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Author Topic: Reasons why the Death Penalty does work!  (Read 38268 times)

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Offline Elric of Melnibone

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Re: Reasons why the Death Penalty does work!
« Reply #15 on: August 15, 2010, 02:55:26 PM »
"We should not kill people who kill people to show that killing is wrong" is the biggest crock of shyt i have ever read.  The Death Penalty does not deter killers, rather it is to teach us not to kill or this will happen to you.  It is too late for the killers and they should be executed as examples of what not to be.
You can lead an ass to water and if you fight long and hard, you can make it drink.  But at the end of the day, after all the fighting, it is still an ass.

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Offline executioner

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Re: Reasons why the Death Penalty does work!
« Reply #16 on: August 15, 2010, 05:12:38 PM »
I have a grudging respect (though it isn't a view I hold myself) for people who are genuinely opposed to violence and would rather die themselves than use it.

I can understand why they oppose the death penalty because it is consistent with their own moral perspective.

However, I do not feel respect for those who consider that justice can be served by putting murderers behind bars for a few years rather than simply executing them.

My attitude is simple; if murderers stopped killing, they would not face the death penalty.

Offline lambdachi1826

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Re: Reasons why the Death Penalty does work!
« Reply #17 on: August 17, 2010, 06:46:17 AM »
Here's how I know it works: The appeals system. Clearly this is the ONLY form of punishment these beasts fear. It is the ONLY thing that seems to teach them a lesson. Otherwise the wouldn't fight tooth and nail for years and literally BEG to be spared and given LWOP. Why would someone willingly choose the worse of two punishments? Death is the only fitting penalty for them...Both for safety reasons and for the serving of justice!

Offline Harold1253

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Re: Reasons why the Death Penalty does work!
« Reply #18 on: August 17, 2010, 11:13:15 PM »
It is often said that murderers are the criminals least likely to repeat their crimes.
Does that statistic matter if you become the victim of one who bucks the trend? ----------------------------          3/7/2009 - Ohio

Parolee who killed self, 5 others had vowed to change
A man who killed himself a day after allegedly killing his wife and four others told a judge in 2005 that he was ready to be a law-abiding citizen who would not let society down if he was released from prison. "I swear to you from the bottom of my heart that I 'WILL NOT' let you down. Let my wife or children down. Let my family down. Let society down. Or especially, let myself down," Davon Crawford wrote to Cuyahoga County Judge Michael Russo as part of a motion for release. Crawford, who was freed in 2007, shot himself in the head Friday afternoon when confronted by police in the bathroom of a house not far from the house where his wife, along with his sister-in-law and her three young children were found dead, said Police Lt. Thomas Stacho. Police said Crawford is suspected of killing them. Cuyahoga County coroner's spokesman Powell Cesar confirmed Saturday that all five victims were shot in the head. Crawford, 33, was divorced from his first wife about three months after writing the letter to Russo, records show. He married again only on Monday of the same week, according to Lamar Arnold, the father of his new wife, 30-year-old Lechea Crawford. She was one of the women killed in the couple's home Thursday night, and police say a 2-month-old baby girl, Laylah was found unharmed in the home. The two-story red-and-yellow wood frame home where Crawford died is located in a densely populated Cleveland neighborhood. Several dozen people lined up behind yellow police tape across the street, cheering as a sheet-covered stretcher was removed from the house, and cheering again when a van left the neighborhood with the body Friday evening. Dozens also gathered Friday evening about four blocks away, on the street where Thursday's slayings took place, to hold a candlelight vigil and rally. A memorial of more than a dozen stuffed animals had grown on the front steps. Crawford was convicted in 1995 of a plea-bargained voluntary manslaughter charge after killing 22-year-old Joseph Smith in a dispute over a girlfriend. "I didn't mean to take a life, but a life is took," Crawford said during his trial. "I apologize to the family [of Smith], but I did what I had to do." He was released in 2000 and sent back to prison in 2002 on a felonious assault conviction involving domestic violence, endangering children, having a weapon while on parole and failure to comply with an officer's order. In the 2005 letter, Crawford apologizes for firing a gun in his home and says, "I made an insensible choice in a moment of anger that could have actually cost me my wife and children.... I now realize that when I make bad impulsive decisions, that I do not only hurt myself, but that I hurt everyone that love and cares for me as well, and especially my children." He wrote that his then-wife had lung cancer and that he had a job and supporting family waiting for him. His wife, mother and others wrote Russo on his behalf, noting that he had three children at the time and had taken parenting and anger management courses and was studying dental lab technology. While on parole, which ended last year, Crawford passed several drug tests, paid his child support, had a full-time job and no run-ins with authorities, according to Andrea Carson, a spokeswoman for the Department of Rehabilitation and Correction. However relatives said he had recently failed a drug test and was worried about having to go back to prison. Police searching for Crawford on Friday received a tip about his whereabouts and set up surveillance at the house where he was later seen by authorities, Stacho said. Officers forced their way through the front door and found Crawford hiding in the bathtub, officials said. He fired one shot from a handgun, killing himself, said Jeff Carter, a U.S. Marshals Service spokesman. "There was no standoff," Stacho said. "As they confronted him, he shot himself." Stacho said officials believe a relative of Crawford lives at the house. He said a woman was found in another part of the home, but police did not release any information about her connection to Crawford. Police Chief Michael McGrath said it appears that some sort of domestic argument sparked Thursday's shootings. Besides Lechea Wiggins Crawford, killed were her sister Rose Stevens, 25, and Stevens' three children: 4-year-old Destanee Woods and 2-year-old twins Dion and Davion Primm. Lechea's 7-year-old son Kamar was wounded and was being treated at MetroHealth Medical Center. Two other boys in the house, ages 12 and 13, escaped unharmed and one called 911, officials said.


