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12 -  General Death Penalty / Executed Offenders (Graveyard) / Re: Willie Tyrone Trottie - TX - 9/10/14

Started by Grinning Grim Reaper - Last post by Amanda on: September 10, 2014, 04:54:29 PM

Executed!!!

http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/7582a4507b804a809033e2fa9def7146/US--Texas-Execution


Texas executes inmate for the 1993 killings of ex-wife and her brother in Houston

Wed. Sept. 10, 2014

HUNTSVILLE, Texas — A man convicted of gunning down his former common-law wife and her brother more than two decades ago in Houston was put to death by lethal injection Wednesday evening.

Willie Trottie's execution was carried out about 90 minutes after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected his last-day appeals. He had contended he had poor legal help at his trial and questioned the potency of the execution drug.

Trottie repeatedly expressed love to witnesses, both people he selected and relatives of his victims, and several times asked for forgiveness as he was about to be executed.

"I love you all," he said. "I'm going home, going to be with the Lord. ... Find it in your hearts to forgive me. I'm sorry."

As the lethal dose of the powerful sedative pentobarbital took effect, he closed his eyes and breathed quietly. After about eight breaths, he opened his mouth to exhale, then closed it. There was no further movement.

Trottie, 45, was pronounced dead at 6:35 p.m. CDT.

He had acknowledged shooting Barbara Canada, 24, and her brother, Titus Canada, 28, at their parents' home in Houston. But Trottie said the May 1993 shootings were accidental and in self-defense, and not worthy of a death sentence.

Prosecutors said he had threatened to kill Canada, who had a protective order against him, if she didn't return to him. They said he carried out that threat when barging into the house and opening fire.

His attorneys had argued to the Supreme Court that Trottie's lawyers at his 1993 trial were deficient for not addressing his self-defense theory and for failing to produce sufficient testimony about Trottie's abusive childhood with an alcoholic mother.

State attorneys scoffed at the argument, saying Trottie's self-defense claim was absurd and had been rejected in earlier appeals.

Trottie's attorneys also contended the dose of pentobarbital for his lethal injection was past its effectiveness date and could subject him to unconstitutional "tortuous" pain.

The state responded that the drug doesn't expire until the end of the month and that tests showed proper potency. They argued the appeal seeking details of the drug was merely another attempt to force prison officials to disclose the compounding pharmacy that provides the execution drugs, something the courts repeatedly have refused to order.

Trottie's lethal injection was the eighth this year in Texas, and the first in the nation's most active death penalty state since recent executions went awry in Oklahoma and Arizona. Unlike those states, where a drug combination is used for capital punishment, Texas uses a single lethal dose of pentobarbital.

13 -  General Death Penalty / Executed Offenders (Graveyard) / Re: Willie Tyrone Trottie - TX - 9/10/14

Started by Grinning Grim Reaper - Last post by ChevyWolken on: September 10, 2014, 09:27:39 AM

"If I wasn't in fear and terror," he said, "I don't know what it is."



Of course, does he really thinks thats a good excuse? If you read the history, this could have been prevented with all the violance that happened before the murder, now it's too late and it's time to pay the price  >:(   

14 -  General Death Penalty / Executed Offenders (Graveyard) / Re: Earl Ringo Jr. - MO - 9/10/14

Started by Grinning Grim Reaper - Last post by Amanda on: September 09, 2014, 11:10:35 PM

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/09/10/missouri-execution/15374243/

Early Wed. Sept. 10, 2014

Missouri carries out 8th execution of 2014

BONNE TERRE, Mo. (AP) — A Missouri inmate was put to death Wednesday for killing two people during a restaurant robbery in 1998, the eighth execution in the state this year and the 10th since November.

Earl Ringo Jr., 40, and an accomplice killed delivery driver Dennis Poyser and manager trainee JoAnna Baysinger at a Ruby Tuesday restaurant in Columbia in the early hours of July 4, 1998. Poyser and Baysinger were shot to death at point-blank range.

The Department of Corrections said Ringo was executed at 12:22 a.m. by lethal injection and pronounced dead at 12:31 a.m.

