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General Death Penalty => State by State Death Penalty Information and News => Oklahoma Death Penalty News => Topic started by: heidi salazar on February 11, 2010, 01:48:09 AM

Title: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: heidi salazar on February 11, 2010, 01:48:09 AM
Bill Proposes Death For Molesters

OKLAHOMA CITY -- Repeat sex offenders convicted of raping a child 6 years old or younger would be eligible for the death penalty under a bill approved Monday by a House committee, despite a 2008 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that a similar law was unconstitutional.

The bill by Rep. Rex Duncan, R-Sand Springs, was among a host of measures overwhelmingly approved by the House Judiciary Committee that either create new felony crimes or enhance existing criminal penalties.

Duncan, a former prosecutor who chairs the committee, said he believes the Supreme Court erred in its decision and that his proposed law could be upheld by the new members of the court.

"I think they did get it wrong," Duncan said of the Supreme Court's 5-4 decision, "and I would not be surprised if other states revisit their statutes on this issue."

The Supreme Court decision came in a Louisiana case involving 43-year-old Patrick Kennedy, who was sentenced to death for the rape of an 8-year-old girl. The nation's highest court ruled the Louisiana law allowing the death penalty to be imposed in such cases violated the Constitution's ban on cruel and unusual punishment.

In the court's majority opinion, Justice Anthony Kennedy concluded that in cases of crimes against individuals - as opposed to treason, for example - "the death penalty should not be expanded to instances where the victim's life was not taken."

At the time of the ruling, Oklahoma was among five states to explicitly permit such executions.

Duncan said the intent of his bill is to target child rapists who already have a previous conviction for a violent sex offense.

"If that's what the bill says, the bill is facially unconstitutional," said Randall Coyne, a constitutional law professor at the University of Oklahoma. "The court can change its mind, and it often does ... but I doubt the court would overturn so recent a decision."

State Rep. Ryan Kiesel, the lone opposing vote against the measure, said he agrees child rapists should be handed harsh penalties but questioned the wisdom of a measure that clearly violate a Supreme Court ruling.

"I think it would be a terrible waste of time and money for a district attorney in the state of Oklahoma to seek that punishment and then see that as an appeal issue and take a long time to wind through the courts, putting an additional emotional burden on the victims and their families," said Kiesel, D-Seminole.

Another bill passed by the panel would require couples to receive at least one hour of marital counseling before they could obtain a divorce in Oklahoma

http://www.koco.com/news/22510439/detail.html
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: heidi salazar on March 02, 2010, 06:02:20 AM
House passes death penalty bill

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - Oklahoma lawmakers have voted overwhelmingly to force repeat child molesters to face possible penalties of life in prison or death.

The House voted 91-2 Monday for the bill by Rep. Rex Duncan of Sand Springs and sent it to the Senate for action.

Under current law, a child molester can face a sentence of 25 years to life in prison for a first offense. Duncan's legislation will increase the penalty to include a maximum sentence of life without parole.

It would also allow repeat offenders to face life without parole or the death penalty.

Duncan says the death penalty is reserved for the worst of the worst criminals. He says he believes people with a history of violently raping children fall into that category




Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: ScoopD (aka: Pam) on March 02, 2010, 09:42:45 AM
Bravo Oklahoma, excellent idea though I don't see this actually making it, it will be an appellate lawyers wet dream.


On a side note: I have often wondered this, what difference does the age of the victim make?
When a bullet is coming towards you or an ax is swinging down on you or a knife is slicing through you, does it really matter the age you are? At that point in time I think every victim is equal - they are all at the mercy of their attacker.  :'(
Title: Oklahoma Senate panel OKs death penalty for child rapists
Post by: heidi salazar on March 17, 2010, 09:04:19 PM
Senate panel OKs death penalty for child rapists

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - The Oklahoma Legislature is pushing forward a bill to allow the death penalty for child rapists, despite a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling that such a penalty is unconstitutional.

A Senate committee on Wednesday passed a bill already approved in the House that authorizes the death penalty for anyone convicted of a second offense of raping a child age 6 or younger.

Senate author Anthony Sykes says he hopes the law might be upheld since the court makeup has changed since its 2008 ruling that a similar law in Louisiana was unconstitutional.

In that 5-4 decision, the court ruled the death penalty is restricted to murder and crimes against the state, like espionage and treason.

Legal scholars say it's unlikely the Oklahoma law would be upheld.


http://www.connectamarillo.com/news/news_story.aspx?id=431133

You're right Pam, it probably will not make it all the way through to become an aggravating factor for the death penalty, but hopefully it will result in longer sentences for child rapist!
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Anne on June 02, 2010, 08:19:00 AM
http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/article.aspx?subjectid=16&articleid=20100601_11_0_OKLAHO770598

Change in execution procedure allowed under bill sent to Oklahoma governor

By BARBARA HOBEROCK World Capitol Bureau
Published: 6/1/2010  9:22 PM
Last Modified: 6/1/2010  9:22 PM

OKLAHOMA CITY -- A bill sent to Gov. Brad Henry's desk would give the Oklahoma Department of Corrections more flexibility in carrying out executions.

House Bill 2266 also would put restrictions on whom the Oklahoma Indigent Defense System could represent.

Current state law directs the Department of Corrections to use "an ultra-short acting barbiturate in combination with a chemical paralytic agent." The new legislation would strike the language specifying what type of drugs must be used.

The new language would give the DOC more flexibility to make changes to the execution protocol if medical procedures change or a court determines a problem exists, attorney general spokesman Charlie Price said Tuesday.

The state's lethal injection method has been challenged and was upheld, Price said.

Oklahoma uses sodium thiopental to cause unconsciousness, vecuronium bromide to stop breathing and potassium chloride to stop the heart.

DOC Director Justin Jones said sodium thiopental is an older-generation drug that is in short supply.

Newer drugs are becoming available, Jones said.

Ninety-two state inmates, including three women, have been executed by lethal injection. The first was Muskogee County killer Charles Troy Coleman on Sept. 10, 1990.

Before that, 82 inmates were executed using electrocution.

McClain County death-row inmate Jeffrey David Matthews is scheduled for execution June 17.

HB 2266 also would prohibit district judges from appointing Oklahoma Indigent Defense System lawyers to represent criminal defendants who
post bail and get out of jail while their cases are pending, unless that representation is paid for out of the local court fund.

The measure would not affect Tulsa and Oklahoma counties, which have separate public defender systems.

Rep. Rex Duncan, R-Sand Springs, the House sponsor, said the measure would reduce the cost of legal services to taxpayers.

Duncan is running for district attorney in Pawnee and Osage counties.

Joe Robertson, OIDS executive director, said the bill is designed to reduce the agency's caseload.

"Our caseloads have been climbing even though criminal filings are down," Robertson said. "A larger percentage of the accused are indigent."

The measure likely will not impact a requirement that the system provide adequate representation, he said.

"The court still has the authority to make an appointment, but it will be paid out of court funds rather than by OIDS," Robertson said.

By BARBARA HOBEROCK World Capitol Bureau










Anne
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: heidi salazar on September 07, 2010, 12:31:13 PM
Lethal injection made its debut in Oklahoma 20 years ago

The killing got off to a late start.

Witnesses who'd gathered at the state penitentiary in McAlester expected Charles Troy Coleman to commence dying at 12:02 a.m. That's when the execution was set to start.

As the clock ticked toward a quarter after the hour, though, prison officials remained quiet. Some observers worried that something was amiss. Others wondered whether the Supreme Court had stepped in or whether the governor had issued a last-minute stay.

About 12:15 a.m., the dozen media witnesses were escorted into a viewing room. There would be a death that night, after all. Curtains opened, and Coleman, a murderer, could be seen inside the death chamber. He was lying on a gurney. A sheet covered his body, but his head was exposed.

The execution began 10 minutes later.

Art Cox, of the Enid News & Eagle, who witnessed it, described Coleman's end as a "very easy death ... a very cold death, very antiseptic." Warden James Saffle said Coleman died quickly.

Joe Ward, an investigator for the public defender's office who had come to know and like Coleman, perceived it differently.

"I saw him choke and gasp and struggle for air," Ward said. "It looked like he was choking to death. He looked over ... and mouthed the words, 'I love you.' Then he looked straight back up and started choking."

He was pronounced dead at 12:35 a.m.

It was Sept. 10, 1990. Oklahoma had executed its first prisoner by lethal injection.

Over the next two decades, the state would employ the drug cocktail 91 more times, executing more people in that span than in the preceding 75 years. Three were women. Additional convicts are scheduled to die this year.

The federal government and the 35 states with the death penalty use lethal injection as the primary form of execution, and it has been used on 1,050 prisoners nationwide, including Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh.

But it -- like the death penalty itself -- has spurred ardent debate, and condemned prisoners continue to file appeals claiming that state-sanctioned drug deaths are unconstitutional and cruel.

Twenty years after Coleman's death, the method remains as controversial as ever.

'Most humane'

Coleman was the only Oklahoma convict put to death in 1990 and the first since James French was electrocuted in 1966.

The death penalty was suspended by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1972. The court declared in Furman v. Georgia that Georgia's death penalty system violated the Eighth Amendment, which protects against cruel and unusual punishment. The court's decision stopped executions nationwide and commuted the sentences of hundreds of condemned prisoners.

The ban didn't last. States changed their death penalty laws to avoid the constitutional problems cited by the court, and in 1977, Utah executed Gary Gilmore by firing squad.

That same year, Oklahoma became the first state to establish lethal injection as a method of execution. Dr. Jay Chapman, Oklahoma's first medical examiner, devised the recipe that still is used in most states today.

"The proposal was for three drugs," he said recently. "Some people have termed it a cocktail. It starts with an ultra short-acting barbiturate, which renders the individual unconscious, then the vecuronium bromide, which paralyzes, and then the third drug, potassium chloride, which stops the heart."

Lethal injection was developed as the "most humane" way to end life, he said.

"It could not be construed as cruel and unusual punishment since it is merely the extreme of procedures done daily around the world for surgical procedures," Chapman said. "It's simply an extreme form of anesthesia."

Condemned prisoners insist that Chapman is wrong.

According to the Death Penalty Information Center: "Those raising lethal injection challenges (both those executed and those stayed) are generally claiming that the drugs used in the executions cause extreme and unnecessary pain, and that the combination of chemicals masks the pain being experienced by the inmate from the sight of those administering the death penalty."

Some prisoners have had dramatic reactions to the drugs. In 1992, Oklahoman killer Robyn Lee Parks took 11 minutes to die. The Oklahoman's Don Mecoy, who witnessed Parks' death, wrote:

"Parks was blinking and nervously licking his lips when he gasped and violently gagged. His head jerked toward his right shoulder, turning away from the gathered witnesses as he lapsed into unconsciousness. He groaned as his girlfriend, Debra Sutton, cried out: 'This isn't real. This isn't real. Oh God, it isn't real.'"

Scott Carpenter, also a murderer, was executed in Oklahoma in 1997. Oklahoman reporter Tony Thornton wrote: "His body made 18 violent convulsions, followed by eight milder ones, before the life drained from him."

Most, however, slip quietly into unconsciousness and death, and state Corrections Department spokesman Jerry Massie said he is unaware of any "major issues" resulting from lethal injections.

"We've had some occasions where they had more of a physical reaction to it, according to the witnesses, and we've had some issues with finding a vein at times, usually with intravenous drug users, but we've been able to resolve those," he said.

