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Author Topic: 15 Yr Old Nicholas Browning Kills Parents, 2 Younger Brothers in Maryland  (Read 809 times)

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Offline Jeff1857

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COCKEYSVILLE, Md. - A 15-year-old boy who wasn't getting along with his father was charged with murder Sunday in the deaths of his parents and two younger brothers, who were shot in their sleep at their home in a Baltimore suburb.

After the killings, police said, Nicholas Waggoner Browning spent the night and next day with friends, before returning and reporting he had found his father's body.

He was arrested at 1:05 a.m. Sunday after he admitted committing the killings, Baltimore County Police spokesman Bill Toohey said.

Browning was charged as an adult with four counts of first-degree murder in the slayings of his father, lawyer John Browning, 45; his mother Tamara, 44; and his brothers Gregory, 13, and Benjamin, 11.

The teen had not been getting along with his father, police said in a news release. On Friday night, he went into the house after other family members had gone to sleep and shot each of them using his father's handgun, which was in the house, police said.

After the slayings, he threw the gun into bushes near the house, police said. The gun was recovered, Toohey said.

Browning then spent Friday night and all day Saturday with friends, Toohey said. When the friends took him back to his house at 5 p.m. Saturday, Browning went into the house and came back out to say that his father was dead. He called 911.

Police officers said all four victims were shot in their sleep. They said Browning's father was found in a ground-floor room and his mother and brothers were dead in upstairs bedrooms. There was no sign of a confrontation, Toohey said.

Browning, a sophomore at Dulaney High School in neighboring Timonium, was denied bail Sunday morning; a bail review hearing was scheduled Monday. He was being held at the Baltimore County Detention Center in a special section for juveniles.

Toohey said he didn't know if Browning had a lawyer.

Even if convicted as an adult of first-degree murder, Browning is too young under state law to face the death penalty.

Two of Browning's classmates drove past the family's house Sunday afternoon and wept when they learned from reporters that he was charged in the slayings.

"It's hard to believe someone could do this," said Brooke Kebaugh, 16.

Liz Lazlawbach, 17, said Browning complained about fighting with his father, but "not about anything violent."

The grounds of the two-story home were neat and neighbor Mike Thomas said the Brownings would even pick up trash along the street.

"These people would do anything in the world for you just incredible people," Thomas said.

Neighbors called each other throughout the night to discuss the killings, Thomas said. He said one of his sons had been in Boy Scouts with one of the Brownings' sons and was devastated when he learned of the deaths.

John Browning was a partner in the law firm of Royston, Mueller, McLean & Reid in Towson, focusing on real estate law and commercial and corporate law.

The partners said Browning was an accomplished lawyer. "He was also a person invested in his family and community," the partners said. "He led his local scout troop. He was a leader at his church. In short, John Browning was a great man. We will all miss him very, very much."

The Brownings' Boy Scout unit, Troop 328, meets at Timonium United Methodist Church. The Rev. Frances Dailey said Sunday that the troop's leaders did not want to talk. He said John Browning was "beloved and well revered. I'm told this is not the kind of family that this could happen to."

Counselors were to be available Monday to meet with students at Dulaney High, said Charles Herndon, a county school spokesman. He declined to say where Browning's younger brothers went to school.
-------------------------------------------------------------------So very sad when you hear about cases like this.

tramoore

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COCKEYSVILLE, Md. -- A 15-year-old boy charged with four counts of first-degree murder in the killings of his parents and his two younger brothers faces a bail-review hearing Monday. Meanwhile, counselors will be on hand at two area schools to help students deal with what happened.

Nicholas Waggoner Browning has been charged as an adult in the slayings of his father, John Browning, 45; his mother Tamara, 44; and his brothers Gregory, 13, and Benjamin, 11, according to Baltimore County police.
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The victims were found dead Saturday evening inside a home in Cockeysville, north of Baltimore. A small, silver-colored crucifix was hanging from the Brownings' mailbox Sunday, and a vigil was held at the scene Sunday night.

Police spokesman Bill Toohey said Browning was formally arrested at 1:05 a.m. Sunday.

"Early Sunday morning, he did indeed admit that he killed them," Toohey said. Browning was denied bail at a hearing Sunday morning; bail review will be conducted Monday.

Toohey said Nicholas Browning, a student at Dulaney High School, had a disagreement with his father and used his father's handgun to kill his family Friday night.

After the slayings, police said he threw the gun away in bushes near his house.

Toohey told WBAL TV 11 News that the youth spent Friday night and all day Saturday with friends. When the friends took him back to his house at 5 p.m. Saturday, Browning went into the house and came back out to say that his father was dead.

"He was taken into the precinct almost immediately after he reported it, which is standard operating procedure," Toohey said of Nicholas Browning.