Courts and Gov. Jay Nixon had refused to halt the execution over concerns raised by Ringo's attorneys, who, among other things, questioned Missouri's use of a pre-execution sedative, midazolam. Attorneys argued that the drug could dull Ringo's senses and leave him unable to express any pain or suffering during the process.

Midazolam has come under scrutiny after it was used in problematic executions earlier this year in Ohio, Oklahoma and Arizona. In each case, witnesses said the inmates gasped after their executions began and continued to labor for air before being pronounced dead.

A clemency petition to Nixon had also cited concerns about the fact that Ringo was convicted and sentenced to death by an all-white jury.

On July 3, 1998, Ringo shared with Quentin Jones his plan to rob the Ruby Tuesday restaurant in Columbia, where he once worked. Jones agreed to join him.

Before sunrise on July 4, Ringo and Jones hid behind a grease pit in the back of the restaurant. Poyser and Baysinger arrived and entered the restaurant. Ringo followed them and shot Poyser, 45, killing him instantly.

He ordered Baysinger, 22, to open a safe. She pulled out $1,400 and gave it to him.

Ringo gave the gun to Jones, who stood with the weapon pointed at Baysinger's head for a minute and a half before pulling the trigger.

Interviews with restaurant workers and former workers led police to Ringo, according to Kevin Crane, who was the Boone County prosecutor at the time. Detectives found a blue ski mask, gun receipt, bulletproof vest and other evidence at the home of Ringo's mother.

Ringo admitted to the robbery but claimed the shootings were in self-defense. He was convicted in 1999 and sentenced to death.

Jones, of Louisville, Kentucky, pleaded guilty to first-degree murder and was sentenced to life in prison, but he was spared the death penalty when he agreed to testify against Ringo.

Ringo's attorneys had asked a federal appeals court to postpone the execution until a hearing over Missouri's use of midazolam. Attorney Richard Sindel claimed that Missouri's use of midazolam essentially violates its own protocol, which provides for pentobarbital as the lone execution drug.

St. Louis Public Radio reported last week that Missouri administered midazolam to all nine inmates put to death since November. Corrections department spokesman David Owen said midazolam "is used to relieve the offender's level of anxiety" and is not part of the actual execution process.

The execution was one of two scheduled for Wednesday in the U.S. Texas was scheduled to execute Willie Trottie later in the day for killing his common-law wife and her brother in 1993.

Trottie's execution would be Texas' eighth this year. Florida has performed seven executions in 2014, and all other states have a combined six.

~~
Great job, Missouri! Looking forward to Texas carrying out justice later on tomorrow (it is still Tues. Sept. 9th here in California).

15 -  General Death Penalty / Executed Offenders (Graveyard) / Re: Willie Tyrone Trottie - TX - 9/10/14

Started by Grinning Grim Reaper - Last post by Grinning Grim Reaper on: September 09, 2014, 12:42:10 PM

And in the ambulance chasers will try anything category...

Death Row Appeal Alleges Execution Drugs Have Expired


by Terri Langford Sept. 9, 2014

Attorneys for death row inmate Willie Trottie, who is scheduled for execution this week, say the lethal injection drugs that will be used on him have expired, according to an appeal filed early Tuesday in the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans.  ;D

The Texas Department of Criminal Justice insists the drug it uses, pentobarbital, has not expired.

Trottie, who was convicted more than 21 years ago for fatally shooting his wife and her brother in a fit of rage, is scheduled to be executed Wednesday evening in Huntsville.

The eleventh-hour debate is detailed in an appeal filed on Trottie's behalf by attorney Maurie Levin of Philadelphia. She argues that even though TDCJ states that the drugs will not expire until the end of the month, the agency's claim "is not supported by a shred of evidence, expert or otherwise."   ;D

"There is a substantial risk that the use of expired drugs will subject Mr. Trottie to tortuous pain," she writes.  ;D

Jason Clark, a TDCJ spokesman, said the drug to be used, pentobarbital, "is not expired and has a use-by date of September 2014."  "The drugs have been tested for potency and defect," he said. "The drugs have a potency of 108 percent and were found to have no defects."

For the past year, TDCJ and prisons nationwide who execute prisoners by injection have had to turn to compounding pharmacies to make the lethal batches, because drugmakers will not sell it for use in executions. 