Legal challenges

In 2008, the U.S. Supreme Court validated the use of the three-drug cocktail but foresaw further arguments on the issue, the Death Penalty Information Center noted.

"I assumed that our decision would bring the debate about lethal injection as a method of execution to a close," Justice John Paul Stevens wrote in an opinion. "It now seems clear that it will not. ... Instead of ending the controversy, I am now convinced that this case will generate debate not only about the constitutionality of the three-drug protocol ... but also about the justification for the death penalty itself."

Most recently, a federal judge issued a 60-day stay of execution hours before Oklahoma prisoner Jeffrey David Matthews was to die on Aug. 17.

At issue was the Corrections Department's plan to use a different barbiturate than usual: Brevital, a form of methohexital sodium, instead of sodium thiopental. Manufacturing problems have caused a national shortage of the latter drug.

"We had it," Massie said. "I don't know if it expired or what, but when we had it tested, we weren't satisfied with the quality of it."

Defense attorneys argued that Brevital never has been used in executions and is not an acceptable alternative. The state said the drug meets the statutory requirement for an ultra short-acting barbiturate.

The Corrections Department now has obtained more sodium thiopental. The attorney general has asked the judge to lift the stay of execution. If the judge complies, the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals will set a new execution date.

http://newsok.com/lethal-injection-made-its-debut-in-oklahoma-20-years-ago/article/3492556


Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Jeff1857 on September 13, 2010, 05:12:24 PM
Shortage of death penalty drug in Oklahoma delays executions


A nationwide shortage of a sedative used in Oklahoma's lethal injection cocktails has delayed executions, spurred legal battles and prompted state prison officials to try to find substitute drugs.

The execution chamber at the Washington State Penitentiary is shown as viewed from the witness gallery, in this Nov. 20, 2008, file photo, in Walla Walla, Wash. Cal Coburn Brown is scheduled to die Friday, Sept. 10, 2010, for the murder of Holly Washa in 1991. If the execution is carried out, Brown will be the first person executed in Washington since 2001. AP Photo

MultimediaPhotoview all photos
Shortage of death penalty drug in Oklahoma delays executions The problems will continue into next year, as the manufacturer of the sedative, sodium thiopental, won't have more of the anesthetic on the market until then.

In Oklahoma, the sedative's shortage could affect as many as four executions. One execution already has been stayed and another is scheduled but with a substitute drug. Further, the state attorney general's office is likely to request before 2011 that two more executions be set.

State prison officials already have twice planned to use alternative sedatives. The first switch announced last month caused a federal judge to stay an execution on the day the inmate was set to die.

In another case, officials announced last week the planned use of a different substitute drug, which could lead to another stay and a lawsuit. A federal public defender claimed the Corrections Department is arbitrarily making life and death decisions.

"They're making up their protocol based on what is available at the time," Oklahoma Western District Federal Public Defender Susan M. Otto told a judge. "We have no assurance what they plan to do today is what will happen."

State Corrections Department spokesman Jerry Massie said the decisions are based on consultations with other corrections departments.

"There are people out there that can give you advice," he said.

Of the 35 states that allow the death penalty, nearly all use sodium thiopental as part of the lethal cocktail, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.

Late last month, Kentucky announced it would not be able to carry out two of three scheduled lethal injections because the state has only enough sodium thiopental for one. In Ohio and Washington a large overdose of sodium thiopental is the only drug administered during lethal injections.

While several states' laws indicate the drugs to be used during lethal injection, Oklahoma law calls for an ultra short-acting barbiturate without specifying a drug.

Oklahoma's protocol for lethal injection is for the sedative to be administered first, followed by a drug to stop breathing and then a drug to stop the heart. Up until last month, the usual sedative was sodium thiopental.

Hospira, based outside Chicago, is the sole U.S. manufacturer of sodium thiopental. The shortage occurred because of an issue with a third-party supplier, company spokeswoman Tareta Adams said.

"What we're dealing with is a supply issue of the active ingredient," she said. "From a sales point of view, it's not a big product for us."

The drug -- manufactured and used for 60 years as an anesthetic agent for surgeries and other procedures -- should be back on the market in early 2011, Adams said.

Sodium thiopental was to be used on Oklahoma death row inmate Jeffrey David Matthews until corrections officials learned the only dose had expired, according to court records.

Matthews, 38, was scheduled for lethal injection Aug. 17 for murdering Otis Short, 77, during a 1994 McClain County burglary.

A federal judge stayed Matthews' execution after his attorneys raised concerns about the substitute sedative. Prison officials later obtained a dose of sodium thiopental, but the judge said there could be other issues and kept an Oct. 15 hearing and would not lift the stay to expire on Oct. 16.

Two days before Matthews' stay expires, Donald Ray Wackerly II, 40, is scheduled to be executed for the 1996 murder of Pan Sayakhoummane, 51, during a Sequoyah County robbery.

Assistant Attorney General Greg Metcalfe told the judge the dose of sodium thiopental is earmarked for Matthews and the Corrections Department plans to use another sedative, pentobarbital, for Wackerly's execution. Veterinarians use pentobarbital for animal euthanasia and it is the legal drug for physician-assisted suicide in Oregon.

The judge noted Wackerly's right to file a lawsuit challenging the use pentobarbital. As of Friday afternoon, Wackerly had not filed a lawsuit.

Before the year ends, the state attorney general's office may ask the state Court of Criminal Appeals to set two execution dates, said spokeswoman Emily Lang. John David Duty faces execution for the 2001 strangulation death of his cellmate in 2001; and Billy Alverson faces execution for the 1995 fatal beating of a store clerk in Tulsa.


http://newsok.com/shortage-of-death-penalty-drug-in-oklahoma-delays-executions/article/3494371
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: AnneTheBelgian on March 22, 2011, 08:13:32 PM
http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/article.aspx?subjectid=298&articleid=20110322_298_0_OLHMIY953219

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Bill OKs substitute drugs for executions

By Associated Press

Published: 3/22/2011  2:15 PM

Last Modified: 3/22/2011  2:15 PM

OKLAHOMA CITY -- Oklahoma prison officials will have more flexibility to substitute the lethal drugs used to execute condemned inmates under a bill approved by a Senate panel.

The Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday unanimously approved a bill that authorizes the Department of Corrections to use a lethal quantity of "drug or drugs" to execute inmates. Existing law requires the department to use an ultrashort acting barbiturate in combination with a paralytic agent.

The state of Oklahoma had for years used the anesthetic sodium thiopental as the first in a three-drug cocktail to carry out the death penalty. But Oklahoma substituted pentobarbital last year after a nationwide shortage of sodium thiopental.

DOC general counsel Michael Oakley says the department has no plans to change its current protocol, which has been upheld in court.
















Anne
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: AnneTheBelgian on October 11, 2011, 06:45:34 PM
http://www.durantdemocrat.com/view/full_story/16001334/article-Oklahoma-group-pushes-for-repeal-of-death-penalty-?instance=home_news_lead

Oklahoma group pushes for repeal of death penalty

by Sean Murphy, Associated Press

1 hr 26 mins ago

2011 Durant Daily Democrat.

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) -- A group of religious leaders and academics cited Oklahoma's frequency in imposing the death penalty and the number of condemned inmates who have been exonerated as reasons Monday to halt executions in the state.

The Oklahoma Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty held a community roundtable at the Capitol as part of the 9th annual World Day Against the Death Penalty.

"Executions, regardless of the method used, are cruel and inhumane, and can and have gone wrong in many cases," said Kenny Fikes, co-chairman of the coalition.

The Rev. Edward Weisenburger of the Cathedral of Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Oklahoma City said religious leaders have a responsibility to speak out against the death penalty.

"Human life, in all its stages, is sacred," Weisenburger said.

Oklahoma has executed 96 inmates since 1976, putting the state third behind Texas and Virginia, according to the Death Penalty Information Center. But when weighted for population, Oklahoma leads the nation in both executions and death row exonerations, said Susan Sharp, a death penalty researcher at the University of Oklahoma.

"We're the state with the highest per-capita execution rate and the highest per-capita wrongful conviction rate," Sharp said. "There's something wrong with that picture."

But there has been little support for abolishing the death penalty among Oklahoma's political leaders.

Trent Baggett with the District Attorneys Council said Oklahoma prosecutors are opposed to any effort to abolish the death penalty.

"They believe that while it's not appropriate in all cases, there are certain cases where the death penalty is appropriate," Baggett said.

He also said prosecutors take death penalty cases very seriously and carefully scrutinize those cases for which they intend to seek the ultimate punishment.

"It's not something that's done willy-nilly and without a lot of thought and deliberation," Baggett said.

Proponents of abolishing the death penalty acknowledge they face an uphill battle in the Legislature but said that won't deter them.

"I wasn't called to be successful. I was called to be faithful," said Rev. Stan Basler of the Oklahoma Conference of Churches. "I hope that the day will never come when we become silent just because the odds are against us."
















Anne

Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: JTiscool on November 04, 2011, 09:34:57 AM
So what's going on with this movement? Did it fail yet?

Just saw a case on forensic files. Anthony Sanchez who was convicted of murdering University of Oklahoma dance student Jewell "Juli" Busken.
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Granny B on November 04, 2011, 08:15:10 PM


People in Oklahoma are for the death penalty.  Just more antis blowing their horns, sticking their long Pinocchio noses in where it does not belong.
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on November 05, 2012, 04:15:15 PM
DOC officers fired in prison inmate's death

By CARY ASPINWALL World Staff Writer
Published: 11/5/2012  2:23 AM
Last Modified: 11/5/2012  7:21 AM

An inmate who died of smoke inhalation at Oklahoma State Penitentiary in July was left alone for more than an hour after officers first reported smoke in his cell and the prison's fire alarm was turned off at the time, records show.

Investigations revealed it took more than an hour to remove inmate Julius Parker's near-lifeless body from his cell after he set fire to his mattress about 1:30 p.m. July 28, according to documents obtained by the Tulsa World.  ;D

Parker, 26, remained alone in his cell as the fire smoldered until an emergency response team entered about 2:45 p.m. and attempted unsuccessfully to revive him.

As a result, at least four correctional officers at the maximum-security prison have been fired, two others have resigned and several policy changes have been made to improve safety and accountability, records show.

Larry Jiles, a security manager, received a report from a security officer about 1:50 p.m. that there was smoke coming from Parker's cell on H Unit, according to his Sept. 13 termination letter. The H Unit is OSP's maximum-security wing housing death-row inmates and violent offenders in long-term administrative segregation due to misconducts and escape attempts.

Jiles chose to end his shift and leave the prison grounds, instead of alerting anyone to the fire, records show.

"You took no responsibility as to what was happening during your tour of duty and left without reporting any information to your supervisors," his termination letter states.

He reportedly told investigators he didn't check on it "because inmates build fires to heat up coffee all the time. I didn't think it was that severe."

Department of Corrections spokesman Jerry Massie said officers noticed smoke in Parker's cell but "did not recognize the magnitude of the situation."

"When officers reported the smoke to the supervisors, the officers again did not convey the seriousness of situation - which delayed the response to the offender's cell," Massie said.

According to a prison incident report, Parker was removed from his cell after the 2:45 p.m. welfare check, placed in restraints and taken on a gurney to the prison's medical unit. Prison nursing staff started CPR to revive Parker, then an ambulance took him to a McAlester hospital, where he was pronounced dead.  :P

Parker was serving time out of Tulsa County for convictions on armed robbery and other charges.

Massie said he did not know whether functioning fire alarms would have made a difference in the outcome.

