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Author Topic: Ohio Death Penalty News  (Read 28597 times)

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Offline AnneTheBelgian

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Re: Ohio Death Penalty News
« Reply #150 on: January 12, 2012, 10:58:54 AM »
http://www.fox19.com/story/16502936/ohio-death-penalty-review-committee-to-meet

Ohio death penalty review committee to meet

Posted: Jan 12, 2012 9:06 AM

Updated: Jan 12, 2012 9:06 AM

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - A committee charged with examining possible changes to Ohio's death penalty law is ready to meet again.

Ohio Supreme Court Chief Justice Maureen O'Connor convened the task force while making it clear the committee won't debate whether Ohio should have capital punishment.

The committee, to meet publicly on Thursday at the Ohio Supreme Court in downtown Columbus, includes veteran prosecutors who have long supported the death penalty, along with defense attorneys who have fought its imposition.

The committee also includes judges, lawmakers, a sheriff, academic experts and a representative of the state prison system.

O'Connor, a Republican and a former prosecutor, has said the committee's goal is to produce a fair, impartial, and balanced analysis of the state's 30-year-old law.
























Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

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Offline AnneTheBelgian

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Re: Ohio Death Penalty News
« Reply #151 on: January 13, 2012, 12:39:56 PM »
http://www.10tv.com/content/stories/2012/01/12/columbus_state_death_penalty_law_under_scrutiny.html

(with video)

State Death Penalty Law Under Scrutiny

Thursday January 12, 2012 7:50 PM

UPDATED: Thursday January 12, 2012 7:51 PM

COLUMBUS, Ohio - State lawmakers were re-examining Ohio’s death penalty policies on Thursday after the American Bar Association called for a statewide moratorium on capital cases.

Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters said that he uses the death penalty in cases to uphold the law, 10TV’s Kevin Landers reported.

“No one is taking any joy in doing it, but as long as it’s on the books, I’m going to do it,” Deters said.

Judge Jim Brogan, chair of the death penalty task force, said that there are problems with the death penalty.

“We have it, and the question is how can we administer it fairly,” Brogan said.

The task force said that Ohio’s system was not broken but could use revising, questioning whether the state should provide more money to help defense counsel pay for experts.

Other ideas discussed included whether a state panel should be used to decide death-penalty eligible cases, whether someone’s mental health should remove them from the sentence and if the list of eligible crimes should be narrowed.

Race also was called into question, Landers reported.

“A black person commits a homicide against a white victim, we tend, as a society, to have a much higher incidence of those cases ending up on death row than other cross-racial homicides or same-race homicides,” Tim Young, director of the Office of the Ohio Public Defender, said.

According to the Attorney General’s Office, more than 50 percent of death row inmates are African American.

The Ohio death penalty task force said on Thursday that it was not ready to drop the gavel to change the system anytime soon, Landers reported.

Panel members also expressed concerns about the concentration of people sentenced to death in Cuyahoga County, where 390 indictments were filed since 1999, Landers reported.



























Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

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Offline Grinning Grim Reaper

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Re: Ohio Death Penalty News
« Reply #152 on: January 13, 2012, 01:10:24 PM »
Panel members also expressed concerns about the concentration of people sentenced to death in Cuyahoga County, where 390 indictments were filed since 1999, Landers reported.

Hell they should look at Harris County, Texas...they do 390 in a year!  ;D ;D ;D ;D
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

Offline Kevin R.Hirschkorn

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Re: Ohio Death Penalty News
« Reply #153 on: January 13, 2012, 01:25:45 PM »
Why is it so hard for them to get some one to the Death House. It's not like it matters if  they Change  things or not  Just  grow  a set  and  off  the scum.
This was designed to hurt....Its a SEAL Candace unless you have been there yo will never understand...

Offline Granny B

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Re: Ohio Death Penalty News
« Reply #154 on: January 13, 2012, 01:33:33 PM »
"Race also was called into question, Landers reported.

“A black person commits a homicide against a white victim, we tend, as a society, to have a much higher incidence of those cases ending up on death row than other cross-racial homicides or same-race homicides,” Tim Young, director of the Office of the Ohio Public Defender, said.

According to the Attorney General’s Office, more than 50 percent of death row inmates are African American.


LIAR!