Clark said that according to the "industry standard," this particular compounded drug can be used until the last day of September.

Per TDCJ's execution protocol, there will be four 2.5-gram vials of pentobarbital on hand for Trottie's scheduled execution. Two of those vials have the September use-by date, and are expected to be used in the execution. Two other vials — the backup vials — are not scheduled for expiration until October. Clark said all of the vials were tested by a company that checks compounded drugs for potency.

If carried out, Trottie's execution will be the 516th in Texas since the state reinstated the death penalty in 1982, and the eighth for TDCJ so far this year.

Trottie told the Houston Chronicle last week that the May 1993 bloodbath that killed his common-law wife Barbara Nell Canada, 24, and her brother, Titus Canada, 29, and wounded their mother and sister, "was a simple heat of passion."

"If I wasn't in fear and terror," he said, "I don't know what it is."

www.thetexastribune.com

16 -  General Death Penalty / Oklahoma Death Penalty News / Re: Oklahoma Death Penalty News

Started by heidi salazar - Last post by Grinning Grim Reaper on: September 09, 2014, 11:22:03 AM

Oklahoma prisons director: Agency to get new equipment for executions, tool to find vein


Published September 08, 2014 Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY –  Oklahoma is renovating its death chamber and buying new equipment for executions, including a tool to allow staff to more easily find suitable veins for lethal injections after a troubled execution in April, the director of the state Department of Corrections said Monday.

Director Robert Patton said state prison officials began reviewing Oklahoma's execution guidelines immediately after the April 29 execution of Clayton Lockett.  He said the agency intends to have new guidelines and equipment in place in time for the state's next scheduled execution on Nov. 13.

"We are working very hard to get the protocol done," Patton said. "It is the intention of the agency to be ready by the November execution."

A report released by the state Department of Public Safety last week blamed Lockett's flawed lethal injection on poor placement of intravenous lines and said the medical team could not find suitable veins in Lockett's arms, legs, neck and feet before the line was inserted into his groin. Patton said the Corrections Department will be getting a vein finder to help with that issue.

The report included 11 recommendations for improving the execution process, including more training for medical personnel, better communication between authorities who are part of the process and acquiring additional supplies of lethal drugs and equipment.

"It is our intention to adopt all of the recommendations from the report that are within our authority," Patton said. A recommendation that Oklahoma hold executions at least seven days apart cannot be adopted by the agency because it's up to the courts to set execution dates, he said.

Republican Gov. Mary Fallin has said she wants the new guidelines implemented before the state conducts another execution. Patton said he will inform Fallin if new procedures aren't in place or training isn't done before the next scheduled execution, on Nov. 13.

That's when Charles Frederick Warner is scheduled to die for the 1997 rape and murder of 11-month-old Adrianna Walker, the daughter of his roommate. Warner was set to die on the same day as Lockett, but his execution was postponed after problems developed during Lockett's lethal injection.

Lockett was convicted of shooting Stephanie Nieman, 19, with a sawed-off shotgun and watching as two accomplices buried her alive in 1999.

Patton said upgrades to the death chamber will include new communication devices so government officials can know what's going on. He said the improvements will create more room inside the death chamber and allow the prison director and other staff members to be inside during the execution. Previously, the prison director was in a witness viewing area.

"I was standing outside talking to the governor's legal staff," Patton said. "Moving forward I will be inside and in direct communication, eyes on what's going on."

Patton said he does not yet know the cost of the renovations.

Patton declined comment on whether the sedative midazolam, which was used for the first time in the state with Lockett, will continue to be part of Oklahoma's lethal injection method, which is being challenged in a federal lawsuit filed by Warner and other death row inmates.

Patton said he hopes to get the new guidelines to the state attorney general's office for approval in the next couple of weeks. They will then be posted on the prison system's website, Patton said.