In addition to Jiles, the fired employees include correctional security officer David Willis, correctional security manager Beatrice Glover and safety consultant Jerry Hunt.

In Hunt's Aug. 27 termination letter, Warden Randall Workman notes investigators found the fire alarms had been tampered with, and Hunt misstated how recently they had been checked.

"When questioned, you stated that you had checked the alarms in the week previous to the incident. Upon checking you then stated it could have been 'two or three weeks.' In fact the tampering had occurred on June 24, 2012, which had been over a month before the incident. Failure to carry out inspections of these systems is a failure of our most basic mission to protect the public, the staff and the offender."

Attempts by the World to reach the fired employees for comment were unsuccessful.

A check of the fire alarm panel history found that the panel's last event was June 24, and then it was powered up July 28 - which meant required safety checks were not being performed. Safety reports issued after Parker's death note that Hunt failed to conduct monthly inspections as required by policy from January through July 2012.

A memo issued from the warden's office two days after Parker's death states: "Effective immediately, the status of Fire Alarm Systems at each location will be logged by each shift and any issues reported to the Shift Supervisor Any system found inoperable will be reported to the Duty Officer, Safety Officer and facility head with the fire watch initiated."

An Aug. 13 interoffice memo between DOC Deputy Director David Parker and Workman notes several inaccuracies in record keeping and policy violations in relation to inmate Parker's death.

Workman is currently out on medical leave. The employees who were fired have the right to appeal their termination through the Oklahoma Merit Protection Commission.

www.tulsaworld.com
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on December 19, 2012, 07:51:40 PM
December 19, 2012
Man sentenced to death for killings

OKLAHOMA CITY -- A Blanchard man was sentenced to death Tuesday for the killings of a Dibble woman and her two children.

McClain County District Judge Greg Dixon followed the jury's sentencing recommendations for Shaun Michael Bosse, who was convicted Oct. 29 on three counts of first-degree murder and one count of first-degree arson for the July 23, 2010, deaths of 25-year-old Katrina Griffin, 8-year-old Christian Griffin and 6-year-old Chasity Hammer.

Dixon sentenced Bosse, 30, to death on each of the murder counts, plus an additional 35 years in prison and a $25,000 fine on the arson charge, the maximum penalty, Assistant District Attorney Lori Puckett said.

Bosse's execution is scheduled for Feb. 28, but Puckett said that date will be postponed during an automatic round of appeals for the conviction and sentences.

Bosse, who did not testify in his own defense during his trial, said nothing before the sentences were handed down, Puckett said. Members of the victims' family attended the sentencing hearing, she said.

Meanwhile, Bosse's defense attorney, Gary Henry of the Oklahoma Indigent Defense System, said Bosse is hopeful he'll successfully appeal his convictions and sentences.

"His spirits are good. He is actually pretty positive," Henry said. "He's hopeful that something comes from that."

Henry said Bosse's first round of appeals was filed immediately after Tuesday's sentencing hearing.

The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner ruled that Griffin died from multiple sharp force trauma, while Christian died from multiple stab wounds. The medical examiner report says Chasity died from smoke inhalation and burns in the fire. Prosecutors said Chastity was thrown into a closet and a chair was used to block the door.

Prosecutors said DNA evidence showed the victims' blood was on Bosse's clothing. Scratches on his knuckles and arm and pawn tickets in his wallet indicated he hocked some of the nearly 140 items taken from the family's home, according to prosecutors.

Henry argued there was no evidence Bosse committed the crimes.

Witnesses testified that a McClain County deputy visited the victims' mobile home shortly before midnight the day before they died and that Bosse was there. But Henry said Bosse was observed in Oklahoma City the following morning and had been there for several hours when smoke was reported to be rising from the burning mobile home.

http://normantranscript.com/headlines/x983996528/Man-sentenced-to-death-for-killings
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on December 29, 2012, 10:28:43 PM
Okla. AG wants convicted killer's appeal dismissed

Posted December 28, 2012 at 3:18 p.m.

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) -- The Oklahoma Attorney General's Office is urging a Delaware County judge to dismiss the latest appeal of a man sentenced to life in prison for the death of a Missouri banker.

Shannon Wayne Agofsky was convicted in the death of Dan Short in October 1989. Prosecutors say Short was abducted from his northwest Arkansas home and taken to the State Bank of Noel, Mo., where he was forced to open the vault.

Short was then driven into northeast Oklahoma, tied to a weighted chair and dumped alive into Grand Lake near Grove. His body was found five days later.

Agofsky has filed a motion to set aside his murder conviction and life sentence. He is currently on federal death row in Terre Haute, Ind., for stomping another inmate to death.

http://www.timesrecordnews.com/news/2012/dec/28/okla-ag-wants-convicted-killers-appeal-dismissed/
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on January 02, 2013, 12:30:39 AM
Oklahoma death-row inmate dies of suspected natural causes

McALESTER -- Authorities say a death-row inmate at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary has died of apparent natural causes.
Published: January 1, 2013

McALESTER -- Authorities say a death-row inmate at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary has died of apparent natural causes.

The Oklahoma Department of Corrections says 64-year-old Karl Myers was found unresponsive Friday in the medical unit at the prison in McAlester. The department says Myers pronounced dead a short time later.

A Tulsa television station reports that Myers was sentenced to death for the 1996 killing of Cindy Marzano of Broken Arrow.

Myers has been on death row since his 1998 conviction. He also served time in Oklahoma and Kansas for burglary, assault and rape before he was arrested in Rogers County for Marzano's death.

http://newsok.com/okla.-inmate-dies-of-suspected-natural-causes/article/3742302
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on January 05, 2013, 12:26:16 AM
DA to seek death penalty in Tulsa shootings

By JUSTIN JUOZAPAVICIUS | Associated Press Published January 04, 2013

TULSA, Okla. - Prosecutors said Friday they would seek the death penalty against two Tulsa men charged in an April 2012 shooting rampage that killed three black people and left two others wounded.

Jake England, 20, and Alvin Watts, 33, are charged with first-degree murder in what authorities describe as the racially motivated killings of William Allen, Bobby Clark and Dannaer Fields, who were shot over Easter weekend as they walked near their homes.

England and Watts, who also face hate crimes charges, are due to be arraigned Wednesday in district court. Under Oklahoma law, the potential punishment on each of the murder charges is either life in prison with parole, life without parole or the death penalty.

"The defendants are presumed to be innocent under the law but we will be prepared to present our evidence at future due process hearings," District Attorney Tim Harris said in a statement Friday.

Attorneys for both men said Friday they had hoped prosecutors would have decided against seeking the death penalty.

"I'm always disappointed when it is filed because I'm against the death penalty, but that's a part of the world I live in," said Shena Burgess, one of Watts' public defenders.

Clark Brewster, who is handling England's defense pro bono, said he still held "some degree of hope" for his client despite Friday's announcement.

"We'll be very, very well prepared and very careful in our defense of this young man," Brewster said. "He's only 20 years old. I never think killing is a good idea, on either side."

The shootings happened in a predominantly black section of Tulsa - not far from where one of the nation's worst race riots happened more than 90 years ago - and all five victims were black.

Authorities have said England may have targeted black people because he wanted to avenge the death of his father, who was shot by a black man in 2010. But England, who describes himself as Cherokee Indian, has said he has no ill will toward black people.

The senior pastor at the First Baptist Church North Tulsa, where civil rights leader the Rev. Jesse Jackson spoke in the days following the shootings, said the trial will provide "some sense of satisfaction."

"Obviously, it won't bring back those who unfortunately perished, but I'm just happy to see justice and two young men being brought to trial," Anthony Scott said.

At a hearing in July, England's uncle testified that England and Watts treated the mass shootings as a contest. Timothy Hoey said Watts told him a day after the killings that Watts and England each shot two people and England shot the fifth victim "that would break the tie," Hoey said.

Hoey also testified that the day after the shootings, England used racial slurs to describe whom they shot. During that emotional testimony, England and Watts were stone-faced, sometimes looking down at the floor.

Cindy Wilde, the mother of England's ex-girlfriend, said Friday she had hoped prosecutors would seek life in prison for England instead of capital punishment. But, she added, she's turned everything "over to the Lord" because she can't bear wrestling with the crimes England is accused of committing anymore.

"That's the only way I can get on with my life is to give it up to Him," she said. "I can't deal with it. It's God's choice on what happens now."

http://www.theolympian.com/2013/01/04/2373292/da-to-seek-death-penalty-in-tulsa.html
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on January 07, 2013, 10:13:24 PM
Supreme Court rejects appeal of Oklahoma death row inmate
Without comment, the high court declined to hear the case of Steven Ray Thacker, whose crime spree in late 1999 and early 2000 left three dead
Published: January 7, 2013

WASHINGTON _ The Supreme Court on Monday rejected an appeal from Oklahoma death row inmate Steven Ray Thacker, whose crime spree in late 1999 and early 20000 included the deaths of people in Oklahoma, Missouri and Tennessee.

Thacker is on death row in Oklahoma for the kidnapping, rape and murder of Laci Dawn Hill, of Bixby, who was 25 when Thacker stabbed her to death on Dec. 23, 1999. Thacker had gone to Hill's house to rob her in order to buy Christmas presents for his family, according to court documents.

Thacker, who pleaded guilty in Hill's killing, lost the state court appeals of his sentence and has now lost his federal appeals.

After killing Hill, Thacker fled to Missouri, where he car-jacked a family and then killed a man and stole his car. During a multi-state manhunt, Thacker drove the car to Tennessee and killed a tow truck driver before being captured.

He was given a death sentence for killing the tow truck driver in Tennessee, and a life sentence for stabbing the Missouri man.

The Supreme Court, without comment, declined to hear Thacker's federal appeal. The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals confirmed his sentence last April.

http://newsok.com/supreme-court-rejects-appeal-of-oklahoma-death-row-inmate/article/3743910
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: JTiscool on January 09, 2013, 08:36:30 AM
They profiled that guy on the show "fatal encounters" a few weeks ago. Can't wait until he goes  >:(
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on January 09, 2013, 06:57:26 PM
Oklahoma Attorney General Pruitt requests execution date for multi-state killings

Posted: 01/07/2013

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) -- Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt has asked the state Court of Criminal Appeals to set an execution date for a death-row inmate convicted of killing people in three states.

Pruitt asked the court on Monday to set an execution date for Steven Ray Thacker, hours after the U.S. Supreme rejected Thacker's appeal.

Thacker pleaded guilty in Oklahoma to first-degree murder and other charges in the December 1999 stabbing death of 25-year-old Laci Dawn Hill of Bixby. Thacker received the death penalty after a sentencing hearing.

Thacker was also sentenced to death in Tennessee for the January 2000 killing of a tow truck driver and to life in prison in the January 2000 death of a Missouri man.

Defense attorney Frank Bauman did not return a telephone call seeking comment.

http://www.kjrh.com/dpp/news/local_news/bixby/oklahoma-attorney-general-pruitt-requests-execution-date-for-multi-state-killings
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on January 12, 2013, 09:52:04 AM
Court upholds death sentence in trooper's killing
Posted: Jan 12, 2013 12:41 AM Updated: Jan 12, 2013 12:41 AM

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - A state appeals court has upheld the death sentence of a man accused of gunning down a state highway patrolman in 2003.

The Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals on Friday affirmed the death sentence of 38-year-old Ricky Ray Malone. Malone was convicted of shooting trooper Nikky "Nik" Green twice in the back of the head after wresting Green's gun from him during a struggle on a Cotton County road. Green was trying to arrest Malone for allegedly operating a mobile methamphetamine lab out of the car he was driving, and some of the attack was captured on Green's vehicle's dashboard camera.

