mother’s savings account deposit book.
While Blakeney was in the house, Callie Washington Huntley, age 76, drove behind the house. Huntley had lived with Blakeney’s mother for over 20 years. Blakeney hid in a small room behind the refrigerator as the Huntley entered the house. According to Blakeney’s confession, which was admitted into evidence at trial, Blakeney entered the kitchen, and the two began arguing. Blakeney told authorities that he turned to leave, but the Huntley grabbed him. Blakeney charged at Huntley, grabbed and wrestled a .22-caliber revolver out of Huntley’s hand, and hit Huntley in the back of the head with the butt of the gun. Huntley fell facedown on the kitchen floor and started bleeding. According to Blakeney, after some additional period of physical struggle, a metal can of kerosene was accidentally spilled. Blakeney also claimed that a cigarette he was smoking fell out of his mouth at some time during the struggle. According to Blakeney, at some point, he pulled Huntley off the floor, sat him in a chair, and wrapped an electrical cord around his hands and legs. Blakeney then removed $78.00 from the Huntley’s wallet, then left the house. Firefighters arrived at the scene and discovered the Huntley’s wire-bound body as they fought the fire. In contrast to Blakeney’s statement, all accidental causes were eliminated during the investigation. The investigation revealed traces of kerosene on samples taken from the couch in the den and on the Huntley’s clothing. The autopsy on Huntley's body revealed that 75 percent of the his skin was charred. It was also observed that the Huntley had received a wound to the back and a wound to the left temporal area of the head, which resulted in injury to the brain. The cause of death was carbon monoxide poisoning produced by the fire.

Charles Bond
Charles Phillips Bond was convicted on March 15, 1995, of the first-degree murder of Wayne Leon Thomas, robbery with a dangerous weapon, and two counts of first-degree kidnapping.

Shawn Bonnett
Shawn Derrick Bonnett was found guilty of first-degree murder of Robert Hardison and for robbery with a dangerous weapon. According to court records, on January 4, 1996, Bonnett and codefendants, Christopher Moore, Richard Smith, and Jimmy Smith, drove specifically to Hardison's General Merchandise to rob it. Prior to the actual robbery the group discussed that they would have to "smoke" the owner Robert Hardison.
At about 7:30 p.m. they pulled into the store's parking lot, and Bonnett handed a gun to Jimmy Smith. Richard Smith stayed in the car. Moore and Jimmy Smith went to the beer cooler while Bonnett stood next to the counter. Smith placed a beer on the counter and when Robert Hardison approached in order to ring up the sale, Smith pulled out the gun and shot Hardison three or four times, killing him. Moore then took the Hardison's gun from his back pocket and took the money box. Later in the evening the four divided up the money in a motel room.

Nathan Bowie
Nathan Bowie was found guilty on two counts of first-degree murder. According to the court records. Bowie and William Bowie, with their hands behind their backs, approached the two victims who were outside visiting friends. The Bowies began shooting and Nelson Shuford and Calvin Wilson were killed.

William Bowie
On May 23, 1991, at around 11:00 p.m., William Barfield Bowie and Rochelle Bowie approached Nelson Shuford and Calvin Wilson in the street. An argument ensued between Rochelle and Shuford. Seeing acquaintances of Shuford's gathering, William and Rochelle walked away from the argument. They then heard shots fired from behind them. Rochelle believed that Shuford and Wilson were shooting at her, but in fact Wilson was shooting into the air. William and Rochelle returned to Rochelle's home, where William attempted to contact his nephew, Nathan Bowie. Reaching Bowie's mother by telephone, William left a message for Bowie, explaining what had transpired and asking Bowie to meet him at Rochelle's residence as soon as possible. Shortly thereafter, Bowie, then 24 old, arrived, carrying a .45 firearm. Early the next morning, Bowie and William left Rochelle's house. Around 8:00 a.m., Bowie was seen pounding on the front door of Shuford's home, calling for Shuford to come out, claiming to be "Neal" from Charlotte. Finding Shuford not at home, Bowie left, angry and cursing, and sped away in his truck. Three witnesses, including two who knew Bowie from high school, identified Bowie as the man banging on Shuford's door. Approximately two hours later, Shuford and Wilson were outside standing and socializing with four friends. According to multiple eyewitnesses, Bowie and William appeared from behind a building and approached the group and began firing, killing Shuford and Wilson.
Later forensics revealed that Shuford had been shot once in the chest by a large-caliber bullet, dying instantly. Wilson was shot in the chest with a small-caliber bullet and in the head with a large-caliber bullet. One of the gunshot wounds was delivered after Wilson was already on the ground suffering from the other. Wilson died several days later from the head wound. Neither victim was armed at the time of the shootings, though Wilson's gun was some distance away in the trunk of his car. Immediately after the killings, Bowie and William fled to Philadelphia, where they were soon apprehended and charged with the murders.