RACE OF DEFENDANTS EXECUTED IN THE U.S. SINCE 1976
   
BLACK      441    35%
LATINO    96    7%
WHITE     717 56%
OTHER   24    2%

NOTE: The federal government counts some categories, such as Hispanics, as an ethnic group rather than a race. DPIC refers to all groups as races because the sources for much of our information use these categories.    

race chart 1 

RACE OF VICTIMS SINCE 1976
   
BLACK   285    15%
LATINO    113    6%
WHITE   1440 77%
OTHER   49    3%


NOTE: Number of Victims refers to the victims in the underlying murder in cases where an execution has occurred since the restoration of the death penalty in 1976. There are more victims than executions because some cases involve more than one victim
   

 race chart 2 

"In 82% of the studies [reviewed], race of the victim was found to influence the likelihood of being charged with capital murder or receiving the death penalty, i.e., those who murdered whites were found more likely to be sentenced to death than those who murdered blacks."
- United States General Accounting Office, Death Penalty Sentencing, February 1990

PERSONS EXECUTED FOR INTERRACIAL MURDERS IN THE U.S. SINCE 1976
   The cases represented in this graph are cases of one defendant executed for the murder of one or more victims of one race. Cases involving multiple victims of several different races are not included here.    

White Defendant / Black Victim (17)

Black Defendant / White Victim (254)

CURRENT U.S. DEATH ROW POPULATION BY RACE
   
BLACK   1,345    41.74%
LATINO   393            12.20%
WHITE   1,405    43.61%
OTHER   79            2.45%

(Death Row Population Figures from NAACP-LDF "Death Row USA (April 1, 2011)"    

race chart 3


Current Death Row Populations by Race
as of April 1, 2011
State    Total    Black    White    Latino    Asian    Native Amer.
Alabama    206           101             101              3             1             0
Arizona    134           15               90              25              1              3
Arkansas    42           25            16            1            0             0
California    717           258         257              166              24        12
Colorado       4        3          0              1             0             0
Connecticut 10         6          3             1             0           0
Delaware    20        10           7         3         0           0
Florida    400         144         216         37         2         1
Georgia    102         51         48           3         0         0
Idaho    16         0        16        0        0        0
Indiana    14        4        10        0        0        0
Kansas    9        4        5        0        0        0
Kentucky    35        5        29        1        0        0
Louisiana    86        56        26        3        1        0
Maryland    5        4        1        0        0        0
Mississippi 59        33        25        0        1        0
Missouri    48        21        27        0        0        0
Montana    2        0        2        0        0        0
Nebraska    12        2        5        5        0        0
Nevada    82        33        40        8        1        0
New Hampshire    1    1        0        0        0        0
New Mexico    2    0        2        0        0        0
North Carolina    85    66        4        1        9
Ohio        159    81    72    3    2    1
Oklahoma    74    28    37    3    0    6
Oregon*    36    4    27    3    0    1
Pennsylvania    219    133    66    18    2    0
South Carolina    61    32    27    2    0    0
South Dakota    3    0    3    0    0    0
Tennessee 87    36    46    1    2    2
Texas    321    126    97    94    4    0
Utah     9    1    5    2    0    1
Virginia    11    5    5    1    0    0
Washington 9    4    5    0    0    0
Wyoming    1    0    1    0    0    0
US Gov't    61    30    24    6    0    1
US Military 6    4    2    0    0    0

* One member of Death Row's race is not currently identified

(Some inmates were sentenced to death in more than one state, resulting in a total slightly higher than 3,222 when the individual states are combined.)

http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/race-death-row-inmates-executed-1976
" Closure? Closure is a misused word in the English language.  There is no such thing as closure for the family of a murder victim.  There will never be any closure for the death of our loved ones until we are dead ourselves.  The families have a lifetime sentence of anguish and sadness." 
Susan Levy

Offline JeffB

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Re: Ohio Death Penalty News
« Reply #155 on: January 13, 2012, 01:47:32 PM »
Thanks Granny..  I think those graphs pretty much tell you all you need to know...

Defendants exectuted since `76:  Predominately White.

Race of victims:  Overwhelmingly White.....

Current death row population:  Majority White.....