Malone's attorney had urged the court to instead give Malone a life term, arguing that a judge didn't account for mitigating circumstances when re-sentencing Malone to death.

http://www.ktul.com/story/20567575/court-upholds-death-sentence-in-troopers-killing
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: PAPASTALKIN on January 12, 2013, 06:03:21 PM
Makes me wanna build a house on the Tx,Ak,Ok border
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on January 15, 2013, 07:14:29 PM
January 15, 2013
Court rejects appeal of convicted OKC killer

Associated Press

-- OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) -- A federal appeals court on Monday rejected the appeal of a man sentenced to death for killing two Oklahoma City women more than 25 years ago.

The U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver rejected claims by Ronald Lott, 53, who was convicted in December 2001 of raping and killing Anna Laura Fowler, 83, in September 1986 and Zelma Cutler, 93, in January 1987. His trial was delayed several times.

Lott was sentenced to death in January 2002 for both murder convictions.

Lott's attorney did not immediately return a phone call seeking comment.

The appeals court rejected several arguments by Lott, including ineffective counsel during the sentencing phase of the trial, prosecutorial misconduct, insufficient evidence, erroneous jury instructions and violation of his right to a speedy trial.

The court did agree with Lott's contention that the victim impact testimony by the granddaughter of one victim, who testified that she believed Lott should be put to death, should not have been allowed. But the court found that because of "overwhelming evidence of Lott's guilt" the testimony "did not have a substantial and injurious effect" on the jury's decision to impose the death sentence.

The evidence against Lott included DNA taken from the victims that was matched to Lott.

http://muskogeephoenix.com/statenews/x503822491/Court-rejects-appeal-of-convicted-OKC-killer
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on January 15, 2013, 09:20:54 PM
Pruitt asked the court on Monday to set an execution date for Steven Ray Thacker, hours after the U.S. Supreme rejected Thacker's appeal.

Ya gotta love OK justice...Pruit doesn't let the grass grow under his feet!  Are you paying attention Florida?
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on February 20, 2013, 08:33:57 PM
Prosecutors seek death penalty in 'Cathouse' case
February 20, 2013

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) -- The former girlfriend of a man accused of killing four people, including a prostitute featured on HBO's "Cathouse" series, testified Tuesday she overheard him plan the Oklahoma City shootings because he was unhappy with the amount of money he made from a drug dealer among those killed.

Denny Edward Phillips, 34, is charged in the deaths of drug dealer Casey Mark Barrientos and three others, including two pregnant women. One of the victims was Brooke Phillips, who had worked for a legal Nevada brothel featured on HBO. She was not related to Denny Phillips.

In testimony at Denny Phillips' preliminary hearing Tuesday, his former girlfriend testified Phillips and a second man, David Allen Tyner, planned to kill Barrientos, 32, because they were unhappy with their take from Barrientos' drug trade.

"They were going to kill Casey and anybody who was in the house," Karine Sanders testified in Oklahoma County District Court. "I almost felt threatened by it."

Investigators say Barrientos ran a drug and prostitution ring out of the south Oklahoma City house where the victims were killed. Denny Phillips and Tyner, 31, allegedly were involved in illegal drug sales with Barrientos.

Sanders said she dated Denny Phillips during the summer of 2009 and that they frequently visited the house.

"It was like a party house," she said. "A lot of strippers. A lot of drugs. A lot of drinking."

She said there was also a lot of money lying around and that many who visited the house were armed.

A resident of the house who survived, Jose Fiero, testified that he saw Tyner walk into the home where the victims were shot but never saw Denny Phillips.

Previous testimony indicates that Phillips told a fellow inmate at a federal prison that he was nearby when the victims were killed, but not actually present.

Denny Phillips faces six counts of murder because Brooke Phillips, 22, and Milagros Barrera, 22, were pregnant when they were killed. All of the victims, including Barrientos and Jennifer Ermey, 25, were shot and stabbed and their bodies were set on fire.

The preliminary hearing, which began last week, will determine whether there is probable cause that Denny Phillips was involved in the shootings and should be tried for murder. It's scheduled to resume Feb. 26.

Denny Phillips has pleaded not guilty to the charges. Prosecutors said Tuesday they will seek the death penalty if he is convicted.

Tyner, whom Sanders identified as her cousin, worked as Barrientos' bodyguard and complained to Denny Phillips that he was not being paid enough, Sanders said. Denny Phillips was also not happy with the amount of money he made from drug deals with Barrientos, she said.

"Let's do something about it," Sanders testified Denny Phillips said at one point during a conversation with Tyner in which she was present. She said Denny Phillips made it clear that he wanted to personally kill Barrientos.

"He wanted to shoot Casey, I know that," Sanders said. "He said he wanted to look in his eyes."

Sanders said she broke up with Denny Phillips in September 2009, two months before the shootings and did not report the threats because she did not take them seriously.

In May 2012, Tyner pleaded guilty to six counts of first-degree murder and was sentenced to consecutive life prison sentences without the possibility of parole in a plea agreement to avoid a possible death sentence.

HBO's "Cathouse" focused on the Moonlite Bunny Ranch near Carson City, Nev. Brooke Phillips left the show two months before her death after becoming pregnant.

http://www.businessweek.com/ap/2013-02-20/prosecutors-seek-death-penalty-in-cathouse-case
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on March 26, 2013, 02:03:59 PM
Oklahoma Attorney General Seeks Execution Date For Death Row Inmate


Posted: Mar 25, 2013 7:48 PM CDT Updated: Mar 25, 2013 7:48 PM CDT

By Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY - Oklahoma's attorney general is asking for an execution date for a man convicted of the stabbing deaths of a wealthy Le Flore County couple.

Attorney General Scott Pruitt asked the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals Monday to set an execution date for James Lewis DeRosa. The U.S. Supreme Court denied DeRosa's final appeal on Monday.

The 36-year-old DeRosa was convicted in 2001 of two counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of 73-year-old Curtis Plummer and 70-year-old Gloria Plummer of Poteau.

Prosecutors say DeRosa had worked at the Plummers' ranch. They alleged that DeRosa and 32-year-old John Eric Castleberry slashed the Plummers' throats and stole about $70.

Castleberry pleaded guilty to first-degree murder and testified against DeRosa in exchange for a life sentence without the possibility of parole.

www.news9.com

The very same day SCOTUS denies Derosa AG Pruitt is there requsting an X date!  8)
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on March 26, 2013, 02:45:43 PM
News Release

03/25/2013

Execution Date Requested for James L. DeRosa


OKLAHOMA CITY - Attorney General Scott Pruitt on Monday filed a request with the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals to set an execution date for LeFlore County death row inmate James Lewis DeRosa, 36.

The U.S. Supreme Court denied DeRosa's final appeal on Monday.

In October 2001, DeRosa was found guilty by a jury of his peers and subsequently convicted and sentenced to death for the first-degree murders of Curtis Plummer, 73, and Gloria Plummer, 70, both of Poteau.

DeRosa was briefly employed by the Plummers and told several friends on multiple occasions he thought the elderly couple would be an easy target to rob. DeRosa's friend Eric Castleberry, 21, agreed to help with the robbery and Castleberry's friend, Scotty White, 18, agreed to drive.

After being welcomed into the Plummers' home, DeRosa and Castleberry brandished knives. While the couple begged and struggled for their lives, DeRosa proceeded to stab the Plummers multiple times and slit their throats. DeRosa and Castleberry left the scene with $73 and the couple's pickup truck. The truck was ditched in a nearby lake.

Castleberry testified at DeRosa's trial in exchange for a sentence of life without the possibility of parole. White was charged with accessory after the fact to murder and received two 25-year sentences with the last seven years on probation.

In Monday's filing, General Pruitt asked the court to set the date "sixty days after March 25, 2013."

Derosa - Application for Exec Date.pdf

|313 NE 21st Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73105 | OKC 405.521.3921| Tulsa 918.581.2885 |

www.oag.state.ok.us
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on March 26, 2013, 04:46:31 PM
Okla. House approves changes to death penalty
Posted March 26, 2013 at 11:06 a.m.

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) -- The Oklahoma House has overwhelmingly approved a bill to make the death penalty an option in first-degree murder cases only if the state is seeking it. Current law tells judges to consider the penalty even if the state doesn't ask for it.

The chamber voted 82-10 Tuesday in support of the proposal from Rep. Scott Biggs of Chickasha. It has already passed the Senate and now waits for Gov. Mary Fallin's signature to become law.

Courts currently have hearings after convictions of first-degree murder to consider life in prison, life without parole or death as punishments. Biggs' bill would specify that if the state isn't seeking death but can still show the suspect has a history of felonies, life and life without parole -- not death -- will be considered.

http://www.timesrecordnews.com/news/2013/mar/26/okla-house-approves-changes-death-penalty/
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on April 02, 2013, 08:01:09 PM
April 1, 2013
US court upholds death penalty for Oklahoma man

OKLAHOMA CITY -- A federal appeals court on Monday upheld the first-degree murder conviction and death sentence of a Ponca City man for the June 1999 death of a 19-year-old woman.

The Denver-based 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rejected Clayton Darrell Lockett's claim that victim impact testimony that included sentencing recommendations violated Lockett's constitutional rights.

Lockett's attorney, Assistant Federal Defender Dean Sanderford of Denver, did not immediately return a phone call seeking comment.

A jury in Noble County convicted Lockett, 38, in the shooting death of Stephanie Nieman of Perry. Along with first-degree murder, Lockett was also convicted on 18 other counts, including first-degree rape, kidnapping and robbery. Jurors recommended a death sentence.

Investigators said Nieman and another 19-year-old woman had their hands bound with duct tape after Lockett and two other men forced their way into a home in Perry. The two women along with a man and his 9-month-old son were taken to Kay County, where Neiman was shot. Police said the others were driven back to Perry and released. Neiman's body was found in a shallow grave along a dirt road near Tonkawa.

Among other things, Lockett argued that victim impact testimony during the sentencing phase of his trial violated his constitutional rights. The appeals court said "some portions of the victim impact statement were unconstitutional" but did not have a substantial effect on the jury's sentencing decision.

The court said statements by the victim's family members included "an unambiguous plea to the jury to sentence Mr. Lockett to death."

The appeals court said it has ruled in previous cases that overwhelming evidence of guilt and testimony about the brutality of the crime "clearly outweighed any potential impact of unconstitutional victim impact testimony."

"We cannot conclude that the erroneously admitted victim impact testimony in this case was prejudicial," the court said.

http://enidnews.com/featuredstory/x2055654681/US-court-upholds-death-penalty-for-Oklahoma-man
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on April 16, 2013, 06:03:52 PM
 Execution date sought for Ponca City killer
Attorney General Scott Pruitt asked for an execution date for Oklahoma death row inmate Brian Darrell Davis after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected his final appeal.
Published: April 15, 2013   

WASHINGTON -- Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt on Monday asked the state Court of Criminal Appeals to set an execution date for Brian Darrell Davis after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected the death row inmate's appeal.



Davis, 38, was convicted of raping and killing his girlfriend's mother, Jody Sanford, in November 2001 in Ponca City. He was given the death sentence for the killing and 100 years in prison for the rape. Davis has lost all of his appeals at the state and federal levels.

The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld his convictions and sentences last summer, rejecting Davis' arguments that his attorney was ineffective and he was coerced into confessing to the killing by a police detective who called him a cold-blooded killer.