"At that time we will begin training staff on the new policy and new protocol," he said.
 
www.foxnews.com

17 -  General Death Penalty / Executed Offenders (Graveyard) / Re: Earl Ringo Jr. - MO - 9/10/14

Started by Grinning Grim Reaper - Last post by Grinning Grim Reaper on: September 09, 2014, 11:00:59 AM

Missouri Fights Lethal Injection Suit on Eve of Earl Ringo Execution

 
By Tracy Connor
 
A federal appeals court will hear arguments Tuesday on a lawsuit filed by 23 death row inmates who are challenging Missouri's secrecy-shrouded lethal injection protocol, but the outcome won't affect nine of the plaintiffs — because they have already been executed.  ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

One plaintiff in the suit, Earl Ringo Jr., could be put to death at the state penitentiary in Bonne Terre just hours after the hearing on the suit, which the losing side is likely to appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Ringo is pressing last-minute appeals on several fronts, including a claim that racial bias played a role in his sentencing by an all-white jury. One of his court filings argued the execution should be canceled because of revelations that prison officials have been quietly using the controversial drug midazolam on condemned inmates.

Ringo's lawyer says he believes midazolam isn't being used simply to calm the nerves of condemned inmates but to "mask the symptoms of the lethal injection drug" — the pentobarbital.

"The Department's actions shock the conscience, and a hearing is required to determine whether the prison intends to continue its pattern of unconstitutional executions," defense lawyer Richard Sindel wrote in a motion.  ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

Corrections officials said midazolam is "not part of the actual execution."

"A sedative is administered to relieve the offender's level of anxiety in advance of the execution. The only lethal chemical the department uses is pentobarbital," the agency said in a statement.

Elsewhere, midazolam is used as a lethal agent.

For Missouri's death row inmates, however, midazolam has not been the primary issue. Instead, the suit that goes before the Eighth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday morning focuses on claims that the Show-Me State is violating the Constitution by refusing to name the compounding pharmacies that sell the pentobarbital.

The prisoners are also challenging lower court rulings that have presented a paradox: Even if they successfully show an execution method would be unduly painful, they must recommend a more humane alternative to end their own lives.

While Texas remains the leading capital-punishment state in America — 16 murderers were put to death in the state last year — Missouri could break its own state record for executions by January. If his appeals fail, Ringo will be the eighth prisoner to enter the death chamber in 2014, the most in 15 years.

State officials have shown no inclination to slow the pace. In fact, Attorney General Chris Koster suggested this year that the prison system should make its own lethal injections so it doesn't have to rely on suppliers that demand anonymity.

Ringo is a plaintiff in the inmates' suit the Eighth Circuit will hear en banc, meaning all the judges will weigh in as opposed to a select few. A smaller panel of judges from the court rejected his individual request for a stay of execution on Tuesday.

Relatives of Ringo's victims did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

www.nbcnews.com

18 -  General Death Penalty / Executed Offenders (Graveyard) / Re: Willie Tyrone Trottie - TX - 9/10/14

Started by Grinning Grim Reaper - Last post by Grinning Grim Reaper on: September 09, 2014, 08:41:50 AM

Media Advisory: Willie Tyrone Trottie scheduled for execution


AUSTIN – Pursuant to a court order by the 262nd Judicial District Court of Harris County, Willie Tyrone Trottie is scheduled for execution after 6 p.m. on Sept. 10, 2014.

In 1993, a Harris County jury found Trottie guilty of capital murder for the murders of Barbara and Titus Canada pursuant to a planned home invasion.

FACTS OF THE CRIME

The United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit described the murders of Barbara and Titus Canada as follows:

Trottie and Barbara Canada met and began dating in about 1989. Shortly thereafter, the two moved in together and had a child. In September 1992, the couple separated and Barbara moved in with her family.

Trottie’s behavior towards Barbara became increasingly violent following their 1992 separation. According to state witnesses that testified at Trottie’s trial, Trottie warned Barbara that he would kill her if she did not return to him and repeated the threat several times in the months after she moved out. Barbara’s close friend testified that Trottie called Barbara “constantly” at home and at work, begging her to come back to him. Trottie hit Barbara, bumped Barbara’s car with his own while it was traveling at sixty to sixty-five miles per hour, and once kidnapped her, releasing her only after she promised to reunite with him.

Barbara obtained a protective order against Trottie in March 1993. Nevertheless, state witnesses testified that Trottie telephoned Barbara in April and told her that she had until May 1, 1993 to return to him, or else he would kill her. On May 3, 1993, Trottie called Barbara again and told her that “he wasn't going to wait around anymore” and again threatened to kill her. One witness testified that Trottie also threatened Barbara’s brother Titus Canada because, according to Trottie, he had gotten “in the way.”