Terrance Bowman aka Terrance Taylor
The defendant was indicted on 20 May 1996 for two counts of first-degree murder. Defendant was tried capitally to a jury at the 3 February 1997 Criminal Session of Superior Court, Lenoir County, the Honorable Louis B. Meyer presiding. The jury found defendant guilty of both counts of first-degree murder on the basis of premeditation and deliberation. Following a capital sentencing proceeding, the jury recommended sentences of death as to each murder conviction. On 18 February 1997, the trial court sentenced defendant to two separate sentences of death, one for each of the two convictions for first-degree murder.
Defendant got back into the car and told Taylor to "forget them country boys. They should not have robbed me." At defendant's request, James drove the Mercedes Benz to Yashica Miller's house located in the Richard Green Apartments. On the way to Miller's apartment, Taylor repeatedly asked defendant why he had to do it, and defendant answered that the victims should not have robbed him. Defendant also stated that Smith and Jones "got it flatbush style in the head." Victims: Clarence Jones and Michael Smith

Michael Jerome Braxton
Defendant Michael Jerome Braxton was indicted on 30 September 1996 for first-degree murder in the killing of victim Dwayne Maurice Caldwell. Defendant was tried capitally and found guilty of first-degree murder on the basis of premeditation and deliberation. Following a capital sentencing proceeding, the jury recommended the sentence of death for the murder; and the trial court entered judgment accordingly.

Robert Brewington
On 30 June 1997, defendant was indicted for two counts of first-degree murder, two counts of conspiracy to commit first-degree murder, one count of conspiracy to commit first-degree burglary, one count of conspiracy to commit first-degree arson, and one count of first-degree arson. Defendant was tried capitally at the 4 August 1998 Special Criminal Session of Superior Court, Harnett County. During the course of the trial, the charges of conspiracy to commit first-degree burglary and conspiracy to commit first-degree arson were dismissed. The jury subsequently found defendant guilty of first-degree arson, both counts of conspiracy to commit first-degree murder, and both counts of first-degree murder on the basis of premeditation and deliberation and under the felony murder rule. Following a capital sentencing proceeding, the jury recommended sentences of death as to each murder conviction. On 28 August 1998, the trial court sentenced defendant to two separate sentences of death, one for each of the two convictions for first-degree murder. The trial court also sentenced defendant to a sentence of 157 to 198 months' imprisonment for the two conspiracy to commit murder convictions and to a sentence of 64 to 86 months' imprisonment for the arson conviction. On 21 April 1997, defendant took out two life insurance policies from Home Beneficial Life Insurance Company. One policy was on defendant's brother, Patrick Brewington, for $75,000. The other policy was on Patrick's son, Brian, for $58,552. Defendant forged Patrick's signature on both policies and named himself as the beneficiary on both. On 29 May 1997, Lee and defendant made a deposit on a lot and mobile home, but the mortgage company refused to approve their loan. Brian Brewington and his great-grandmother, Frances Brewington, were found burned to death June 12, 1997, in the front bedroom of Ms. Brewington's frame farmhouse near Dunn.
VERDICT
A jury has decided that Robert Brewington deserves to die for the arson murders of Brian and his great-grandmother, Frances Cordella Brewington.  The jury, which deliberated for about six hours also recommended two consecutive life sentences for Brewington's co-defendant, Michael McKeithan, 18.  Vera Sue Lee was found guilty of first-degree murder by another jury and received a sentence of life without parole. 
Evidence at both trials indicated that Lee and Brewington plotted the murders together, then tried on several occasions to coerce friends into carrying out the killings. According to testimony, Lee ran into McKeithan the night before the murders and offered to pay him $1,000 to help her set the fire.  Prosecutors contended that Lee and McKeithan sneaked into the house through a screen door Robert Brewington had left unlocked for them, then poured gasoline in the bedroom where the victims were sleeping.  They maintained that Lee lit the fire with a flaming rag.  "I am certainly frustrated with the result in Vera's case. But that's the way our system works," said the prosecutor, who had hoped to send her to death row. 
"I can understand the verdicts with regard to McKeithan because he was brought into the conspiracy so late, and because of his age, his limited intelligence and impoverished background. The jury had more mitigating circumstances." 