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3/3/09 - Illinois

Husband in murder-suicide had killed previous wife
A man who stabbed his first wife to death more than two decades ago used a Civil War replica rifle to kill his current wife and her son before committing suicide in their upscale suburban Chicago home, police said. Richard Wiley left a 40-page, handwritten suicide note indicating he shot and killed Kathy Motes, 50, and Christopher Motes, 17, and saying he refused to go back to prison, Wilmette police Deputy Chief Brian King said. Police conducting a well-being check Monday found the three bodies inside their Wilmette home, a parsonage of the family's church, where Kathy Motes worked. King said Wiley, 54, apparently killed his wife and stepson Saturday afternoon, then shot himself Sunday night. Wiley stabbed his 25-year-old wife, Ruth, to death in 1985, and was convicted and sentenced to 30 years in prison two years later, according to news reports at the time. He was paroled in 2000. At his murder trial, Wiley said he suffered from a rare mental disease called "intermittent explosive disorder," but the judge rejected his claim that he was insane. Wiley reportedly called police himself after the 1985 killing and was found "leaning over the victim, hugging her and crying, `I'm sorry, I'm sorry.'" Wiley suggested in his suicide note that he killed Kathy Motes during an argument, then killed her son. "It's a kind of a dissertation of the difficulties that Mr. Wiley was having," King said of the note, adding that it included "hints of remorse." Authorities believe Wiley shot Kathy Motes around 2:30 p.m Saturday, then shot the teen when he returned home from a Boy Scout meeting later in the afternoon, King said. The bodies of Wiley and Kathy Motes were found in a second-floor bedroom, while Christopher Motes was found in an upstairs bathroom; all three had single gunshot wounds to the head, King said. The murder weapon, found by Wiley's body in a second-floor bedroom, was a black-powder, muzzleloading Civil War replica rifle that may have belonged to Christopher Motes, a Civil War buff, King said. Wiley apparently had sawed off the barrel of the rifle, which could take several minutes to load because it requires black powder and a metal ball to be loaded through the muzzle, he said. Despite Wiley's criminal history, King said police had no previous complaints of violence at the Wilmette home and there were no orders of protection against Wiley. "There's nothing that predicted this level of violence in that home," King said at a news conference. But James Morici, who prosecuted Wiley for the 1985 murder, said he remembered Wiley as intelligent but scary and that he feared Wiley might come after him. "I don't know why I felt this way, but I always thought that if anyone I prosecuted was sitting in the penitentiary counting the days, looking to seek me out in revenge, it would be Wiley," Morici said. Wiley grew up in relative wealth in Wilmette, attended New Trier Township High School and became known as "a party boy" with alcohol problems, Morici said. Wiley met Kathy Motes through their church, First Presbyterian of Wilmette, where she worked as an office coordinator. The pastor, the Rev. Sarah Sarchet Butter, said church members knew about Wiley's past but that "our faith community welcomed and loved him." Wiley was unemployed but was a talented carpenter who had built cabinets for the church, Butter said. She said Kathy Motes was "beloved of our congregation." Christopher Motes' classmates at New Trier were in shock, District 203 Superintendent Linda Yonke said Tuesday. "Chris was a well-known and well-loved senior," Yonke said. "He was an easygoing student who had many friends." He participated in Scouts, belonged to a military history club at New Trier and had been accepted to attend Roanoke College in Virginia, Yonke said.