The neighborhood was quiet Sunday morning; no police officers remained at the scene and there was no sign of investigation or any other activity. The grounds of the two-story home were neat and there was a basketball backboard outside.

Neighbors who talked to 11 News reporter Melissa Carlson said the family had lived in the home for more than 12 years and described them as quiet, friendly and active members in the community.

The victims were found dead Saturday evening inside a home in Cockeysville, north of Baltimore.

Residents called each other throughout the night to talk about the tragedy, said resident Mike Thomas. He said one of his sons had been in Boy Scouts with one of the Brownings' sons and that Browning remained involved in scouting.

"These people would do anything in the world for you - just incredible people," Thomas said. For instance, Thomas said the Brownings would pick up debris along the street.

John Browning had been an attorney for 19 years with Royston, Mueller, McLean & Reid, and was a partner in the law firm in the county seat of Towson, about six miles from the family's home.

Nicholas Browning is being held at the Baltimore County Detention Center in a special section for juveniles.

Counselors were to be available Monday to meet with students at Dulaney High, said Charles Herndon, a county school spokesman.
Posted on: February 04, 2008, 09:32:21 AM
COCKEYSVILLE, Maryland (AP) -- Authorities offered no further insight into the motive of a teenager accused in the shooting deaths of his father, mother and two brothers, but experts say such crimes are not unprecedented -- and they often come without any obvious warning signs.

Nicholas W. Browning remained jailed without bond after confessing early Sunday that he killed his father, John Browning, his mother, Tamara, and his younger brothers, Gregory, 14, and Benjamin, 11, according to Baltimore County police.

Browning, who turns 16 on Saturday, had no history of violence, mental health problems or drug problems, according to court documents.

His father was a highly regarded business attorney, and the family lived in an affluent suburb. Browning played golf and lacrosse, was active in his church and was close to becoming an Eagle Scout.

Those details were not surprising to Paul A. Mones, a defense attorney for children accused of killing their parents, who wrote a book about his work called "When a Child Kills."

"This happens to kids in middle- and upper-middle-class, even upper-class homes," said Mones, who practices in Portland, Oregon. "It happens in families that, from the outside, look like normal, typical, great families."

In the United States, about 300 children a year are charged with killing one or both parents, Mones said. Cases where a child kills the entire family, known as "familicide," are less frequent.

Louis B. Schlesinger, a professor of a forensic psychology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York, said familicide is more commonly committed by a depressed or jealous father.

Slayings of relatives by teenagers "are usually spontaneous sorts of things," Schlesinger said. "With the brooding, depressive male adult, it's not spontaneous, it's much more thought through, with obsessive rumination prior to it. With a teenager, it's almost always impulsive, spontaneous, and there happens to be a loaded gun around."

Mones said slayings are typically motivated by one of two factors: "extreme family dysfunction in terms of physical and emotional abuse, or severe mental health issues that pervade the family, whether it's the perpetrator or the parents or themselves.

"There are cases where kids just snap out of the blue and go on a rampage, but it's really, really rare."

Bill Toohey, a police spokesman, said Browning told officers where they could find the gun used in the slayings, which he tossed into some bushes near the home. The gun belonged to John Browning and was kept inside the home.

Experts said easy access to guns was a common thread in cases where children kill their parents.

"The biggest risk factor that was not prevented was his access to firearms, and I think that's the biggest tragedy," said Dr. Anandhi Narasimhan, a Los Angeles-based child psychiatrist.

Narasimhan noted that because mental health records are confidential, it's impossible to know for sure whether Browning was suffering from mental illness or had shown other warning signs, such as bullying at school or cruelty to animals.

Mones hypothesizes that such slayings are more frequent in affluent families because wealth makes abuse easier to conceal.

"If you look at reports of abuse and family problems in upper-middle class families, it's really low, because the walls between the families and the world are very, very high," he said. "In lower-income communities, the police and social service agencies have a major presence, so it's nothing to call 911 when a kid's being mistreated or a neighbor hears screams."
Posted on: February 06, 2008, 03:39:37 PM
COCKEYSVILLE, Md. - Authorities offered no further insight into the motive of a teenager accused in the shooting deaths of his father, mother and two brothers, but experts say such crimes often come without any obvious warning signs.

Nicholas W. Browning remained jailed without bond after confessing early Sunday that he killed his father, John Browning, his mother, Tamara, and his younger brothers, Gregory, 14, and Benjamin, 11, according to Baltimore County police.

Browning, who turns 16 on Saturday, had no history of violence, mental health problems or drug problems, according to court documents. His father was a highly regarded business lawyer, and the family lived in an affluent suburb. Browning played golf and lacrosse, was active in his church, and was close to becoming an Eagle Scout.

Those details were not surprising to Paul A. Mones, a defense attorney for children accused of killing their parents, who wrote a book about his work called "When a Child Kills."