Paul A. Brown
Paul Anthony Brown, who was sentenced to death for murdering his former girlfriend and a toddler in her care in 1996 in Goldsboro, wants to get off death row.
Judge Howard Manning, who conducted Brown's trial in 1998 and his sentencing hearing in 2000, held a two-day hearing this week in Wayne County Superior Court on Brown's motion for relief.
Victims, Latashonette "Tasha" Cox and a toddler

George C. Buckner
George Cale Buckner, was sentenced to death Oct. 8, 1993, for shooting to death his employer, Eddie Dow on Feb. 20, 1992.

Rayford Lewis Burke
Convicted in 1993 in Iredell County. About three months after he was acquitted in a 1991 murder, he shot and killed the prosecution's main witness against him, Timothy Morrison.

John Edward Burr
Burr was convicted of the 1991 murder of four-month-old Susie O’Daniel in Alamance County.  Judge Trevor Sharp has ordered a new trial due to evidence that O’Daniel was not murdered at all; instead she died as the result of an accident in which Burr was not even involved.

Richard Cagle
Convicted and sentenced to Death in the 1993 Murder of Dennis Craig House.
According to Jones' testimony, he waited in the bathroom while Cagle returned to the living room. When Jones subsequently entered the living room, he saw Cagle lying on the couch and House performing oral sex on Cagle. Cagle reached out to grab Jones by the belt, and Jones stabbed House in the back once. Jones pulled the knife out and dropped it on the ground, and Cagle picked it up. House said, "Why are you guys doing this? I'll give you anything." House then lunged and grabbed Jones, and Scott began punching House in the head. Jones pulled away from House. Then Cagle stabbed House three or four times in the chest and dropped the knife on the ground. Scott tried to hit House with a bowling ball. While Jones, Scott, and House were wrestling, Cagle hit House with something that looked like either a fireplace poker or a pool cue, according to the testimony. Next, Cagle, Scott, and Jones ran toward the back room, where Cagle said, "Go finish him, go kill him." Cagle, Scott, and Jones ran out the front door, with Jones picking up the knife as he ran through the living room. The only item they took from House's home was a camera that Cagle picked up.

House ran to the home of his neighbor, Roger Ayscue, and knocked on the door. When Ayscue let him in, House collapsed and said, "Roger, they are trying to kill me." Ayscue looked out his window and saw Cagle and Scott leaving House's trailer. House ultimately died from stab wounds in the chest.
While fleeing, Cagle, Jones, and Scott discussed an alibi. They decided to tell police that they got in a fight at a keg party and that House left with another man. Shortly after leaving the murder scene, they reached a house and knocked on the door. Elizabeth Hales answered the door, and Cagle asked to use her phone to call a cab because their car had broken down. Hales refused, but told them she would call a cab for them. Hales called a cab company and the police. Cagle, Jones, and Scott then began walking down the road. A deputy sheriff responding to Hales' call spotted them and asked them what had happened. Cagle said they had been to a keg party, and their car had broken down. Cagle said the blood on his pants was from a fight at the keg party. The deputy sheriff then arrested Cagle, Jones, and Scott.

Eric L. Call
On 9 October 1995, defendant was indicted for the first- degree murder of Macedonio Hernandez Gervacio (the victim). On 18 March 1996, defendant was indicted for robbery with a dangerous weapon, first-degree kidnapping, and assault with a deadly weapon with intent to kill inflicting serious injury. Defendant was tried capitally before a jury at the 15 July 1996 Criminal Session of Superior Court, Ashe County. The jury found defendant guilty of all charges, specifically finding defendant guilty of first-degree murder both on the basis of premeditation and deliberation and under the felony murder rule. Following a capital sentencing proceeding, the jury recommended a sentence of death for the first-degree murder.