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10/2008 - Georgia

Sentenced to death but released to kill again: On March 6, 1974, James Rouse Jr. was abducted at gunpoint in his car by two fugitives--William Jordan and Anthony Prevatte.  Both men were wanted in North Carolina for a series of robberies. The car ride ended on a remote back road at the edge of a forest in Georgia. The kidnappers forced James Rouse to march barefoot into the woods. When they reached the shore of a deserted lake, they stopped. James Rouse was shot at point-blank range with a sawed-off shotgun. He died instantly. The next day, in Wadesboro, North Carolina, police received and anonymous tip that Jordan and Prevatte were back in town. According to Sheriff Tommy Allen, Jr. of the Anson County Sheriff's Department, the two fugitives were hiding at the home of a friend: "Prevatte and Jordan had a reputation for being predominately into property theft, housebreaking, and those types of things. We didn't really suspect that they were involved in anything serious, other than that." The deputies approached the house, fully expecting to make an arrest. But according to Sheriff Allen, Jordan and Prevatte were one step ahead of them: "Everything was happening so fast, but it seemed extreme that these guys were using this much excessive force to get away from us just because we wanted to talk to them about some house break-ins." Prevatte and Jordan were booked on charges of breaking and entering, larceny, and assaulting officers with a firearm. But police in North Carolina still didn't know that the two men were killers. 48 hours later, the body of James Rouse was discovered near a lake in Georgia. It was his stolen car that Jordan and Prevatte had crashed in Wadesboro. It didn't take long to piece together the rest. A shotgun shell found at the murder scene sealed the case against Jordan and Prevatte.   Ballistics test revealed that Rouse had been killed with a blast from the same shotgun that the pair had dumped during the chase. Finally, and most chilling of all, police in North Carolina found arrogant trophies of the murder in Georgia. According to Sheriff Allen, Jordan and Prevatte took photos of themselves leaning against Rouse's car with the same shotgun that killed him: "They were both eventually extradited back to Georgia, both found guilty of first-degree murder, both given the death sentence." However, neither Jordan nor Prevatte stayed on death row. The Georgia Supreme Court reduced their sentences to life in prison. It wasn't long before Prevatte was paroled. Soon after, he murdered his girlfriend and was returned to prison. Once again, he was sentenced to death. This time, the sentence stood. The story of William Jordan, however, has yet to end. After ten years in prison, Jordan was assigned to a minimum-security work farm for good behavior. But his image as a model prisoner proved false. One day, Jordan and a fellow prisoner stole a truck near a work site and drove off. A month later, police caught the inmate who escaped with him, but Jordan has eluded capture ever since. Decades have passed since Jordan and Prevatte murdered James Rouse Jr., but his family still feels the pain. William Jordan is 6'2" tall, has brown graying hair, and probably wears glasses. Jordan has several distinctive tattoos, including a spider on his right arm and a cross with the name "Sybil" on his left arm.