The U.S. Supreme Court, without comment on Monday, upheld the appeals court rulings.

Pruitt asked for an execution date 60 days from Monday or at the earliest possible date.

http://newsok.com/execution-date-sought-for-ponca-city-killer/article/3786382
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on April 24, 2013, 05:36:36 PM
April 23, 2013
Okla. AG requests execution date for death row inmate

By Rachel Petersen Staff Writer

McALESTER -- Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt requested that the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals set an execution date for Oklahoma State Penitentiary death row inmate Brian Darrell Davis.

On April 15, the U.S. Supreme Court denied Davis's final appeal. Pruitt asked the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals to set an execution date 60 days after April 15, "or the earliest date the court deems fit."

The 38-year-old death row inmate was convicted of the Nov. 4, 2001, rape and murder of 52-year-old Josephine "Jody" Sanford.

"In January 2003, Davis was found guilty by a jury for the November 2001 first-degree murder and rape of his girlfriend's mother, Jody Sanford, 52, of Ponca City," Pruitt said in a press release. "He was sentenced to death for the murder and 100 years for rape."

According to court records, Davis returned home in the early morning hours of Nov. 4, 2001, after socializing with friends at a local club. When he arrived home, he found that his girlfriend, Stacey Sanford, and their 3-year-old daughter were missing.

Davis called Jody Sanford, Stacey Sanford's mother, to ask if she knew were his girlfriend and daughter were, court records state. "When Jody could not locate her daughter and granddaughter, she went to Stacey's and Davis's apartment."

Davis made several conflicting statements regarding what happened while Jody Sanford was in his home. According to court records, he changed his story multiple times and told different stories to his girlfriend, to police and to the jury at his trial. Court records indicate that Davis did admit to having sex with and stabbing Jody Sanford.

When Stacey Sanford arrived home shortly after 9 a.m., she found her mother's body. "Stacey (Sanford) immediately called 911 and local police arrived to investigate," court records state. "Meanwhile, Davis had been involved in a single-car accident while driving Jody's van near the Salt Fork River Bridge. Davis was seriously injured after he was ejected from the van through the front windshield. Davis was transported to a local hospital for treatment."

Because Davis had a blood alcohol level of .09 percent, he was placed under arrest for driving under the influence and was later transferred to a regional hospital in Wichita, Kan., for treatment for injuries he sustained in the car accident.

According to Pruitt, Jody Sanford had been beaten and stabbed six times and DNA evidence showed Davis had raped her.

Davis has been in custody with the Oklahoma Department of Corrections since March 17, 2003.

http://mcalesternews.com/local/x1097431251/Okla-AG-requests-execution-date-for-death-row-inmate
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on May 21, 2013, 05:22:42 AM
Oklahoma Attorney General Seeks Execution Date For Convicted Killer
Posted: May 21, 2013 3:59 AM Updated: May 21, 2013 3:59 AM
Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY -

Attorney General Scott Pruitt is asking for an execution date for a man convicted in the 1979 slaying of a woman in Tulsa.

Pruitt on Monday said in an appeals court filing that Anthony Rozelle Banks had exhausted his appeals. The U.S. Supreme Court earlier in the day turned away a request by Banks for a hearing.

The 60-year-old Banks wasn't charged until 1997 when he and a co-defendant were linked by DNA evidence to the killing of 24-year-old Sun "Kim" Travis.

Travis was kidnapped from a parking lot in Tulsa, raped and shot in the head.

Pruitt asked the Court of Criminal Appeals to set an execution date within 60 days or at the earliest date it deems fit.

http://www.newson6.com/story/22303959/oklahoma-attorney-general-seeks-execution-date-for-convicted-killer
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on May 21, 2013, 05:03:26 PM
Ya gotta love Scott Pruett...the very same day the Supremes deny an OK scumbag he's there asking for an X date!  8)
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on July 26, 2013, 10:22:49 AM
Denver appeals court rules against Oklahoma death row inmate
The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rules against Richard Glossip's claim of unfair trial after the 1997 murder of Barry Alan Van Treese, owner of the Best Budget Inn, 301 S Council Road.
Published: July 26, 2013

DENVER -- An appeals court Thursday refused to overturn the death sentence of a former Oklahoma City motel manager convicted of murder for directing the killing of the motel owner.

The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled 3-0 against Richard Glossip's claim that he did not receive a fair trial for the 1997 murder of Barry Alan Van Treese at the Best Budget Inn, 301 S Council Road.

Judges of the Denver-based court, in a 71-page decision, stated that Glossip "received a fundamentally fair trial."

The motel's maintenance man, Justin Sneed, confessed to killing Van Treese, but said he did so at the direction of Glossip, who thought the motel owner was going to fire him.

The prosecutor, Fern Smith, said at the trial in Oklahoma County District Court that Glossip was more culpable than Sneed because Glossip "was the mastermind." Smith said Glossip persuaded Sneed that he could rob Van Treese of as much as $36,000, which he supposedly would have on him.

Sneed agreed to plead guilty to first-degree murder and testify against Glossip in exchange for a sentence of life without parole.

Glossip claimed he didn't get a fair trial for at least five reasons, including alleged misconduct by the prosecutor, ineffective assistance by his attorney and improper victim-impact evidence.

http://newsok.com/denver-appeals-court-rules-against-oklahoma-death-row-inmate/article/3866063
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on August 09, 2013, 11:11:26 AM
Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals affirms murder convictions, death penalty in deaths of 5
August 07, 2013 - 7:28 pm EDT

OKLAHOMA CITY -- An Oklahoma appeals court Wednesday upheld the death penalty imposed on an Oklahoma man convicted in the deaths of his wife and her four children 20 years ago.

The Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals affirmed the murder convictions and sentences given to Roderick Lynn Smith, 46, who was convicted of five counts of first-degree murder for the June 1993 deaths of his wife, Jennifer, and her four children. Smith admitted that he killed the victims.

In a 47-page decision, the five-member court unanimously rejected defense arguments that the Oklahoma County jury that sentenced Smith to death received inadequate legal instructions about his alleged mental retardation. The court ruled that a separate jury in Oklahoma County decided in March 2004 that Smith was not mentally retarded as defined by Oklahoma law.

The U.S. Supreme Court banned the execution of the mentally retarded in 2002, ruling that executing mentally retarded individuals violates the Eighth Amendment's ban on cruel and unusual punishments. Among other criteria, Oklahoma law defines mental retardation as a person with an IQ of 70 or below who has "significant limitations in adaptive functioning."

Smith's attorney, Marva Banks of the Oklahoma County Public Defender's Office, argued that the sentencing jury heard evidence about Smith's mental deficiencies, but the trial judge deleted directions about the relevance of the information from the legal instruction he gave jurors.

In spite of the 2004 judgment that Smith was not mentally retarded, Banks argued it was still appropriate to present evidence of Smith's alleged mental retardation at his sentencing trial. Banks did not immediately return a telephone call seeking comment on the appeals court's ruling.

The victims' bodies were found on June 28, 1993. Investigators said Jennifer Smith, 9-year-old Glen Carter Jr. and 7-year-old Ladarian Carter were stabbed to death. Shemeka Carter, 10, and Kanesha Carter, 6, were strangled, officials said.

Smith was originally sent to Oklahoma's death row in November 1994 when a jury returned five death sentences, punishment that was overturned in 2004 by the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Another jury was convened in 2010 to determine punishment and imposed two death sentences for the deaths of Smith's two stepdaughters and sentences of life without parole for the deaths of his wife and his two stepsons.

The appeal is the second time the state appellate court has considered evidence of Smith's alleged mental retardation. In August 2003, the court remanded the case back to Oklahoma County District Court for a jury trial to determine if Smith was mentally retarded.

No execution date has been set for Smith. He is being held at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester.


http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/b40063ba375343e7914a877194c43515/OK--Oklahoma-Killings-Appeal
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on August 26, 2013, 06:55:59 PM
Court reverses Tulsa County murder conviction of death row inmate
By Associated Press on Aug 26, 2013,

OKLAHOMA CITY -- A federal appeals court has reversed the first-degree murder conviction of an Oklahoma death row inmate convicted in the stabbing death of a 22-year-old woman 16 years ago.

The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ordered a new trial Monday for 45-year-old Sterling B. Williams. A three-judge panel of the Denver-based court ruled that jurors at his 1999 trial in Tulsa County should have been instructed to consider convicting Williams of the lesser crime of second-degree murder, which is not punishable by death.

Williams, a door-to-door meat salesman, was found guilty in the murder of 22-year-old LeAnna Beth Hand, who died on May 14, 1997, after being stabbed with a butcher knife.

Williams was paroled from an Arkansas prison in 1996 after serving time for rape, kidnapping and other convictions.

http://www.tulsaworld.com/article.aspx/Court_reverses_Tulsa_County_murder_conviction_of_inmate/20130826_14_0_OKLAHO116762?subj=298
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: deeg on August 26, 2013, 07:55:11 PM
Based on the timeline, this loser was paroled and within a year murdered a young woman.  So much for the "they have changed" excuse for this POS.   Hopefully, Williams will be convicted, yet again for 1st Degree murder and sentenced to LI.
Even better, Oklahoma appeals to SCOTUS which overturns the 10th Circuit.

Dee
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on October 07, 2013, 06:53:47 PM
SCOTUS denied Ricky Ray Malone's cert today.  I am betting that Oklahoma AG Scott Pruitt is already knocking on the state supreme court's door asking for a date!  ;D
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on October 07, 2013, 08:05:09 PM
And you can put Ronald Lott, Johnny Black and Michael Wilson in the same boat.  AG Pruitt doesn't let the grass grow under his feet.  I just hope OK has enough drugs to do them in!

Wilson was an accomplice in the beating death of a Tulsa convenience store clerk...Darwin Brown and Billy Alverson have already been snuffed for the crime.
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on October 08, 2013, 02:23:38 PM
Execution dates sought for Oklahoma's death row inmates


The U.S. Supreme Court rejected final appeals and Attorney General Scott Pruitt seeks execution dates for convicted killers from Oklahoma City, Tulsa and Stephens County within 24 hours.  ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D


By Chris Casteel   Published: October 8, 2013 

WASHINGTON -- Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt sought execution dates Monday for three death row inmates whose final appeals have been rejected by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Ronald C. Lott, 53; Johnny Dale Black, 48; and Michael L. Wilson, 38, might be executed by the end of the year. Pruitt asked the Court of Criminal Appeals to set dates, though none of the executions could be held for at least 60 days.

Four men have been executed this year in the state.

On the first day of its new term, the Supreme Court on Monday, without comment, rejected appeals from Wilson, Black and Lott.

Lott was convicted in 2001 of two counts of first-degree murder for the 1986 and 1987 choking deaths of Anna Laura Fowler, 83, and Zelma Cutler, 90. The women lived across the street from each other in Oklahoma City and were raped and killed four months apart.

Another man, Robert Lee Miller Jr., was convicted in 1987 of killing the two women; he served 11 years in jail and seven years on death row before being released in 1998 after DNA testing excluded him and implicated Lott.

Black was convicted in 1999 in Stephens County of killing Ringling horse trainer Bill Pogue, who was 54. Pogue suffered 10 stab wounds, broken ribs and two punctured lungs.

Wilson was one of four men convicted in the killing of Tulsa convenience store clerk Richard Yost during a 1995 robbery. Yost was beaten to death with a baseball bat in a back room while Wilson, a co-worker, waited on customers.