"This happens to kids in middle- and upper-middle-class, even upper-class homes," said Mones, who practices in Portland, Ore. "It happens in families that, from the outside, look like normal, typical, great families."

In the United States, about 300 children a year are charged with killing one or both parents, Mones said. Cases where a child kills the entire family, known as "familicide," are less frequent.

Louis B. Schlesinger, a professor of a forensic psychology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York, said familicide is more commonly committed by a depressed or jealous father.

Slayings of relatives by teenagers "are usually spontaneous sorts of things," Schlesinger said. "With the brooding, depressive male adult, it's not spontaneous, it's much more thought through, with obsessive rumination prior to it. With a teenager, it's almost always impulsive, spontaneous, and there happens to be a loaded gun around."

Access to firearms 'the biggest tragedy'
Mones said slayings are typically motivated by one of two factors: "extreme family dysfunction in terms of physical and emotional abuse, or severe mental health issues that pervade the family, whether it's the perpetrator or the parents themselves.

"There are cases where kids just snap out of the blue and go on a rampage, but it's really, really rare."

Bill Toohey, a police spokesman, said Browning told officers where they could find the gun used in the slayings, which he tossed into some bushes near the home. The gun belonged to John Browning and was kept inside the home.

Experts said easy access to guns was a common thread in cases where children kill their parents.

"The biggest risk factor that was not prevented was his access to firearms, and I think that's the biggest tragedy," said Dr. Anandhi Narasimhan, a Los Angeles-based child psychiatrist.

No family is immune
Narasimhan noted that because mental health records are confidential, it's impossible to know for sure whether Browning was suffering from mental illness or had shown other warning signs, such as bullying at school or cruelty to animals.

Mones hypothesizes that such slayings are more frequent in affluent families because wealth makes abuse easier to conceal.

"If you look at reports of abuse and family problems in upper-middle class families, it's really low, because the walls between the families and the world are very, very high," he said. "In lower-income communities, the police and social service agencies have a major presence, so it's nothing to call 911 when a kid's being mistreated or a neighbor hears screams."
Posted on: February 08, 2008, 01:51:59 PM
Attorneys for the Cockeysville teenager accused of killing his parents and younger brothers in February have withdrawn requests that they be allowed to accompany him during court-ordered psychiatric evaluations.

The judge handling the first-degree murder case of Nicholas W. Browning agreed yesterday during a brief court hearing that nothing the 16-year-old says during the evaluations will be used against him in his criminal court proceedings. Rather, the doctors' reports will be used only for a hearing in June at which lawyers in the case are scheduled to litigate the issue of whether Browning will be tried in adult court or be transferred to the juvenile system.

In ordering a psychiatric evaluation last month, Circuit Judge Thomas J. Bollinger Sr. said he would use the assessment "for the purpose of advising the court ... on the mental state of the defendant," which is one element he must consider in deciding where Browning should be tried.

A Dulaney High School sophomore, Browning is charged with four counts of first-degree murder and handgun offenses in the Feb. 2 deaths of his parents, John W. Browning and Tamara Browning, and his younger brothers, 14-year-old Gregory and 11-year-old Benjamin. All four were sleeping in their Cockeysville home when they were fatally shot.

The shootings occurred a week before Nicholas Browning's 16th birthday. Had he been 16 at the time of the killings, he would not be eligible for a transfer to juvenile court.


Offline nats

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Reading things like this it does make me think a lot less murders might take place in the usa if guns were not so readily available...

tramoore

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A Baltimore County judge has postponed until July a hearing that had been scheduled for next week to determine whether the Cockeysville teenager accused of killing his parents and two younger brothers should be tried in the juvenile system or remain in adult court.

Attorneys for Nicholas W. Browning, 16, asked the judge to reschedule the hearing to give mental health experts more time to review hundreds of pages of school and medical records and to finish their assessments of the boy.

This month, the lawyers also arranged for Browning to be taken from the Baltimore County Detention Center, where he is being held without bail, to a medical office for an MRI, court records show.

Browning, a sophomore at Dulaney High School, is accused of fatally shooting his parents, John W. Browning and Tamara Browning, and his brothers, Gregory, 14, and Benjamin, 11, as they slept in their Cockeysville home.

The deaths in February occurred a week before the defendant's 16th birthday. Had Browning been 16 at the time of the killings, the case could not be considered for a transfer to juvenile court.

Circuit Judge Thomas J. Bollinger also granted a request from the representatives of the Browning parents' estate to retrieve "certain personal and sentimental items" that police seized during their investigation.

"I fully understand that many of the items will need to be kept by you and possibly not even disclosed at this time, until the prosecution has been completed," one attorney for the estate wrote to prosecutors. He added, however, that family members were eager for the return of the couple's wedding rings and a collection of family photos that authorities had developed and printed.

The images, the attorney wrote, are "the most recent and last known photos of the family together."