5/5/2008 - Maryland

A two-time convicted murderer is on trial for strangling another inmate aboard a prison bus
In her opening statement, assistant Baltimore County State's Attorney Ann Brobst said 25-year-old Kevin Johns strangled 20-year-old Phillip Parker because killing people causes him to become sexually aroused. Defense attorney Harry Trainor countered that Johns has suffered from a lifetime of mental illness and could not control his actions. Earlier Monday, Johns waived his right to a jury trial. Harford County Circuit Court Judge Emory Plitt is hearing the case. Johns allegedly killed Parker aboard a bus that was taking inmates from Hagerstown to Baltimore in February 2005. The day before Parker died, he had testified at Johns' sentencing for the 2004 murder of a prisoner at the Maryland Correctional Training Center near Hagerstown.


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7/24/2004 - Alabama

Man murdered woman who befriended him after prior murder conviction
James Hubbard was sentenced to death in 1977 for the murder of a Tuscaloosa woman who befriended him after he was released from prison. Hubbard had served a 20 year sentence for a murder conviction, and called police to report a shooting on January 10, 1977. He said Lillian Montgomery, whom he was living with, had shot herself at her home in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. She died as the result of three gunshot wounds, one to the face, one to the head, and one to the shoulder, a difficult accomplishment as a suicide. Hubbard first went to prison in 1957 for a second-degree murder conviction in the death of David Dockery in Tuscaloosa County. He was released in 1976 and killed again the next year. His second victim, 62-year-old store owner Lillian Montgomery, was shot three times and robbed of her gold and diamond wristwatch and about $500 in cash and checks. She had befriended Hubbard and "sponsored" him to gain his release in 1976. Hubbard had moved into her home next door to the store she ran on U.S. Highway 82, according to court records. In a police statement, Hubbard said he had been drinking whiskey with Montgomery and claimed she committed suicide. Prosecutors introduced evidence that she couldn't have fired the fatal shots on Jan. 10, 1977. Hubbard was twice convicted in her death. An appeals court overturned the first conviction. But he was again sentenced to death at retrial and in 2003 the U.S. Supreme Court refused to review it. The victim's son, Jimmy Montgomery, 66, a Tuscaloosa businessman, said he and his sister plan to attend the execution. "I hope it will be over," Montgomery said. "He shot her with a pistol I'd given her." Another son, 58-year-old Johnny Montgomery, a Birmingham-area real estate agent, doesn't plan to witness the execution, saying he feels "powerless" over what goes on with Hubbard and has never communicated with him. "One time I could have taken care of this guy with my own hands if they let me," the younger brother said in a telephone interview. "God has given me peace with this. I have forgiven him."


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just a few examples taken from prodeathpenalty.com recidivism window                           

Offline texaschickeee

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Re: Reasons why the Death Penalty does work!
« Reply #19 on: August 24, 2010, 02:39:56 PM »
Let me add one question then: Has an inmate locked up in solitary confinement under max.sec. conditions ever killed again?

Since you can not lock someone up 24 7 that is not a viable question. DR in Texas has had many attacks on officers and inmates. So the answer is yes.

The DP works as it never allows these crimainls to kill again. There are RULES that you must meet to get to DR. commiting two felonies at one time is the starting point. If your shooting and robbing- you deserve some final punishment as you get basically the same thing you dowled out. Not that it makes it an eye for an eye- the killer NEVER has as much pain, fear and blood as they give when they kill. fact is that If you rape, kidnap, rob, shoot and then kill the person you deserve to be locked away until the needle comes for you. the needle is far better then what they do. trust me.
‘Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go.’

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Offline texaschickeee

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Re: Reasons why the Death Penalty does work!
« Reply #20 on: August 24, 2010, 02:54:24 PM »
(from above) there are THREE cases that I remember from growing up in Houston that to this day haunt me with the brutal attack and basic animal like killing that took place. In 1982 the Malibu slaughter.....
http://www.baylor.edu/Lariat/news.php?action=story&story=11287
 
Joe Cantu (Ertman and Pena) and Karla Faye Tucker. They now all have been put down. In each one of these cases it could have been ANYONE that was killed after the brutal attack.
ANd for the record- I am persoanlly friends with Anthony Shores X wife and Both of us thnk he deserves to be where he is. I went to school with Peter's brother and met him 2 times (at the most) and He was ALWAYS a mean SOB- and never met a bottle He didnt like. (notice please all of his crimes were done under the influance of at least alcohol). If they can not stop them selves from killing like savage beast- they deserve to be taken out back like ol' yeller. they are the rabid people among us.
‘Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go.’