Wilson would be the third man executed for the crime. The fourth was given a life sentence.

www.NewsOK.com

Scott Pruitt is my hero!  8)
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on November 18, 2013, 04:33:30 PM
Oklahoma City woman's killer loses final appeal

The U.S. Supreme Court declined to review the conviction of death row inmate Kenneth Eugene Hogan, who killed Lisa Stanley in 1988

By Chris Casteel

WASHINGTON - The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected the final appeal of death row inmate Kenneth Eugene Hogan, who was convicted of killing a friend in 1988 in Oklahoma City.

Without comment, the court declined to review the conviction of Hogan, 52, who stabbed Lisa Stanley to death during an argument.

Hogan's first conviction for the murder was overturned in 1999, when a federal appeals court ruled that the jury should have been able to consider first-degree manslaughter as a verdict. His retrial in 2003 also resulted in a death sentence.

www.newsok.com

If you are looking for OK AG Scott Pruitt he is over at the OK Supreme Court asking for a date.  8)
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on December 27, 2013, 06:28:22 PM
Death-row inmate claiming jury tampering is granted a hearing
Posted: Friday, December 27, 2013 12:00 am | Updated: 7:51 am, Fri Dec 27, 2013.



OKLAHOMA CITY —- An appeals court ruled Thursday that a death-row inmate deserves a hearing to examine allegations of jury tampering at his second trial.

Bigler J. "Bud" Stouffer II was convicted twice of first-degree murder and shooting with an intent to kill in a 1985 attack against his girlfriend's estranged husband, Doug Ivens, and Ivens' girlfriend, Putnam City teacher Linda Reaves. Ivens survived; Reaves was killed.

Each time he was convicted, Stouffer received the death penalty for Reaves' slaying and life in prison for the attack on Ivens.

An appellate court ruled in 1999 that Stouffer had received inadequate legal representation at his first trial and granted him a new one. He was convicted and received the same sentences again in 2003.

In an appeal, Stouffer alleges that during his second trial, he provided evidence to the court of improper external communication involving a juror and her husband and that the court improperly refused to allow an evidentiary hearing to determine whether it had affected the trial's outcome.

A 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel agreed and, on Thursday, ordered a new hearing to examine the allegations.

The court said that toward the end of the penalty stage of Stouffer's second trial, his attorney noticed the juror's husband in the courtroom, "laughing, joking, handshaking and embracing" with a former roommate of Ivens' who was sitting with Ivens' family.

A deputy responsible for escorting Stouffer during the trial later testified that he saw repeated nonverbal communication between the juror and her husband. The deputy said he saw the husband nod and wink at the juror during closing arguments and testimony during the penalty stage.

But the trial court concluded that the deputy's testimony and Stouffer's trial lawyer's observations were not credible evidence of improper juror communication. Instead, they constituted only "speculation," the appeals court wrote.

The court wrote that a hearing is required "to uncover the facts and circumstances of the contact ."

A representative of Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt's office did not respond to a phone message seeking comment.

http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/courts/death-row-inmate-claiming-jury-tampering-is-granted-a-hearing/article_e6823150-6efd-11e3-9ea5-0019bb30f31a.html
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on January 09, 2014, 04:01:12 PM
Oklahoma man charged with 'atomic wedgie' murder of stepfather


By Heide Brandes

OKLAHOMA CITY  Wed Jan 8, 2014 5:46pm EST
 
(Reuters) - A 33-year-old Oklahoma man has been charged with killing his stepfather by giving him an "atomic wedgie," that caused the victim to suffocate on his own underwear.  :o

Brad Lee Davis was charged with murder in the death of 58-year-old Denver St. Clair in a drunken family fight at a residence just east of Oklahoma City, the Pottawatomie County Sheriff's Office said in an arrest affidavit obtained on Wednesday.

Police arrested Davis on Tuesday. The affidavit said he "grabbed St. Clair's underwear and gave him an 'atomic wedgie.' Davis allegedly pulled the elastic waistband of St. Clair's underwear over his head and around his neck."

Oklahoma Medical Examiner spokeswoman Amy Elliott said the cause of death was asphyxiation and blunt force trauma.

Pottawatomie County Sheriff Deputy Travis Palmer said Davis and St. Clair were drinking beer on the night of December 21 at the older man's residence when St. Clair began speaking ill about his wife, who is Davis' mother.

Investigators said St. Clair's elastic waistband was stretched over his head and that it left ligature marks around his neck. Blood splatter was also found in the kitchen, the living room and on the living room ceiling.

Davis was being held in Pottawatomie County without bond. His lawyer was not immediately available for comment.

www.reuters.com
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Naviator on January 10, 2014, 03:42:25 AM
Sounds like a life imprisonmemt case at most.  Two drunks in a fight, no pre-meditation, and intent to kill with an atomic wedgie will be impossible to prove (I have never heard of a death by similar means in the past, and everyone knows about atomic wedgies)..
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on January 13, 2014, 04:34:39 PM
U.S. Supreme Court Rejects Final Appeals of Two on Oklahoma's Death Row


By Chris Casteel  Published: January 13, 2014 

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected the final appeals of two men on Oklahoma's death row, including one who raped and killed an Oklahoma County infant in 1997.

Without comment, the court rejected the appeals of Charles Frederick Warren and Clayton Darrell Lockett.

Warren was given the death penalty after a trial in 2003 for killing Adriana Waller, the 11-month-old child of Warner's girlfriend. He was given a separate sentence of 75 years for raping the child.

Lockett was sentenced to death for his role in the 1999 killing of Stephanie Michelle Neiman in Perry.

www.newsok.com

Well boys you can bet your sorry asses that OK AG Scott Pruitt will seek an X date for both of you today!  8)
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on January 14, 2014, 02:52:04 PM
Told ya...

Execution dates sought for two convicted of murder in Oklahoma


Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt asked for execution dates after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected the final appeal of two death row inmates

By Chris Casteel  Published: January 14, 2014 

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected the final appeals of two Oklahoma death row inmates convicted of murders and rapes.

Without comment, the court declined to hear appeals from Charles Frederick Warner and Clayton Derrell Lockett. Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt asked the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals to set execution dates for the men.

Warner, 46, was convicted in Oklahoma County of raping and killing 11-month Adriana Waller in 1997. The infant was the child of his girlfriend. Warner was given the death penalty for the killing and 75 years for the rape.  >:(

Lockett, 38, was one of three men who forced their way into a Perry home in 1999; some of the victims at the home were beaten, four were kidnapped. Stephanie Michelle Neiman, who was 19, was raped and killed and buried in a shallow grave in rural Kay County.

Lockett was found guilty of first-degree murder, conspiracy, first-degree burglary, three counts of assault with a dangerous weapon, three counts of forcible oral sodomy, four counts of first-degree rape, four counts of kidnapping and two counts of robbery by force and fear.

Both men could be executed within the next few weeks.

The state executed Michael Lee Wilson last week and is scheduled to execute Kenneth Eugene Hogan on Jan. 23. Two others, Johnny Dale Black and Ronald Clinton Lott, were executed last month.  8)

www.NewsOK.com
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on February 15, 2014, 12:03:40 AM
Okla. court rejects hearing for death row inmate
Posted February 14, 2014 at 7:02 a.m.

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) -- An Oklahoma appeals court has rejected a death row inmate's request for an evidentiary hearing.

The Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals handed down the ruling Thursday for 47-year-old Roderick L. Smith.

Smith was convicted in Oklahoma County of five counts of first-degree murder for the June 1993 deaths of his wife, Jennifer, and her four children.

Smith acknowledged killing the victims. He was sentenced to death on two of the murder counts and to life in prison without parole on the remaining three.

The appeals court rejected allegations by Smith that his attorney was ineffective at his murder trial. The court affirmed Smith's murder convictions and sentences in a separate decision in August.

Smith's appellate attorney, Wayna Tyner, did not immediately return a telephone call seeking comment.

http://www.timesrecordnews.com/news/2014/feb/14/okla-court-rejects-hearing-death-row-inmate/
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on March 19, 2014, 07:04:20 PM
Oklahoma Injected Lethal Drugs Into Its Death Row Convicts - After They Were Executed

;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

The Atlantic 1 hr ago | By Dustin Volz

The state of Oklahoma injected executed convicts with lethal drugs for "disposal purposes," newly published state records show.

The macabre practice, first reported Tuesday by The Colorado Independent, could tamper with postmortem toxicology results in a way that obscures from public knowledge the amount of pain endured during execution, a revelation that calls into question the state's methods for administering capital punishment at a time when lethal-injection protocols nationwide are drawing renewed scrutiny.

"Convicts executed in Oklahoma have in some cases died from overdoses of pentobarbital or sodium thiopental (which is how Texas kills them all dumbass) the anesthetic, rather than the second and third injections in the three-drug cocktail, according to documents obtained by The Independent," reporter Katie Fretland writes. "Records show executioners then injected the remaining two drugs into convicts' dead bodies for what forms turned over in response to an open-records request refer to as 'disposal purposes.' "

State prison officials defended the practice, telling The Independent that it follows appropriate protocol.

Some completely unbiased reporting from www.msn.com
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on March 26, 2014, 06:36:22 PM
Oklahoma Judge Tosses State Execution Law


OKLAHOMA CITY March 26, 2014 (AP)

By BAILEY ELISE McBRIDE Associated Press

An Oklahoma judge ruled the state's execution law unconstitutional Wednesday because its privacy provision is so strict that it that prevents inmates from finding out the source of drugs used in executions, even through the courts.

After condemned inmates gasped or complained they were "burning" during executions in January, inmates Clayton Lockett and Charles Warner asked Oklahoma prison officials who was making the drugs that would kill them and whether the material was pure.

However, under state law, no one is allowed to disclose the source of drugs used in a lethal injection -- even if an inmate sues and seeks the information as part of the discovery process. Oklahoma County District Judge Patricia Parrish said that prevents the inmates from exercising rights under the Constitution.

"I think that the secrecy statute is a violation of due process because access to the courts has been denied," Parrish ruled.

The supply of drugs used in lethal injections has dried up in recent years as European manufacturers object to their use in executions and U.S. companies fear protests or boycotts.

Some death-penalty states have sought to buy or trade drugs with other states, and some have turned to compounding pharmacies that face less scrutiny from federal regulators. Many, like Oklahoma, made the process secret, too, to protect their suppliers.

Lockett and Warner's challenge focused on what they called a "veil of secrecy." They said they feared that if the drugs used to kill them weren't pure, they could be conscious during their executions but unable to communicate. Knowing the source of the drugs could help them ensure the drugs were suitable, they said.

Assistant Attorney General Seth Branham warned the judge that she would be "treading into some deep water" if she ruled for the inmates. He said the inmates hadn't proven they were at risk and that there was nothing they could do to stop their execution from being carried out anyway.

"This is all just speculation piled upon hyperbole," Branham said. "What is the point of having the information if there's nothing you can do with it?"


It wasn't immediately clear when the inmates would receive the information. The state plans to appeal.

"I imagine the underlying decision will be stayed until the Oklahoma Supreme Court can weigh in on it," said Seth Day, a lawyer for the men.

The inmates, who are to be executed next month, have stay requests pending before the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals. They have not challenged their convictions or death sentences. Lockett was found guilty in the 1999 shooting death of a 19-year-old Perry woman. Warner was found guilty of the 1997 rape and murder of his girlfriend's 11-month-old daughter.

Lockett is scheduled to die April 22. Warner's execution is April 29.