Perhaps the State of North Carolina and it's "Racial Justice Act" should consider this BASIC information..   ::)
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Offline AnneTheBelgian

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Re: Ohio Death Penalty News
« Reply #156 on: January 26, 2012, 02:16:59 PM »
http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/baf6d60025c8443f88e42728d7dbd173/OH--Death-Penalty-Ohio/

Ohio attorney general says state prison system refining execution polices per judge

ANDREW WELSH-HUGGINS  AP Legal Affairs Writer
   
First Posted: January 26, 2012 - 10:41 am
   
Last Updated: January 26, 2012 - 12:11 pm

COLUMBUS, Ohio — The state is once again refining its execution policies following a judge's ruling that criticized minor variations to Ohio's procedures, Attorney General Mike DeWine said Thursday.

The announcement comes as another execution was temporarily placed on hold while the debate over these variations works its way through the federal courts.

"We believe we have a constitutional system," DeWine told The Associated Press Thursday. "We want to make it a better procedure pursuant to the federal judge's order."

U.S. District Court Judge Gregory Frost stopped an execution last month because he said Ohio had broken its promise to follow its execution rules to the letter. He criticized the state for not properly recording a death row inmate's medical chart before an execution last fall and for not documenting the use of the lethal injection drug according to the written policies.

Frost said the issue was not necessarily small changes to Ohio's policies, but whether those changes are made in the proper way.

"This is not to say that Ohio must perform all executions in a precisely identical manner," Frost said in a Jan. 11 ruling. "All that is required is that Ohio apply the same overarching rules in every execution, with these rules allowing for necessary and approved non-core deviations."

Frost has also said his rulings aren't a commentary on the constitutionality of Ohio's execution procedures.

The Department of Rehabilitation and Correction could not immediately say Thursday what policies were being refined.

DeWine said that even if the new procedures pass muster with Frost, there are no plans to withdraw an appeal pending before the U.S. Supreme Court. DeWine said there are large constitutional issues that the high court must decide.

Frost on Thursday, without objection from the state, delayed the execution of a man who claims innocence in the 1990 arson death of his 3-year-old son.

The one-page ruling by Frost did not address the innocence claim but instead dealt with the issue of variations to the execution policies.

Michael Webb, who was scheduled to die Feb. 22, has argued that a leading arson expert can prove the 1990 fire in southwest Ohio could have been set anywhere in the house, and not just near a closet or bathroom.

Webb, 65, says that fact backs up his argument that someone else did it. He has asked the Ohio Parole Board for mercy, and the board will make its recommendation next week to Gov. John Kasich, who has the final say.

Attorneys for Webb say his situation is the same as another inmate whose execution is on hold over challenges to Ohio's lethal injection process.

Frost this month delayed the execution of Charles Lorraine of Warren, saying the state had failed to keep its promise of strictly following its execution policies. Frost was critical of deviations in an execution in November in which the inmate's medical chart wasn't properly checked and the documentation of the lethal drugs wasn't done according to the policies.































Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

Offline J - Dog

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Re: Ohio Death Penalty News
« Reply #157 on: January 26, 2012, 06:01:56 PM »
"We believe we have a constitutional system," DeWine told The Associated Press Thursday. "We want to make it a better procedure pursuant to the federal judge's order." 

DeWine said that even if the new procedures pass muster with Frost, there are no plans to withdraw an appeal pending before the U.S. Supreme Court. DeWine said there are large constitutional issues that the high court must decide.

So how long until the appeal gets review?  Let's clear the muddy waters and get this show on the road, make nice and neat, so Ohio can get back to business. 
"I don't aim ta scare" - Jonah Hex

Offline JeffB

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Re: Ohio Death Penalty News
« Reply #158 on: February 03, 2012, 09:12:10 AM »
Deters slaps Supreme Court justice over death penalty

02/03/12 at 11:27am
•Written by cweiser


Joe Deters (Enquirer file)

Dan Horn reports:

Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters called on Friday for Ohio Supreme Court Justice Paul Pfeifer to stop deciding death penalty cases because of the justice’s recent public criticism of capital punishment.

Deters, a staunch death penalty supporter, also blasted Pfeifer for suggesting Hamilton County too often seeks the death penalty in murder cases.

“Justice Pfeifer’s continued participation in deciding death penalty cases is inappropriate,” Deters said in a letter sent Friday to judges and fellow prosecutors across the state. ”It gives rise to a credible inference that he cannot be fair to both sides.”

Deters’ letter is the latest volley in an intensifying debate between Pfeifer and Deters over the future of capital punishment in Ohio.