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Offline texaschickeee

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Re: Reasons why the Death Penalty does work!
« Reply #21 on: August 25, 2010, 05:34:41 AM »
funny what you can find when not looking,. I gave tose answers yesterday and had to look something up today. heres a sample.....
 
In February 2000 two death row inmates took a 57-year old female corrections officer hostage, forcing negotiations involving the warden. One of the hostage-takers, Ponchai Wilkerson, was scheduled to be executed on March 14, 2000 and was later executed on that date. The other, Howard Guidry, had no scheduled execution date. Guidry remains on death row.

On May 9, 2000, 33-year old death row inmate Juan Salvez Soria, who was scheduled to be executed on July 26, 2000, pulled the arm of a 78-year old William Paul Westbrook, a prison chaplain from Livingston, into his cell. The offender tied a sheet around the chaplain's arm and tied the other end to a toilet; Soria then began cutting Westbrook's arm with a razor blade. The offender nearly tore the arm off of Westbrook. The authorities used Tear gas to stop the attack.  Authorities treated Soria's former cell as a crime scene and moved Soria to a more restricted area within the prison. Soria was executed on his scheduled date.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polunsky_Unit
 
 
any questions. they are not there for singing too loudly in the choir, or being at church. their behavior placed them squarely in that position and this is called accountability.
‘Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go.’

Oscar Wilde

Offline texaschickeee

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Re: Reasons why the Death Penalty does work!
« Reply #22 on: August 31, 2010, 11:27:58 AM »
thaks grannyB. I dont know how it got pink and I couldnt change it back.
 ???
‘Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go.’

Oscar Wilde

frmarcus

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There's no evidence that the death penalty works.
« Reply #23 on: September 13, 2010, 02:52:27 PM »

The death penalty doesn't seem to deter people from committing serious violent crimes. The thing that deters is the likelihood of being caught and punished.

The general consensus among social scientists is that the deterrent effect of the death penalty is at best unproven.

In 1988 a survey was conducted for the UN to determine the relation between the death penalty and homicide rates. This was then updated in 1996. It concluded:

   " ...research has failed to provide scientific proof that executions have a greater deterrent effect than life imprisonment. Such proof is unlikely to be forthcoming. The evidence as a whole still gives no positive support to the deterrent hypothesis.

    The key to real and true deterrence is to increase the likelihood of detection, arrest and conviction.

    The death penalty is a harsh punishment, but it is not harsh on crime."

Of course, it's impossible to test the deterrent effect of a punishment in a rigorous way, as to do so would require knowing how many murders would've been committed in a particular state if the law had been different during the same time period.

Can it be right to have the DP on the ground that it only might[/i] have some deterrent effect?  I suggest not.

heidi salazar

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Re: Reasons why the Death Penalty does work!
« Reply #24 on: September 13, 2010, 03:20:47 PM »
When copying and pasting please post article link..thank you.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/ethics/capitalpunishment/against_1.shtml


Failure to deter

The death penalty doesn't seem to deter people from committing serious violent crimes. The thing that deters is the likelihood of being caught and punished.

The general consensus among social scientists is that the deterrent effect of the death penalty is at best unproven.

In 1988 a survey was conducted for the UN to determine the relation between the death penalty and homicide rates. This was then updated in 1996. It concluded:

    ...research has failed to provide scientific proof that executions have a greater deterrent effect than life imprisonment. Such proof is unlikely to be forthcoming. The evidence as a whole still gives no positive support to the deterrent hypothesis.

    The key to real and true deterrence is to increase the likelihood of detection, arrest and conviction.

    The death penalty is a harsh punishment, but it is not harsh on crime.

    Amnesty International

NB: It's actually impossible to test the deterrent effect of a punishment in a rigorous way, as to do so would require knowing how many murders would have been committed in a particular state if the law had been different during the same time period.