Trottie arrived at the Canada residence at approximately 11 p.m. on the night of May 3, 1993, armed with a semiautomatic 9mm pistol. At the time, there were five children under the age of seven in the house, along with numerous other family members. According to state witnesses, Trottie opened fire immediately, wounding Barbara’s mother, sister, and brother. Barbara’s brother returned fire with a .380 caliber pistol and shot Trottie numerous times. Though wounded, Trottie cornered Barbara in a bedroom and, while she lay on the ground, shot her eleven times. Trottie then returned to the area where Barbara’s brother was lying wounded and, in the view of at least two small children, fired two shots into the back of Barbara’s brother’s head, killing him. Trottie left the Canada home and was arrested a short time later in the emergency room of a nearby hospital.

PROCEDURAL HISTORY

On May 3, 1993, Trottie was indicted in the 262nd Judicial District Court of Harris County for the capital offense of murdering Barbara and Titus Canada during the same criminal transaction. After Trottie pleaded not guilty, a jury found him guilty of the capital offense. Following a separate punishment hearing, the court assessed Trottie’s punishment at death.

On Sept. 20, 1995, the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals affirmed Trottie’s conviction and sentence in an unpublished opinion.

On Aug. 18, 1997, Trottie filed a state application for writ of habeas corpus in the trial court.

On July 10, 2008, the trial court submitted findings of fact and conclusions of law recommending that Trottie be denied relief.

On Feb. 11, 2009, the Court of Criminal Appeals adopted the trial court’s findings and conclusions and denied Trottie habeas relief.

On March 4, 2010, Trottie filed a federal habeas petition in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas, Houston Division.

On Sept. 30, 2011, the federal district court denied Trottie’s petition, and denied him permission to appeal.

Trottie sought permission to appeal in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. On June 14, 2013, the Fifth Circuit denied Trottie’s request.

On Nov. 13, 2013, Trottie filed a petition for writ of certiorari in the U.S. Supreme Court. The high court denied certiorari review on March 24, 2014.

PRIOR CRIMINAL HISTORY

Under Texas law, the rules of evidence prevent certain prior criminal acts from being presented to a jury during the guilt-innocence phase of the trial. However, once a defendant is found guilty, jurors are presented information about the defendant’s prior criminal conduct during the second phase of the trial – which is when they determine the defendant’s punishment.

The State presented the following evidence of Trottie’s future dangerousness. Jesse Doyle, a teacher and principal at Bolton High School in Alexandria, Louisiana, testified that he recommended Trottie’s expulsion from school in March 1987. That summer, Trottie stole $3000 of band equipment and other items from the school. Trottie entered a guilty plea to a reduced charge, and punishment was assessed at six months of probation.

The State also elicited testimony regarding Trottie’s three prior convictions in Harris County. In December 1988, Trottie was arrested at a grocery store for carrying a loaded .38 revolver. Trottie pleaded guilty to the misdemeanor offense of carrying a weapon and was sentenced to 90 days in jail, probated for a period of one year. In July 1990, a Texas Department of Public Safety trooper stopped Trottie for speeding and observed a loaded .45 caliber revolver under Trottie’s car seat. Trottie pleaded guilty to the misdemeanor offense of carrying a weapon and was sentenced to 20 days in jail. In September 1990, the service manager at a Houston car dealership where Trottie worked discovered that Trottie had a stolen car on dealership property. Trottie told the manager that he intended to have the engine removed from the stolen car and placed in a similar car. Police arrested Trottie in the dealership, and Trottie pleaded guilty to the felony offense of theft by receiving. Punishment was assessed at five years deferred adjudication probation.

Lynn Clark was Trottie’s probation officer from Sept. 24, 1990, until Feb. 25, 1993, when Trottie quit reporting. Clark described Trottie as a hard worker and good probationer, but Trottie was very upset over the breakup with Barbara and implied that he might kill her. As a result, Clark took the unusual step of calling Barbara and advising her to obtain a protective order, which is something she generally did not do in her probationers’ cases. Trottie also told Clark that he was involved in a March 1990 shooting where he wounded an individual after that individual fired at him.