Pfeifer, a Republican who helped write Ohio’s death penalty law as a state legislator in 1981, voiced his concerns during a House committee hearing in December and has singled out Deters for criticism in subsequent remarks to Ohio media.

The Enquirer will update this story.

To read Deter's letter, here's the link.  Click on the letter and it will go to full screen.  http://issuu.com/communitypress/docs/deters/1


http://cincinnati.com/blogs/politics/2012/02/03/deters-slaps-supreme-court-justice-over-death-penalty/
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Offline AnneTheBelgian

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Ohio Death Penalty News
« Reply #159 on: April 02, 2012, 11:08:18 AM »
http://www.wfmj.com/story/17305992/313-sentenced-to-death-in-ohio-since-1981

Copyright 2012

The Associated Press.

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - An annual report on Ohio's capital punishment system says 313 defendants have been sentenced to death since the state's death penalty law took effect in 1981, with 46 executions.

The report says 16 inmates were spared by governors and another 22 died of natural causes while on death row.

The report released Friday by Attorney General Mike DeWine also says eight inmates were ruled ineligible for execution because they were mentally disabled and eight were set for resentencing, which could include another death sentence.

The report says 71 death sentences were thrown out by judges for reasons besides mental disability or resentencing.

Ohio, with 146 men and one woman on death row, is in the midst of an unofficial execution moratorium while a federal judge reviews state lethal injection procedures.






Anne

"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

Offline AnneTheBelgian

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Ohio Death Penalty News
« Reply #160 on: April 11, 2012, 09:51:59 AM »
http://www.limaohio.com/news/celeste-82008-death-ohio.html

ONU hosts talk against death penalty

April 10, 2012 10:10 PM

ADA — Dick Celeste's younger brother remembers how the former Ohio governor struggled with capital punishment cases. Now a state legislator from suburban Columbus, Ted Celeste is pushing a law that would keep future governors from having to face the same ordeal.

“Killing somebody to prove you shouldn't kill somebody just doesn't make sense to me,” said state Rep. Ted Celeste, D-Grandview Heights, while speaking Tuesday at Ohio Northern University's Pettit College of Law.

Celeste is sponsoring House Bill 160, which would do away with death sentences in Ohio. Known popularly as the “Execute Justice” bill, H.B. 160 would replace capital punishment with a life sentence and no chance for parole.

Celeste polled his audience made up mostly of law students. More than half said they were opposed to the death penalty; others said they were opposed except in extreme cases.

“This is an unusual mix,” Celeste said. “Generally if you ask that question, are you for or against, in a public opinion poll, you get about 60 percent in favor, 40 against. But if you change the question a bit — if you ask, are you for the death penalty or are you for life without parole as an alternative, it flips.”

Celeste first was elected to the statehouse in 2006, when Gov. Ted Strickland, a Democrat, was pro-death penalty. It was not a good time to pursue legislation his party's governor would oppose.

In 2010, when Gov. John Kasich became governor, Kasich pledged to cut government costs by any means including sentencing reforms. Celeste said he tried to persuade Kasich it costs far less to prosecute life sentences than it does to carry out executions. Depending on the state and the case, it costs from twice as much to 10 times as much to carry a capital case to completion, he said.

“His response was that he'd given it a lot of thought. He said, ‘I got down on my hands and knees and prayed about it,'” Celeste said, adding Kasich said he was at peace about signing death warrants.

“Someone had just given me a book by a former governor, Mike DeSalle from Toledo,” Celeste said. “And his book was about how he'd done the same thing, got down on his hands and knees and prayed about it, and he got a different message.”

Celeste gave the book to Kasich. Kasich assured Celeste he would do everything he could to make sure no mistakes are made, Celeste said.

“Obviously, it was weighing on him,” Celeste added.

Besides the cost, other arguments against capital punishment include:

•Recent advancement in DNA tests that have demonstrated the presence of wrongful convictions.

•Questions raised about equal treatment.

•The unsupported belief that capital punishment serves as a deterrent.

A year ago, U.S. District Judge Gregory Frost delayed the execution of Kevin Smith, citing the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction's failure to explicitly adhere to its execution policies. Frost called the state's lethal-injection procedures “haphazard” and “an embarrassment.”

Frost reversed his ruling after Ohio revised its policy.

A week ago, Frost rejected a motion for a temporary restraining order for Mark Wiles, who is scheduled to be put to death April 18.