James A. Campbell
Petitioner James Campbell was convicted by a North Carolina jury of first-degree murder, two counts of first-degree rape, kidnapping, armed robbery, and the burning of personal property. He was sentenced to death for the murder conviction. On September 11, 1992, the body of Katherine Price was found in a field in Rowan County, North Carolina. Price had sustained twenty-two knife wounds to her neck. Five days later, North Carolina police officers arrested James Campbell for the murder. He confessed, and directed the police to various pieces of physical evidence, including the knife used to kill Price.

Terrance Campbell
Defendant Terrance Durrell Campbell was indicted on 21 February 2000 for first-degree murder and robbery with a dangerous weapon of “Buddy” William Hall. Defendant was tried
capitally and found guilty of first-degree murder based on malice, premeditation and deliberation and under the felony murder rule, with robbery as the underlying felony. After a
capital sentencing hearing, the jury recommended that defendant be sentenced to death; and the trial court entered judgment accordingly.

Shan E. Carter
On 24 February 1997, Shan Carter (defendant) was indicted for the first-degree murders of Tyrone Baker and Demetrius Greene. He was also subsequently indicted for discharging a firearm into occupied property, in violation of N.C.G.S. § 14-34.1, and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon, in violation of N.C.G.S. § 14-415.1. Defendant was tried capitally at the 5 February 2001 session of Superior Court, New Hanover County. The jury found defendant guilty on all counts. Defendant's conviction of the first-degree murder of Baker wasbased on a theory of premeditation and deliberation. Defendant's conviction of the first-degree murder of Greene was based on a theory of premeditation and deliberation under the doctrine of transferred intent, and was also based on the felony murder rule with Baker's murder serving as the underlying felony. Following a capital sentencing proceeding, the jury recommended a sentence of death for each murder.

Frank Chambers
Defendants William Leroy Barnes, Robert Lewis Blakney, and Frank Junior Chambers were tried jointly and capitally upon indictments charging them each with two counts of first-degree murder, two counts of robbery with a dangerous weapon, and one count of first-degree burglary in connection with the killings of B.P. and Ruby Tutterow. The jury returned verdicts finding all three defendants guilty of both counts of first-degree murder on the theory of premeditation and deliberation as well as under the felony murder rule. The felonies the jury relied upon in finding defendants guilty of felony murder were burglary and both counts of armed robbery. Following a capital sentencing proceeding pursuant to N.C.G.S. § 15A-2000, the jury recommended that defendants Barnes and Chambers be sentenced to death for each murder and that defendant Blakney be sentenced to a mandatory term of life imprisonment for each murder. The trial court accordingly sentenced defendants Barnes and Chambers to death for the first-degree murders and sentenced defendant Blakney to two terms of life imprisonment. Defendants were also each sentenced to two terms of forty years' imprisonment for armed robbery and a term of forty years' imprisonment for burglary. All sentences are to be served consecutively. Defendants appeal to this Court as a matter of right from the judgments and respective sentences of death and life imprisonment for the first-degree murders. We allowed their motions to bypass the Court of Appeals on their appeal of the judgments entered for the offenses of armed robbery and burglary. For the reasons set forth in this opinion, we conclude that defendants received a fair trial, free from prejudicial error, and that the respective death and life sentences imposed by the trial court must stand.
While we discuss the relevant evidence in detail where necessary in the individual assignments of error, a brief synopsis of the evidence introduced at trial is as follows: On 29 October 1992, all three defendants went to the Salisbury home of B.P. and Ruby Tutterow to rob the Tutterows. Defendant Chambers had met B.P. while incarcerated at the Rowan County jail, where B.P. cooked part-time and served as a deputy sheriff. B.P. was known to carry significant amounts of money in his wallet and had given defendant Chambers money to buy cigarettes and food while Chambers was in jail. Chambers was released from jail on the afternoon of 29 October, and shortly thereafter met up with defendant Blakney and Antonio Mason at a nearby convenience store. Chambers told Blakney and Mason that he had been released from jail without any money and that he knew someone who lived nearby who had plenty of money. Chambers said that he was willing to kill someone if it was necessary to get some money. After being unable to convince Mason to cooperate in their efforts, Chambers and Blakney joined up with defendant Barnes, who was at that time in the convenience store parking lot. Chambers, Blakney, and Barnes then went with others to the apartment of Cynthia Gwen, where the three defendants talked together about "mak[ing] a lick," or robbing someone. Barnes got into an argument with another man while at Gwen's apartment, and Gwen asked him to leave. The three defendants then left Gwen's apartment together around 10:00 p.m. Patricia Miller was speaking with B.P. Tutterow on the phone around 10:00 p.m. that evening when she heard a commotion on the line and the phone went dead. After attempting to reach the Tutterows several times, Miller telephoned the police around 11:30 p.m. Salisbury police officers arrived at the Tutterow home around 12:30 a.m. on 30 October and found the Tutterows dead and the house ransacked. The Tutterows' daughters determined that several things were missing from their parents' home including B.P.'s .357 Magnum pistol and a .38-caliber revolver, B.P.'s gold wedding band and gold watch, several items of jewelry, two bank bags that usually contained cash, and a bag of antique coins including some Susan B. Anthony dollars and Kennedy half-dollars. Physical evidence in the home tied defendants Blakney and Chambers to the crime. The DNA profile of a sample drawn from one cigarette butt found in the house matched that of Chambers, and the profile on another butt matched that of Blakney. A latent fingerprint on a money box found in one bedroom matched Chambers' left middle finger. A print obtained from another money box matched that of Blakney's left palm. Around 11:00 p.m. on the night of the murders, Barnes, Blakney, and Chambers went to the apartment where Antonio, Sharon, and Valerie Mason lived. Blakney and Chambers told Sharon that they would pay her for the use of her car to go to Kannapolis to dispose of some guns. Although Sharon refused, Blakney gave the two women around twenty to forty dollars and gave Valerie a wedding band with one small diamond. When Valerie asked Blakney where he got the ring, he replied that "we f----- up a police" and that it was a "three-person secret." Blakney further told Valerie that he, Barnes, and Chambers had some jewelry and guns. Barnes and Chambers each then showed Valerie and Sharon a gun. Defendants then left with Antonio to buy drugs. They bought about sixty dollars worth of crack at a nearby apartment