In October 1992, Trottie and a cousin went to Barbara’s house to visit Trottie’s child. Trottie told Barbara that he just wanted to talk to her, but then he grabbed Barbara by the neck, threw her on the couch, and choked her. After he was forced to leave the house, Trottie shot out the tires on Barbara’s car.

Frederick Rusk testified that Trottie once pulled a gun on him in front of Barbara’s house. He heard Trottie was handling his daughter in a rough manner and wanted to talk to him about it. Rusk followed Barbara and Trottie to Barbara’s grandmother’s house. When Rusk got there, Trottie stepped out of a car and fired at him, but the shot did not hit Rusk or his car. Rusk decided not to press charges against Trottie.

www.texasattorneygeneral.gov

The 5th Circuit denied Trottie yesterday...I would bet his ambulance chasers have gone to SCOTUS
.

19 -  General Death Penalty / Executed Offenders (Graveyard) / Re: Willie Tyrone Trottie - TX - 9/10/14

Started by Grinning Grim Reaper - Last post by Grinning Grim Reaper on: September 09, 2014, 08:36:24 AM

Missouri, Texas Plan Executions Wednesday


ST. LOUIS — Sep 8, 2014, 9:26 PM ET

By JIM SALTER and MICHAEL GRACZYK Associated Press

Associated Press

Two of the nation's most active death penalty states are planning executions Wednesday, even as attorneys for the condemned men try to save them.

Earl Ringo Jr. is scheduled to die at 12:01 a.m. for killing two people during a robbery at a Columbia, Missouri, restaurant in 1998. Hours later, Texas plans to execute Willie Trottie for fatally shooting his common-law wife and her brother in Houston in 1993.

The executions would be the eighth this year in both states. Florida also has performed seven executions in 2014. All other states have a combined six executions.

Both Missouri and Texas use pentobarbital as their execution drug but decline to disclose where the drug is obtained.

"They don't tell you what it is and where it comes from," Trottie told The Associated Press. "What I've learned in 20 years here on death row is all you can do is say, 'OK.'

"I'm ready whichever way it goes. If God says, 'Yes,' I'm ready."

Ringo, 40, did not immediately respond to interview requests. He and another man robbed a Ruby Tuesday restaurant in Columbia where Ringo previously worked, ambushing a deliveryman and manager trainee in the early-morning hours of July 4, 1998.

The accomplice, Quentin Jones, pleaded guilty to first-degree murder and was spared the death penalty by agreeing to testify against Ringo, the mastermind of the crime.

An appeal in U.S. District Court in Kansas City has asked that the execution be postponed until a hearing can determine whether Missouri's use of a pre-execution sedative is actually part of the execution process and violates the inmate's constitutional rights. Attorneys for Ringo say the dose of midazolam, also known by the brand name Versed, could make it difficult for the inmate to express any pain he might feel during the process.

"If the drug (the sedative) renders him incompetent, we want to know why they're doing that to him immediately before the execution proceeds," Ringo's attorney, Richard Sindel, said Monday.

In a response filed in court, the Missouri Attorney General's Office said Ringo "has long been aware that Missouri uses Versed and valium as pre-execution sedatives."

Midazolam has come under scrutiny after it was used in problematic executions earlier this year in Ohio, Oklahoma and Arizona. In each case, witnesses said the inmates gasped after their executions began and continued to labor for air before being pronounced dead.

Separately, Ringo's attorneys have asked Gov. Jay Nixon to grant clemency on several grounds, including concerns that race played a role in his death sentence. Ringo is black; he was convicted and sentenced by an all-white jury.

Trottie, who turned 45 Monday, shot and killed 24-year-old Barbara Canada, and her 28-year-old brother, Titus, at the Canada family home in Houston. Canada's mother and sister were wounded.

Lawyers for Trottie argued in their appeal that the one-time deliveryman and security guard suffered poor representation in his initial trial when his counsel failed to present witnesses who would have told jurors Trottie and Barbara Canada were romantically engaged at the time of the killings. Late Monday, the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rejected the appeal.

Trottie said he and Barbara Canada were on "good terms" despite an on-again, off-again relationship. Trottie said he was defending himself against Titus Canada, who shot first. He said the shooting of his wife was accidental.