Offline Angelstorm

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Re: Reasons why the Death Penalty does work!
« Reply #25 on: September 13, 2010, 07:12:25 PM »
I would suggest that the Death Penalty has more of a deterrant effect than releasing these SOB's back into society does.  And, if the Death Penalty doesn't deter and murderers are unconcerned by it and will therefore commit murder anyway - then how come the majority of North Carolina's Death Row have just filed appeals under the new racial justice act, whether they have a leg to stand on or not?   ???  I'm pretty sure the DP has some deterrant effect, just my .02 worth.

Offline robertwnielsen

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Re: Reasons why the Death Penalty does work!
« Reply #26 on: September 23, 2010, 08:15:51 PM »
I would suggest that the Death Penalty has more of a deterrant effect than releasing these SOB's back into society does.  And, if the Death Penalty doesn't deter and murderers are unconcerned by it and will therefore commit murder anyway - then how come the majority of North Carolina's Death Row have just filed appeals under the new racial justice act, whether they have a leg to stand on or not?   ???  I'm pretty sure the DP has some deterrant effect, just my .02 worth.


Plus the fact -- I don't care how "Maximum" a "maximum security prison" claims to be - there's always going to be the chance that the POS is going to escape, and murder again.  With the death penalty (assuming the POS doesn't get their sentence commuted to LWOP, or even worse, expurgated), you always know that there's no chance in hell that the POS will murder again!!   :(
Has anybody ever told you you have a SERIOUS IMPULSE CONTROL PROBLEM??

Offline Endisnear

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Re: Reasons why the Death Penalty does work!
« Reply #27 on: November 08, 2010, 02:41:22 PM »
It makes zero sense for citizens to pay for someone to rot in jail until they die. It keeps tax payers in debt.
They will get their punishment afterlife and if there is no afterlife there is even less reason to keep them alive. debt relief program


Offline JTiscool

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Re: Reasons why the Death Penalty does work!
« Reply #28 on: November 08, 2010, 06:57:47 PM »
Reposting this from a thread I made. Some of the points in here cover why the death penalty works.

Being new to the site I am unsure if a thread like this has been made but here it is. A thread that I was inspired to make based on a thread on a separate forum on a separate topic not relating to the death penalty. What these "types" of threads are designed to do is address each common argument an anti death penalty activists would use and use logic to shoot it down. If I missed any arguments antis make then please let me know and I will gladly add it to this post. Well, get a nice drink and some snacks ready because this will be a long read.

Also this isn't meant for every anti specifically. Just those that are thug lovers.

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1.) The cost of usiing the death penalty is a lot higher than the cost of Life imprisonment.


Not true. If we use the firing squad than all it will cost is a bullet or 4 under $1. It will also spare us the bullshit issues over the lethal injection protocol.

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2.) Even so, the cost of the death penalty trial is higher than any normal trial.


Maybe so but if we refuse to pay that much to avenge the murder of the victim then we are essentially putting a price tag on the victim's life and saying that their life is worth only a certain amount of money. Everyone's life has an unlimited price tag.

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3.) If everyone has an unlimited price tag then why deprive the defendants of their right to live.


There are certain circumstances where a person loses their right to life. This is one of them especially when he has a history of violent crimes and the evidence against him is overwhelming. If we want to keep people safe from murders including prison officials, other inmates and the unsuspecting public in case they might escape. They could kill and have nothing to lose because what's another life sentence without parole on top of the 1+ life without parole sentences he is already serving?

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4.) Some people were released from death row.


Yes because back then there was ineffective DNA testing and we didn't have the sophisticated technology back then that we do now so basically anyone we convict now will pretty much be the right person.

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5.) The chances of an inmate escaping and killing other people are very very low.


Strawman argument. The chances of that are indeed low but pretty much as likely that an innocent man will be executed with all the current technology and DNA testing.

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6.) What can the death penalty do that Life imprisonment without the possibility of parole cannot do?


Refer to point #3

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7.) What about a bias jury sentencing the defendant to death?


Another strawman argument. [Unfortunately] people against the death penalty have an advantage when it comes to jury sentences. The majority of the states that do have the death penalty require that the sentencing verdict is unanimous between all 6-12 jurors (depending on how many jurors are used). That means if one anti is in the jury box for the sentencing then there is pretty much a 95% chance that an agreement will not be reached and a default sentence of life in prison will be the result.