Oklahoma last week changed its protocols to allow five distinct methods of execution.

Three procedures use a three-drug protocol that starts with either sodium thiopental, pentobarbital or midazolam and ends with vecuronium bromide, which paralyzes inmates, and potassium chloride, which stops the heart.  One uses a megadose of pentobarbital, and the other uses midazolam with hydromorphone.

Inmate Michael Wilson died at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in January after a three-drug injection that started with pentobarbital. His final words were "I feel my whole body burning."

Branham suggested in court Wednesday that Wilson's lawyer may have coaxed him to complain in an effort to interfere with future executions.

www.abcnews.com

Just another judge with an ANTI agenda trying to make a name for herself...higher courts will bitch-slap her into submission.  :D
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on May 05, 2014, 06:44:05 PM
Another Oklahoma death row inmate loses final appeal
Published: May 5, 2014

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected the final appeal of an Oklahoma death row inmate who was convicted of killing an Oklahoma City motel owner in 1997.

Without comment, the court declined to review the case of Richard Glossip, who received the death penalty for killing Barry Alan Van Treese at the Best Budget Inn.

The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled last year that Glossip had received "a fundamentally fair trial."

Typically after a death row inmate exhausts his appeals, the state attorney general requests an execution date.

However, Oklahoma's execution protocols are currently being reviewed because of problems last week in the execution of Clayton Lockett.

http://newsok.com/another-oklahoma-death-row-inmate-loses-final-appeal/article/4746337
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on August 12, 2014, 06:14:42 AM
OK Man Convicted Of Killing Wife, Unborn Child Formally Sentenced To Death
Posted: Aug 11, 2014

OKLAHOMA CITY -

An Oklahoma man convicted of killing his estranged wife and her unborn baby has formally been sentenced to death.

In June, 2014, Fabion Brown was found guilty on two counts of first degree murder and one count of conspiracy for the 2012 murders of his wife, Jessica Brown, and her unborn child.

An Oklahoma County jury sentenced Brown to death. The jury decided on the death penalty due to two aggravating circumstances: Brown knowingly created a great risk of death to more than one person and Brown hired someone to commit the murders for money.

Brown defended himself throughout the trial, but he changed his mind and asked to have an attorney represent him in the punishment phase. The court decided it was too late in the process to make a change.

On Monday, August 11, Oklahoma County District Judge Ray Elliot formally sentenced Brown to death on two counts of first-degree murder. Judge Elliot also sentenced him to 10 years and ordered him to pay a $5,000 fine on the charge of conspiracy to commit murder.

Judge Elliott told Brown that he will be put to death on October 31, 2014.

http://www.newson6.com/story/26249231/ok-man-convicted-of-killing-wife-unborn-child-formally-sentenced-to-death
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on September 09, 2014, 06:22:03 PM
Oklahoma prisons director: Agency to get new equipment for executions, tool to find vein


Published September 08, 2014 Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY -  Oklahoma is renovating its death chamber and buying new equipment for executions, including a tool to allow staff to more easily find suitable veins for lethal injections after a troubled execution in April, the director of the state Department of Corrections said Monday.

Director Robert Patton said state prison officials began reviewing Oklahoma's execution guidelines immediately after the April 29 execution of Clayton Lockett.  He said the agency intends to have new guidelines and equipment in place in time for the state's next scheduled execution on Nov. 13.

"We are working very hard to get the protocol done," Patton said. "It is the intention of the agency to be ready by the November execution."

A report released by the state Department of Public Safety last week blamed Lockett's flawed lethal injection on poor placement of intravenous lines and said the medical team could not find suitable veins in Lockett's arms, legs, neck and feet before the line was inserted into his groin. Patton said the Corrections Department will be getting a vein finder to help with that issue.

The report included 11 recommendations for improving the execution process, including more training for medical personnel, better communication between authorities who are part of the process and acquiring additional supplies of lethal drugs and equipment.

"It is our intention to adopt all of the recommendations from the report that are within our authority," Patton said. A recommendation that Oklahoma hold executions at least seven days apart cannot be adopted by the agency because it's up to the courts to set execution dates, he said.

Republican Gov. Mary Fallin has said she wants the new guidelines implemented before the state conducts another execution. Patton said he will inform Fallin if new procedures aren't in place or training isn't done before the next scheduled execution, on Nov. 13.

That's when Charles Frederick Warner is scheduled to die for the 1997 rape and murder of 11-month-old Adrianna Walker, the daughter of his roommate. Warner was set to die on the same day as Lockett, but his execution was postponed after problems developed during Lockett's lethal injection.

Lockett was convicted of shooting Stephanie Nieman, 19, with a sawed-off shotgun and watching as two accomplices buried her alive in 1999.

Patton said upgrades to the death chamber will include new communication devices so government officials can know what's going on. He said the improvements will create more room inside the death chamber and allow the prison director and other staff members to be inside during the execution. Previously, the prison director was in a witness viewing area.

"I was standing outside talking to the governor's legal staff," Patton said. "Moving forward I will be inside and in direct communication, eyes on what's going on."

Patton said he does not yet know the cost of the renovations.

Patton declined comment on whether the sedative midazolam, which was used for the first time in the state with Lockett, will continue to be part of Oklahoma's lethal injection method, which is being challenged in a federal lawsuit filed by Warner and other death row inmates.

Patton said he hopes to get the new guidelines to the state attorney general's office for approval in the next couple of weeks. They will then be posted on the prison system's website, Patton said.

"At that time we will begin training staff on the new policy and new protocol," he said.

www.foxnews.com
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on September 23, 2014, 02:29:14 PM
Oklahoma lawmaker proposes nitrogen gas for executions


By Heide Brandes

(Reuters) - An Oklahoma lawmaker has proposed nitrogen gas as a possible alternative for executing condemned prisoners after an execution in April raised concerns about lethal injection.

State Representative Mike Christian, a Republican, on Tuesday called for a state House committee to study the use of "nitrogen hypoxia" for executions, saying it would be painless for inmates and affordable for Oklahoma.

The process, which would require an inmate to be in a sealed chamber or wear a special mask, would slowly replace oxygen with nitrogen.

"We are a conservative state, and as long as our constituents support capital punishment, we must find a way to carry out executions painlessly and humanely," Christian told Reuters.

Christian said he began researching alternatives to lethal injection after the April execution of Clayton Lockett, in which drugs leaked into his tissue after an IV insertion failed.

Christian initially proposed a firing squad as an alternate method of execution, but said nitrogen asphyxiation would be painless and easier to carry out.

He said a 2008 BBC Horizon documentary about execution helped solidify his opinion about nitrogen gas. In the documentary, former British member of parliament Michael Portillo says that nitrogen could cause death in about 15 seconds, and the prisoner would not feel pain, but a euphoria similar to drunkenness.

Because no IVs or special drug cocktails would be used, Christian said the method is close to foolproof.

Oklahoma's chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union opposes the method.  ;D

"Oklahomans tend to question their government over everything except for executions," said Ryan Kiesel, executive director of the ACLU of Oklahoma. "Inherently, all executions are flawed. There will always be mistakes."

Following the study, Christian said he plans to file a bill introducing the use of nitrogen gas as an execution method in next year's legislative session.

www.reuters.com

A lot of good folks around here have been pushing this for years.  8)
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: phlebbb on September 23, 2014, 07:19:15 PM

Oklahoma lawmaker proposes nitrogen gas for executions


By Heide Brandes

(Reuters) - An Oklahoma lawmaker has proposed nitrogen gas as a possible alternative for executing condemned prisoners after an execution in April raised concerns about lethal injection.

State Representative Mike Christian, a Republican, on Tuesday called for a state House committee to study the use of "nitrogen hypoxia" for executions, saying it would be painless for inmates and affordable for Oklahoma.

The process, which would require an inmate to be in a sealed chamber or wear a special mask, would slowly replace oxygen with nitrogen.

"We are a conservative state, and as long as our constituents support capital punishment, we must find a way to carry out executions painlessly and humanely," Christian told Reuters.

Christian said he began researching alternatives to lethal injection after the April execution of Clayton Lockett, in which drugs leaked into his tissue after an IV insertion failed.

Christian initially proposed a firing squad as an alternate method of execution, but said nitrogen asphyxiation would be painless and easier to carry out.

He said a 2008 BBC Horizon documentary about execution helped solidify his opinion about nitrogen gas. In the documentary, former British member of parliament Michael Portillo says that nitrogen could cause death in about 15 seconds, and the prisoner would not feel pain, but a euphoria similar to drunkenness.

Because no IVs or special drug cocktails would be used, Christian said the method is close to foolproof.

Oklahoma's chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union opposes the method.  ;D

"Oklahomans tend to question their government over everything except for executions," said Ryan Kiesel, executive director of the ACLU of Oklahoma. "Inherently, all executions are flawed. There will always be mistakes."

Following the study, Christian said he plans to file a bill introducing the use of nitrogen gas as an execution method in next year's legislative session.

www.reuters.com

A lot of good folks around here have been pushing this for years.  8)



Holy Sheep dip there  Fatman!!!!Maybe , just , maybe , my voice in the woods has been heard....lol ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on September 23, 2014, 09:35:39 PM
Ahhh Gunnery Sergeant Hartman...one of my heroes.  ;D
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on October 08, 2014, 05:57:47 PM
U.S. Supreme Court rejects final appeal of Oklahoma death row inmate


Oklahoma death row inmate Benjamin Cole, convicted in the 2002 killing of his infant daughter, is now expected to get an execution date.

by Chris Casteel   Published: October 8, 2014 

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Supreme Court has rejected the final appeal of Oklahoma death row inmate Benjamin Cole, who was convicted of killing his infant daughter in 2002.

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt will now request that the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals set an execution date for Cole, a spokesman for Pruitt said. 

(Knowing Pruett he waited about seven seconds after the appeal was denied to petition for an X date.  8) )

Cole, 49, confessed to breaking the back of his 9-month-old daughter in Rogers County because she wouldn't stop crying. All of his state appeals were rejected. His federal appeals, which claimed his attorneys were ineffective, ended Monday when the Supreme Court, without comment, declined to review his case.

Cole will join three other death row inmates with a scheduled execution date.

A review of the state's execution procedures has caused delays, though there are two now scheduled for next month. Charles F. Warner's execution is set for Nov. 13, Richard Eugene Glossip's for Nov. 20 and John Marion Grant's for Dec. 4.

www.NewsOK.com
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on December 23, 2014, 06:39:04 PM
Federal Judge Refuses To Keep Oklahoma Executions On Hold

Four inmates in Oklahoma are set to be executed in the first three months of 2015. The inmates' lawyer says they will continue to fight to stop the scheduled executions.

By Chris Geidner

A federal judge in Oklahoma on Monday refused to keep executions in the state on hold, turning down a request from four death-row inmates' scheduled to be executed in the first three months of 2015.

U.S. District Court Judge Stephen Friot denied the request for a preliminary injunction on Monday following a three-day hearing that took place last week.

"The court concludes that the movants have failed to establish a probability of success on the merits of any of the five claims they assert for preliminary injunction purposes," Friot wrote in the brief order, adding that "that entry of a preliminary injunction would not be in the public interest."

The lawsuit, filed by several Oklahoma death-row inmates, followed the botched execution of Clayton Lockett in April. Although Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin temporarily halted executions and reviewed the state's execution procedures, the state altered its execution protocol and has prepared to re-start executions.

Charles Warner is set to be executed on January 15, 2015, Richard Glossip on January 29, 2015, John Grant on February 19, 2015, and Benjamin Cole on March 5, 2015.