"It wasn't like I just walked in there and gunned her down," he said.

Johnny Sutton, the lead prosecutor at Trottie's trial, said evidence showed that's exactly what happened.

"He hunted them down," Sutton said. "The self-defense claim is absolutely ridiculous. He kicked in their door. ... They already were worried about him. He was making threats and trying to run her off the road.

"This one was so cold and calculated."

www.abcnews.com

20 -  General Death Penalty / Executed Offenders (Graveyard) / Re: Earl Ringo Jr. - MO - 9/10/14

Started by Grinning Grim Reaper - Last post by Grinning Grim Reaper on: September 09, 2014, 08:34:18 AM

Missouri, Texas Plan Executions Wednesday


ST. LOUIS — Sep 8, 2014, 9:26 PM ET

By JIM SALTER and MICHAEL GRACZYK Associated Press

Associated Press

Two of the nation's most active death penalty states are planning executions Wednesday, even as attorneys for the condemned men try to save them.

Earl Ringo Jr. is scheduled to die at 12:01 a.m. for killing two people during a robbery at a Columbia, Missouri, restaurant in 1998. Hours later, Texas plans to execute Willie Trottie for fatally shooting his common-law wife and her brother in Houston in 1993.

The executions would be the eighth this year in both states. Florida also has performed seven executions in 2014. All other states have a combined six executions.

Both Missouri and Texas use pentobarbital as their execution drug but decline to disclose where the drug is obtained.

"They don't tell you what it is and where it comes from," Trottie told The Associated Press. "What I've learned in 20 years here on death row is all you can do is say, 'OK.'

"I'm ready whichever way it goes. If God says, 'Yes,' I'm ready."

Ringo, 40, did not immediately respond to interview requests. He and another man robbed a Ruby Tuesday restaurant in Columbia where Ringo previously worked, ambushing a deliveryman and manager trainee in the early-morning hours of July 4, 1998.

The accomplice, Quentin Jones, pleaded guilty to first-degree murder and was spared the death penalty by agreeing to testify against Ringo, the mastermind of the crime.

An appeal in U.S. District Court in Kansas City has asked that the execution be postponed until a hearing can determine whether Missouri's use of a pre-execution sedative is actually part of the execution process and violates the inmate's constitutional rights. Attorneys for Ringo say the dose of midazolam, also known by the brand name Versed, could make it difficult for the inmate to express any pain he might feel during the process.

"If the drug (the sedative) renders him incompetent, we want to know why they're doing that to him immediately before the execution proceeds," Ringo's attorney, Richard Sindel, said Monday.

In a response filed in court, the Missouri Attorney General's Office said Ringo "has long been aware that Missouri uses Versed and valium as pre-execution sedatives."

Midazolam has come under scrutiny after it was used in problematic executions earlier this year in Ohio, Oklahoma and Arizona. In each case, witnesses said the inmates gasped after their executions began and continued to labor for air before being pronounced dead.

Separately, Ringo's attorneys have asked Gov. Jay Nixon to grant clemency on several grounds, including concerns that race played a role in his death sentence. Ringo is black; he was convicted and sentenced by an all-white jury.

Trottie, who turned 45 Monday, shot and killed 24-year-old Barbara Canada, and her 28-year-old brother, Titus, at the Canada family home in Houston. Canada's mother and sister were wounded.

Lawyers for Trottie argued in their appeal that the one-time deliveryman and security guard suffered poor representation in his initial trial when his counsel failed to present witnesses who would have told jurors Trottie and Barbara Canada were romantically engaged at the time of the killings. Late Monday, the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rejected the appeal.

Trottie said he and Barbara Canada were on "good terms" despite an on-again, off-again relationship. Trottie said he was defending himself against Titus Canada, who shot first. He said the shooting of his wife was accidental.

"It wasn't like I just walked in there and gunned her down," he said.

Johnny Sutton, the lead prosecutor at Trottie's trial, said evidence showed that's exactly what happened.

"He hunted them down," Sutton said. "The self-defense claim is absolutely ridiculous. He kicked in their door. ... They already were worried about him. He was making threats and trying to run her off the road.

"This one was so cold and calculated."

www.abcnews.com

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