Wade L. Cole
Wade Larry Cole, 52, was sentenced to death for the June 23, 1988 murder of his girlfriend, Theresa Graham, who had been stabbed more than 100 times and shot twice with a .22 caliber rifle.

Jerry W. Conner
Jerry Conner was scheduled to be executed in North Carolina on 12 May 2006. He was sentenced to death in 1991 for the armed robbery and murder of shopkeeper
Minh Rogers and the rape and murder of her 16-year-old daughter, Linda Rogers, on 18 August 1990. Executionn was stayed due to pending NC Lethal Injection Challenges.

Daniel Cummings Jr.
On May 23, 1994, Cummings was indicted in Brunswick County for the first degree murder of Burns Babson. On October 17, 1994, he was again indicted in Brunswick County for the related offenses of robbery with a dangerous weapon and assault with a deadly weapon with intent to kill.

Jerry Ray Cummings
Jerry Ray Cummings should die for killing a man in a dispute over a dog 11 years ago, a jury decided Tuesday.
The jury was the second to give Cummings the death penalty for the crime, but the first sentence was overturned.
On Tuesday, after the sentence was announced, Cummings denied murdering Jesse Ward, 76, at Ward's home near Maxton in 1986.

Paul Cummings
Paul Cummings is accused of murdering his neighbor, Jane Head, in 2002. On 4 October 2002, Paul Dewayne Cummings (defendant) stabbed his neighbor Jane Head (the victim) to death with her paring knife in her own home. Defendant then stole the victim's van and automated teller machine (ATM) card and used the ATM personal identification number (PIN) he had extracted from the victim before her death to withdraw $400 from her bank account. Defendant was convicted of robbery with a dangerous weapon and first-degree murder. The jury returned a binding recommendation of death for the first-degree murder conviction, and the trial court sentenced defendant accordingly. The trial court also sentenced defendant to a term of 117 to 150 months of active imprisonment for the robbery with a dangerous weapon conviction.