"There are several reasons for serious concern about Oklahoma's ability to carry out executions that comply with the Eighth Amendment's ban on cruel and unusual punishment," the inmates' lawyer, Dale Baich, said in a statement. "We will move forward and continue to fully challenge and expose the lack of safety and efficacy of the lethal injection procedures in Oklahoma."

Among the reasons to grant the injunction, the inmates had argued, were because they have a "real and immediate concern" they won't get "timely and meaningful notice as to how they will be executed" -- depriving them of the opportunity to seek relief from the courts.

The state countered that most federal courts agree that inmates have "no due process right to information regarding the methods of their executions."

The inmates also raised Eighth Amendment claims, arguing that the drugs and procedures used and training provided have the potential to lead to cruel and unusual punishment. "Defendants continue to experiment on captive subjects by using untested procedures that produce unknown results," the inmates' lawyers wrote.

"To the extent that there is a possibility that an individual would be currently licensed, pass the requisite background checks, participate in the training, and still make a mistake in the execution process," the state responded, "this is merely an outlier possibility, not a substantial risk of serious harm created by the protocol."

Finally, the inmates raised concerns about whether they will be "able to access information, access their counsel, and in turn access the courts on the day of their executions."

Of the "claim that they have a First Amendment right to information regarding their executions," the state argued, "This claim is baseless and unsupported by the law."

www.buzzfeed.com
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on December 23, 2014, 06:43:28 PM
Judge Dismisses Lawsuit on Oklahoma Execution Access

Media Outlets Sued in the Wake of Clayton Lockett's Execution

OKLAHOMA CITY -- A federal judge on Friday dismissed a lawsuit filed by media organizations seeking greater access to the execution of Oklahoma death row inmates, ruling that the state's death penalty protocols do not violate the First Amendment.

The lawsuit was filed in August by The Oklahoma Observer and the Guardian US news organizations, as well as two journalists who work for the organizations, after the April 29 execution of inmate Clayton Lockett. Lockett writhed, moaned and clenched his teeth before he was pronounced dead about 43 minutes after his execution began.

Prison officials lowered a shade 16 minutes after Lockett's execution started, blocking witnesses' view of the process. The lawsuit alleged the media should have greater access to witnessing an execution and opposed new protocols implemented since Lockett's execution that reduce the number of media witnesses and give the prisons' director the ability to limit what they see and hear.

In a 25-page order, U.S. District Judge Joe Heaton rejected assertions by the media organizations that their representatives have a constitutional right to view and hear the entire execution process from beginning to end. But Heaton gave the outlets 14 days to amend their lawsuit in an effort to buttress their legal claims.

"A conclusion that the protocol does not violate the Constitution does not necessarily mean it is good policy or that it is the best approach in the circumstances," Heaton wrote.

"Plaintiffs make a compelling argument that, given the nature of the interests involved and in light of Oklahoma's experience with the Lockett execution, a more open and expansive policy of access and disclosure may be desirable," the decision said.

The organizations' attorney, Brady Henderson, legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Oklahoma, said the media outlets have not decided whether to amend their lawsuit or appeal Heaton's decision.

The organizations disagree with the level of secrecy that shrouds Oklahoma's execution process for death row inmates, Henderson said.

"The court had an opportunity here to protect the right of the press, but ultimately the rights of the citizens of Oklahoma," he said. "The level of secrecy the state is bringing to this process is unprecedented, and it's disturbing."

The lawsuit alleged media representatives chosen to observe Lockett's execution were denied the opportunity to watch him entering the execution chamber and see his intravenous lines being prepared and inserted. The viewing shade was lifted as Lockett's execution began but prison officials lowered it again in the middle of the procedure.

The director of the state's prison system, Robert Patton, later called off the execution, but Lockett was declared dead about 10 minutes later. An autopsy determined he died of a heart attack as a result of the lethal drugs that were administered to him.

Separately on Friday, Patton told a federal judge that Oklahoma has the drugs it needs to execute four inmates early next year and plans to administer the same three drugs used in Lockett's execution, but with an increased dose.

Patton said the agency plans to use the exact formula used successfully in 11 executions in Florida, one that he believes is "humane."

www.buzzfeed.com

Love it!  The judge gives both the convicted murderers and the media the stiff middle finger!  :D
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: turboprinz on February 09, 2015, 09:58:20 PM
Oklahoma considers gas chamber to execute death row inmates
Feb 09, 2015

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) -- With executions in Oklahoma on hold amid a constitutional review of its lethal injection formula, Republican legislators are pushing to make Oklahoma the first state in the nation to allow nitrogen gas to execute death row inmates.

A bill scheduled for a hearing Wednesday in a House committee would make death by "nitrogen hypoxia" a backup method of execution if the state's current method were determined to be unconstitutional.

The U.S. Supreme Court is reviewing the state's three-drug method in a case sparked by a botched lethal injection last spring.

Rep. Mike Christian of Oklahoma City says using nitrogen gas to cut off an inmate's supply of oxygen would be a low-cost, foolproof method of execution.

An analysis of the bill projects a $300,000 cost to build a gas chamber.

http://townhall.com/news/politics-elections/2015/02/09/oklahoma-considers-gas-chamber-to-execute-death-row-inmates-n1955038
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: phlebbb on February 10, 2015, 12:31:28 AM

Oklahoma considers gas chamber to execute death row inmates
Feb 09, 2015

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) -- With executions in Oklahoma on hold amid a constitutional review of its lethal injection formula, Republican legislators are pushing to make Oklahoma the first state in the nation to allow nitrogen gas to execute death row inmates.

A bill scheduled for a hearing Wednesday in a House committee would make death by "nitrogen hypoxia" a backup method of execution if the state's current method were determined to be unconstitutional.

The U.S. Supreme Court is reviewing the state's three-drug method in a case sparked by a botched lethal injection last spring.

Rep. Mike Christian of Oklahoma City says using nitrogen gas to cut off an inmate's supply of oxygen would be a low-cost, foolproof method of execution.

An analysis of the bill projects a $300,000 cost to build a gas chamber.

http://townhall.com/news/politics-elections/2015/02/09/oklahoma-considers-gas-chamber-to-execute-death-row-inmates-n1955038
[/q



Great Idea!!!But... you do not need a "Gas Chamber",any O2 mask , such as a simple non-breather mask or some other form fitting mask would suffice. The gurney used in L.I. executions would do nicely, strap Mr./Mrs. scumbag to the gurney,let them have their say, put the mask on , and    lights out in 60 to 90 seconds. No needing to look for veins to start an I.V.,plus the added benefit of not having to worry that your source of nitrogen is going to be taken away because the death penalty is mean.A medical concentrator is a one time fee of between $5000.00 to $10000.00 dollars, and once purchased, would provide an unlimited source of Nitrogen gas, to send these wayward souls to their judgement.
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Naviator on February 10, 2015, 03:30:38 AM


Oklahoma considers gas chamber to execute death row inmates
Feb 09, 2015

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) -- With executions in Oklahoma on hold amid a constitutional review of its lethal injection formula, Republican legislators are pushing to make Oklahoma the first state in the nation to allow nitrogen gas to execute death row inmates.

A bill scheduled for a hearing Wednesday in a House committee would make death by "nitrogen hypoxia" a backup method of execution if the state's current method were determined to be unconstitutional.

The U.S. Supreme Court is reviewing the state's three-drug method in a case sparked by a botched lethal injection last spring.

Rep. Mike Christian of Oklahoma City says using nitrogen gas to cut off an inmate's supply of oxygen would be a low-cost, foolproof method of execution.

An analysis of the bill projects a $300,000 cost to build a gas chamber.

http://townhall.com/news/politics-elections/2015/02/09/oklahoma-considers-gas-chamber-to-execute-death-row-inmates-n1955038
[/q



Great Idea!!!But... you do not need a "Gas Chamber",any O2 mask , such as a simple non-breather mask or some other form fitting mask would suffice. The gurney used in L.I. executions would do nicely, strap Mr./Mrs. scumbag to the gurney,let them have their say, put the mask on , and    lights out in 60 to 90 seconds. No needing to look for veins to start an I.V.,plus the added benefit of not having to worry that your source of nitrogen is going to be taken away because the death penalty is mean.A medical concentrator is a one time fee of between $5000.00 to $10000.00 dollars, and once purchased, would provide an unlimited source of Nitrogen gas, to send these wayward souls to their judgement.


You should write them a letter suggesting this, save the taxpayers some money  ;)
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on February 11, 2015, 02:33:59 PM
Nitrogen gas death penalty bill clears Oklahoma panel


02/10/2015 11:52 AM KAALtv.com

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) -- Oklahoma would be the first state to use nitrogen gas to execute inmates under a bill that has unanimously cleared a Senate committee.

With no debate, the Senate Judiciary Committee voted 9-0 Tuesday to authorize "nitrogen hypoxia," which depletes oxygen supply in the blood to cause death.

The bill's author, Moore Republican Sen. Anthony Sykes, says it's likely the bill will be amended before the session is over.

Three lethal injections remain on hold in Oklahoma while the U.S. Supreme Court considers whether Oklahoma's three-drug method is constitutional.

A House committee studied the use of nitrogen gas to execute inmates after a lethal injection last spring sparked the legal challenge.

www.kaaltv.com
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Grinning Grim Reaper on June 29, 2015, 03:03:12 PM
Supreme Court upholds Oklahoma lethal injection process


WASHINGTON  |  By Lawrence Hurley

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday ruled that a drug used by Oklahoma as part of its lethal injection procedure does not violate the U.S. Constitution's ban on cruel and unusual punishment, dealing a setback to opponents of the death penalty.

The court, in a 5-4 decision with its conservative justices in the majority, handed a loss to three inmates who objected to the use of a sedative called midazolam, saying it cannot achieve the level of unconsciousness required for surgery, making it unsuitable for executions.

Justice Samuel Alito wrote on behalf of the court that the inmates had, among other things, failed to show that there was an alternative method of execution available that would be less painful.

In a dissenting opinion, liberal Justice Stephen Breyer said the court should consider whether the death penalty itself is constitutional. He was joined by one of his colleagues, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

The three-drug process used by Oklahoma prison officials has been under scrutiny since the April 2014 botched execution of convicted murderer Clayton Lockett. He could be seen twisting on the gurney after death chamber staff failed to place the intravenous line properly.

Inmates Richard Glossip, John Grant and Benjamin Cole challenged the procedure. Glossip arranged for his employer to be beaten to death. Grant stabbed a correctional worker to death. Cole killed his 9-month-old daughter.

The main question before the nine justices was whether the use of midazolam violates the Constitution's Eighth Amendment prohibition on cruel and unusual punishment.

"I believe it highly likely that the death penalty violates the Eighth Amendment," Breyer wrote.

Justice Antonin Scalia responded to Breyer in a separate concurring opinion. Scalia said Breyer's arguments were full of "internal contradictions" and were "gobbledy-gook."

The case did not address the constitutionality of the death penalty in general, but it brought fresh attention to the ongoing debate over whether the death penalty should continue in the United States at a time when most developed countries have abandoned it. During the oral argument in April, conservative Justice Samuel Alito said the challenge to the drug was part of a "guerrilla war" against the death penalty.

www.reuters.com

This puts Florida back in the game as well...prepare to get lit up boys!  8)
Title: Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News
Post by: Observer on June 29, 2015, 06:03:18 PM
I suppose the justice doesn't think that what happened to the victims was "cruel and unusual"?