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8. The anti swore to be as unbiased as possible though


Irrelevant. You can claim that you will use an unbiased view all you want but the fact of the matter is you and every other anti can pretty much be biased without being detected.

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9.) The current widely used death penalty method [Lethal injection] is cruel and unusual punishment


Then that can be said about putting animals down at the MSPCA because you can't find a home for them. They have a right to live too but if you can't find them a place to live then you have to put them down because it's too costly to take care of them thus you are putting a limited value on their life. The only difference is the animals in question didn't harm anyone, the defendants did. So if it's cruel and inhumane punishment for the defendant then it is for the animals, correct?  ::)

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10.) How do you know the family of the victim(s) want the death penalty sought?


This is why I believe that the prosecution should give the family the sole decision on whether or not to seek the death penalty (if available and the crime warrants it)

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11.) The family of the victim only wants blood and revenge.


Irrelevant. The family lost their loved one. If they want to see their loved one's murderer punished to the fullest extent of the law they deserve to have their wish granted. After all it's them that lost a loved one.

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12.) The family of the defendant was put through distress too.


That's no one's fault but the defendant himself for committing the crime.

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13.) The defendant had a very rough childhood and past.


Irrelevant. Tons of people have had very rough times in their past but they don't go on killing sprees. Hell, my past hasn't been the most ideal yet I'm a well behaved citizen.

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14.) It still violates the rights of the defendant.


How so? The defendant has/had more rights than the victim. The victim never got to choose their last meal before they got died, they never got a trial, they never were charged with anything. They also never got to see their family before they were killed. Where was their free shot?

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15.) Why are you guys so hell bent on punishing a murderer by ending his life.


Why do you people only mention the murderers? Why don't you guys ever think of the victims?

Hope you enjoyed this read. If there is anything I missed please bring it to my attention and I will add it in. Also if there is anything else I could have said for each point, please let me know and I'll modify it accordingly  ;)

If there is already a thread on this then I apologize. If this is in the wrong section, then please move it to the correct section. Thanks.
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

Offline mlc2005

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Re: Reasons why the Death Penalty does work!
« Reply #29 on: November 30, 2010, 09:12:56 AM »
aside from the irrefutable fact that the death penalty is the ONLY morally proper punishment for first degree murder, and the fact that murderers continue to murder as long as they're drawing breath, the ultimate goal of the antis is to not even imprison murderers. 
look at the abject stupidity constantly being spouted by the imbeciles in brussels.  the garbage at the illegitimate travesty known as the world court have made the imbecillic comment that lwop is inhumane.  the virulent anti human rights stance of the european governments clearly demonstrate that the goal of these anti democratic outfits is to thrust their perversion on the entire world.
look at the denmark prisons, where their stated goal is to make the prison exactly like life on the outside.  the prisoners have their family with them, cook their own meals, and all sorts of other idiocy.  hell, why wouldn't those chaps want to be in prison?  free home, just like home, and they get to sit on their dead azzes and do nothing.  denmark has a thirty percent recidivism rate because of this.
the ONLY way to stop a murderer from murdering is to ensure that he's no longer breathing.  if there were just one person in ten years murdered by a murderer in prison, or escaped, it more than morally justifies the execution of EVERY murderer.
of course, this only applies for people who care about human life


Just to point out here that this comment is very misleading:  Yes, the Denmark recidivism rate is 30 percent, but that is actually very LOW.  UK's recidivism rate for example, is over 50  percent, as is America's.  I actually think Denmark's approach is worthwhile, because it doesn't throw away the key for drug offenses that cause so many people in the US to be in jail for insanely long periods of time. 

What I don't agree with is the whole anti-death penalty approach of the European Union.  I think the US is right to have the death penalty.  I wish the two types of systems could be combined:  Denmark (and others) have figured out a way to keep recidivism lower than other countries, but is soft on violent crime.  The US is great at punishing violent offenders, but tends to overly punish non-violent drug offenders. That is why the US has the highest incarceration rate in the world (higher even than China and Russia).   Just my thoughts.