There are 155 inmates on Ohio's death row, Celeste said. Had it not been for Frost's moratorium, Ohio would have passed Texas to become the leading state for executions.






Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

Offline AnneTheBelgian

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Ohio Death Penalty News
« Reply #161 on: April 11, 2012, 01:44:47 PM »
http://www.the-news-leader.com/news/article/5177070

Wed Apr 11 2012

CAPITAL NEWS: Death penalty debated as state executions near

about 13 hours ago

CAPITAL NEWS

by Marc Kovac, Capital

Bureau chief: Columbus -- Attorney General Mike DeWine has released the 2011 Capital Crimes Annual Report, the yearly snapshot of Ohio's Death Row, listing facts and figures about inmates who have been executed and those facing death.

It's a timely survey, given the continuing debate over Ohio's administration of the death penalty.

According to the report, a total of 313 death sentences have been issued in Ohio since 1981, a number that includes multiple sentences for some individual inmates.

Of those, the state has executed 46. The first was Wilford Berry on Feb. 19, 1999. The most recent was Reginald Brooks on Nov. 15 of last year.

The average age of executed inmates was 45. Nineteen were black, 27 white, all men, serving an average of more than 16 years on Death Row.

They killed 76 people, including 17 children.

The highest number of executions in recent years was in 2010, when eight inmates received lethal injections. Five more were put to death last year.

Sixteen inmates had their death sentences commuted. Gov. John Kasich has granted clemency twice, for Shawn Hawkins (convicted of a drug-related double murder in Hamilton County in 1989) and Joseph Murphy (convicted of killing an elderly Marion woman in 1987).

Former Govs. Ted Strickland, Bob Taft and Dick Celeste commuted the sentences of five, one and eight Death Row inmates, respectively.

Twenty-two inmates died in prison either of natural causes or suicide prior to their death sentences being carried out.

Eight were deemed mentally retarded and, thus, not eligible for death sentences. Eight are pending resentencing. And 71 had their sentences blocked by judicial action.

That leaves 154 people on Ohio's Death Row, most of whom have been relocated from the Ohio State Penitentiary in Youngstown to the Chillicothe Correctional institution, located about 50 miles south of Columbus.

Four of those received death sentences last year. A dozen have dates set for their lethal injections.

Mark Wiles, convicted in the brutal knifing death of a Portage County teen, is next in line on April 18, pending any additional legal challenges.

Green light

The report was released a few days before a federal court ruled that Ohio could move ahead with Wiles' execution.

But Judge Gregory Frost didn't mince words concerning Ohio and the death penalty.

In a decision earlier this month, he declined a request from legal counsel for Wiles to stop his scheduled execution, opening the door for the Department of Rehabilitation and Correction to restart lethal injections after several months of delays.

But Frost made it clear that prison officials better get it right this time.

He's understandably skeptical, writing in his decision, "Ohio has time and again failed to follow through on its own execution protocol. The protocol is constitutional as written and executions are lawful, but the problem has been Ohio's repeated inability to do what it says it will do."

He added later, "They must recognize the consequences that will ensue if they fail to succeed in conducting a constitutionally sound execution of Wiles. They must recognize what performing a constitutionally sound Wiles execution and then returning to the flawed practices of the past would mean."

Death penalty-free

Two Democratic state lawmakers continue to call for an end to the death penalty in Ohio, "raising fervent opposition" to Judge Frost's decision last week,

Reps. Nickie Antonio, from the Cleveland area, and Ted Celeste, from the Columbus area, are sponsors of legislation that would ban the death penalty, replacing it with life in prison without parole.

Last week, they pointed to Connecticut, the 17th state in the country that has ceased putting inmates to death.

"Moving forward with executions is a step backward for Ohio," Antonio said in a released statement. "Now is the time for Ohio to join policy leaders throughout the country and move to life without parole."

Celeste added, "Connecticut will soon be the fifth state in the past five years to abolish this barbaric, outdated form of punishment. Public opinion is clearly changing with regard to capital punishment, and I am hopeful that Ohio will soon be able to capitalize on this momentum as well."





Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

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PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

Offline Grinning Grim Reaper

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Re: Ohio Death Penalty News
« Reply #162 on: April 19, 2012, 06:56:29 AM »
GO OHIO...

Ohio resumes executions, could regain status as one of country’s busiest death penalty states

By Associated Press, Updated: Thursday, April 19, 2:17 AM

LUCASVILLE, Ohio — Ohio could regain its status as one of the country’s busiest death penalty states, with 11 executions scheduled over the next 20 months, following the resumption of lethal injection in the case of a man who fatally stabbed the 15-year-old son of his former employers.

Wrangling over the state’s execution procedures has delayed the imposition of capital punishment since July, but a federal judge has initially cleared the state to proceed.

On Wednesday, Mark Wiles died by lethal injection at 10:42 a.m., with the inmate using his final words to express hope his death would bring closure to his victim’s family, but also protesting the death penalty.

 “Finally, the state of Ohio should not be in the business of killing its citizens,” Wiles concluded, reading a statement that the warden held over his head. “May God bless us all that fall short.”

It was the 47th execution since Ohio resumed putting inmates to death in 1999, and the state has 11 more executions scheduled, including June, July, September and November.

The next scheduled execution is June 6, when condemned killer Abdul Awkal, 52, is set to die for killing his estranged wife and brother-in-law in 1992, in a room in Cuyahoga County Domestic Relations Court.

Wiles, looking haggard with a sparse, cropped gray beard and shaven head, stared at witnesses for a few moments when he entered the death chamber. A few minutes later, strapped to the gurney and IV lines inserted into his arms, he raised his head and looked at witnesses again.

 “Since this needs to be happening, truly I pray that my dying brings some solace and closure to the Klima family and their loved ones,” he said.

The 49-year-old Wiles also thanked his family for their love and support.

As the lethal sedative began flowing, Wiles nodded, appeared to be speaking, swallowed, spoke again, then gasped a few moments later. Wiles’ stomach rose and fell several times and his head moved slightly, then his mouth fell open and he lay still for several minutes before he was pronounced dead.

John Craig, a cousin of Wiles’ victim Mark Klima and a witness of the execution, appeared briefly before reporters to respond to Wiles’ last words.

 “It’s my opinion that Mark Wiles gave up his citizenship to Ohio when he murdered my cousin and became an inmate, more or less a condemned man,” Craig said.

Wiles, who dropped his final appeal last week, told the Ohio Parole Board that he wasn’t sure he deserved mercy but he was requesting clemency because he had to. Both the parole board and Gov. John Kasich denied Wiles’ request.

Wiles’ defense team had argued he should be spared because he confessed to the crime, showed remorse and had a good prison record.

Wiles was not “the worst of the worst,” and the parole board showed inconsistency in allowing his execution, his public defenders said in a statement.

Records show that Wiles surprised 15-year-old Mark Klima during a burglary at his family’s farmhouse and stabbed him repeatedly with a kitchen knife until he stopped moving.

Wiles paced back and forth and was emotional and anxious in his last minutes in his cell a few steps from the death chamber, prisons spokeswoman JoEllen Smith said. The inmate spent the night on the phone, listening to the radio and writing letters, Smith said. He and two sisters and a brother-in-law cried during emotional visits Wednesday morning, and he also said the rosary with his spiritual adviser, a Roman Catholic priest who works at Ohio’s death row in Chillicothe.

Wiles did not sleep since arriving at the death house Tuesday morning about 9:45 a.m., Smith said.

Ohio’s most recent execution delays stem from inmates’ lawsuits over how well executioners perform their duties.

The state has a review process in place that allows prisons director Gary Mohr to oversee the details and procedures of the execution policy.

Before the execution, Mohr said he was “absolutely confident” in the state’s ability to carry out the procedure properly.

 “We have more documentation on this than anything in my 38 years that I’ve been in this business,” Mohr said. “It’s the most documented execution in the United States of America.”

Andrew Welsh-Huggins can be reached at http://twitter.com/awhcolumbus.
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

Offline Granny B

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Re: Ohio Death Penalty News
« Reply #163 on: April 19, 2012, 08:08:10 AM »
"Wiles, looking haggard with a sparse, cropped gray beard and shaven head, stared at witnesses for a few moments when he entered the death chamber. A few minutes later, strapped to the gurney and IV lines inserted into his arms, he raised his head and looked at witnesses again.

 “Since this needs to be happening, truly I pray that my dying brings some solace and closure to the Klima family and their loved ones,” he said."

Yeah, it needed to happen at least 26 years ago.  You got a lot more time on earth than the poor boy you killed did.  He was only 15, you got 27 years to live after you killed him.  Justice nearly failed that family, and was a helluva long time coming to them.

And yes, I hope it did bring some "solace" to the Klima family, but I guarantee you, it will never bring "closure" to them.  You took away all hope of them ever having "closure" forever! >:(
" Closure? Closure is a misused word in the English language.  There is no such thing as closure for the family of a murder victim.  There will never be any closure for the death of our loved ones until we are dead ourselves.  The families have a lifetime sentence of anguish and sadness." 
Susan Levy

Offline Grinning Grim Reaper

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Re: Ohio Death Penalty News
« Reply #164 on: April 25, 2012, 01:11:31 PM »
Death penalty clemency process might be next target after Portage man's execution

by Mark Kovac
 
RPC Statehouse Bureau
 
Columbus -- Ohio's death penalty clemency process may be the focus of the next round of legal challenges against capital punishment.
 
That was the indication from public defenders and other groups that want the state to stop executing inmates.
 
Minutes after condemned Portage County murderer Mark Wiles breathed his last in the Death Chamber at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville, his legal counsel released a written statement to me and other reporters who witnessed the lethal injection, calling for scrutiny of the state parole board and the governor's office action on the issue.
 
"We challenge the media to review the parole board's collective decisions and find any consistent criteria that might assure the people of Ohio or the inmates themselves that we, as a society, are executing only the worst of the worst," wrote Alan Rossman and Vicki Werneke, two of Wiles' attorneys.
 
"Surely the citizens of Ohio are entitled to at least that much accountability from their chief executive."
 
Wiles, they wrote, was deserving of clemency -- a model prisoner and artist whose drawings were used to comfort terminally ill children, a "son, brother, uncle and friend to many" who was remorseful and accepted his punishment "with grace and dignity."
 
"The clemency process is one facet of Ohio's death penalty system that ought to be reviewed," added Kevin Werner, executive director of Ohioans to Stop Executions, in a written statement.
 
"Right now, the criterion for a favorable or unfavorable clemency recommendation appears to be a guessing game and, at best, a moving target."
 
But Wiles did little to aid his own cause, walking out of an interview with the state parole board and sending a video apology directly to the parents of the Rootstown teen he brutally knifed to death -- a move that was not looked upon favorably by the recipients, the county prosecutor or members of the parole board.
 
"I am asking for clemency because I have to," he told the latter, according to the report the board issued recommending against a sentence reduction to life in prison without the possibility of parole. Then he left the room and didn't return.
 
It's doubtful state officials would have been swayed by what he had to say.
 
In its decision, the parole board noted, "While Wiles does express remorse and admits to committing the offense, that remorse and acceptance of responsibility does not mitigate nor outweigh the brutal attack on a defenseless young man who was beaten and stabbed repeatedly in his own home.
 
"Wiles' remorse, acceptance of responsibility and good institutional conduct do not equate to a substantial enough reason to recommend clemency."
 
POSTSCRIPT TO WILES DEATH
 
Two other thoughts after watching Wiles' die last week:
 
* Though groups are outspoken in opposition to Ohio's administration of the death penalty, few are showing up on execution days to show their support for Death Row inmates.
 
Reporters who were around in 1999 when the state restarted executions recount the droves of news media representatives and protesters who were on hand and the swell of public interest in the process.
 
On the day Wiles was executed, there were 32 chairs set up in the prison visitation room, with only four reporters on hand to fill them. And there were only a couple of people standing outside protesting the event.
 
* All eyes will be on the federal district court judge who delayed two other executions scheduled earlier this year, to see whether state prison officials completed Wiles' execution to the letter of their protocols.
 
Department of Rehabilitation and Correction Director Greg Mohr was confident last week that that was the case.
 
"I am absolutely confident in the entire staff, from Chillicothe that prepped Mr. Wiles to the staff here and to everyone involved... We are committed to compliance," he said, adding later, "We have more documentation on this than anything in my 38 years that I've been in this business. ... I think it's the most documented execution in the United States of America..."
 
Marc Kovac is the Dix Capital Bureau Chief. Email him at mkovac@dixcom.com or on Twitter at OhioCapitalBlog.
 
http://www.auroraadvocate.com/news/article/5181998

 :P :P :P These ANTIs are obviously very poor losers!  :P :P :P
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?