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11 -  General Death Penalty / Stays of Execution / Re: Richard Gerald Jordan - MS - 8/27/15 - Stayed

Started by Grinning Grim Reaper - Last post by Rick4404 on: August 27, 2015, 07:33:54 PM

Does anyone know if the gas chamber is still usable in Mississippi, or was it mothballed once the state switched to lethal injection? 

12 -  General Death Penalty / U.S. Death Penalty Discussion / Re: Death penalty supporters turn over 166,000 signatures

Started by Granny B - Last post by Rick4404 on: August 27, 2015, 07:24:28 PM

Once the petitions were turned in to the secretary of state's office, in fact, it did have the legal effect of temporarily suspending the law from taking effect.  The petitions will now be sorted and sent out by county to each of the state's 93 counties; where the local county auditors will compare the signatures to voter registration records to ascertain that each signer of the petition indeed is a registered Nebraska voter. Once that verification process has been completed, the petitions will be returned to the secretary of state's office, where the signatures will be tabulated to make certain that there are enough valid signatures for the referendum to be placed on the ballot in next year's general election. 

The sticking point right now is that Nebraska isn't presently able to carry out an execution by lethal injection.  The state lacks two of the three drugs that its present execution protocol calls for.  While Nebraska law simply declares that the lethal injection be carried out by an intravenous injection of a substance or substances sufficient in quantity and strength to cause a condemned person's death, but does not specify the drugs to be used. 

However, the state's execution protocol does specify that one of the drugs to be used is sodium thiopental, which of course, the makers of have refused to make it available to U.S. prisons for the purposes of carrying out executions. 

Nebraska will likely have to change the protocol and remove the specifications as to the drugs that are to be used in an execution.  Since the execution protocol is the same as an  administrative regulation or rule; the protocol will have to be amended and resubmitted for approval.  The Department of Correctional Services cannot merely do this on their own volition.  The proposed changes to the protocol will have to be brought forward for a period of public comment as well as at least one public hearing.  Once that's done, the protocol would be submitted to the governor for his approval. 

So, if as expected enough petition signatures are certified to put the death penalty repeal bill on the ballot next year as a referendum, the state will almost certainly have to go through the process of changing its execution protocol, before an inmate can be executed. 

14 -  General Death Penalty / Stays of Execution / Re: Richard Gerald Jordan - MS - 8/27/15 - Stayed

Started by Grinning Grim Reaper - Last post by phlebbb on: August 27, 2015, 10:10:33 AM

Judge orders temporary halt to Mississippi executions

 JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A federal judge has temporarily blocked the state of Mississippi from carrying out executions.

 U.S. District Judge Henry T. Wingate issued a temporary restraining order Tuesday in a case where three inmates have sued.

 An online federal court docket reflects that Wingate has issued a restraining order, but no written copy is available. Jim Craig, a lawyer for two inmates, says the order was given verbally.

 A spokeswoman for the Mississippi Department of Corrections says the state will appeal.

 Prisoners say they face risks of excruciating pain during an execution, which violates the U.S. Constitution's Eighth Amendment prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment.

 The lawsuit says there's no guarantee that Mississippi can mix a safe and effective anesthetic to knock out prisoners, and that prisoners could remain conscious during execution.

www.abcnews.com

 


            And did any of these "pillars of the community" stop to think of the pain their victim felt while they were murdering them?????These asshats need to be shown the same amount of mercy they showed their victims....no more no less.... >:( >:( >:( >:( >:(

15 -  General Death Penalty / Stays of Execution / Re: Richard Gerald Jordan - MS - 8/27/15 - Stayed

Started by Grinning Grim Reaper - Last post by Grinning Grim Reaper on: August 27, 2015, 06:50:40 AM

Judge orders temporary halt to Mississippi executions

 JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A federal judge has temporarily blocked the state of Mississippi from carrying out executions.

 U.S. District Judge Henry T. Wingate issued a temporary restraining order Tuesday in a case where three inmates have sued.

 An online federal court docket reflects that Wingate has issued a restraining order, but no written copy is available. Jim Craig, a lawyer for two inmates, says the order was given verbally.

 A spokeswoman for the Mississippi Department of Corrections says the state will appeal.

 Prisoners say they face risks of excruciating pain during an execution, which violates the U.S. Constitution's Eighth Amendment prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment.

 The lawsuit says there's no guarantee that Mississippi can mix a safe and effective anesthetic to knock out prisoners, and that prisoners could remain conscious during execution.

www.abcnews.com

16 -  General Death Penalty / U.S. Death Penalty Discussion / Death penalty supporters turn over 166,000 signatures

Started by Granny B - Last post by Granny B on: August 26, 2015, 03:14:33 PM

Death penalty supporters turn over 166,000 signatures
By JOANNE YOUNG | LINCOLN JOURNAL STAR



Death penalty supporters turned in petitions Wednesday to the Secretary of State's office to be verified. They say the have almost 167,000 signatures, enough to suspend repeal and put death penalty before voters next year

It appears voters in Nebraska will have the final say on the future of the death penalty.

Supporters of the death penalty in Nebraska said they turned over 166,692 petition signatures Wednesday, which if verified, would suspend the repeal of capital punishment in the state until the issue goes before voters in November 2016.

Nebraskans for the Death Penalty needed about 57,000 verified signatures -- 5 percent of the state's registered voters -- to put the issue to a vote and about 114,000 -- 10 percent of registered voters -- to stop the repeal from going into effect until after the 2016 vote takes place.

Standing in front of boxes and boxes of signed petitions at a Wednesday news conference, state Sen. Mike Groene said Nebraskans -- the second house -- will now have their say.

State Treasurer Don Stenberg, state Sen. Beau McCoy, and Vivian Tuttle, mother of Evonne Tuttle, who was killed in 2002 during a bank robbery in Norfolk, were at the news conference. Stenberg and McCoy co-chaired the petition drive. Groene, of North Platte, and Tuttle said they gathered more than 1,700 and 1,900 signatures, respectively.

Groene said people "flocked" to sign petitions.

The group began collecting signatures June 6, and paid circulators and volunteers spent every day since circulating petitions in all counties across the state. McCoy said over half of the 595 petition circulators were volunteers.

Organizers of the petition drive said they expected to have no problem meeting the additional threshold of signatures from 5 percent of registered voters in at least 38 counties. Petitions, they said, include signatures from 10 percent of registered voters in 70 of the state's 93 counties.

In May, Nebraska made international headlines when the Legislature voted 30-19 to override Gov. Pete Ricketts’ veto of LB268, introduced by Omaha Sen. Ernie Chambers, which repealed the death penalty. The count included votes to repeal cast by senators who identify as conservative. One of the senators who worked hard to gather repeal votes in the Legislature was Lincoln Sen. Colby Coash, who identifies himself as a conservative Republican, and who is also Catholic.

Ricketts and his father, Joe Ricketts, have been reported as the largest individual financial contributors to the campaign, which had raised $652,000 by the end of July, as reported to the Nebraska Accountability and Disclosure Commission. At the last filing with the commission, the governor and his father had contributed at least $300,000.

The Judicial Crisis Network, a group committed to the U.S. Constitution and to limited government, contributed $200,000 on July 27.

Nebraskans for Public Safety, which favors repeal of the death penalty, had raised $433,500 as of the end of July. About $400,000 of that came from the Proteus Action League of Amherst, Massachusetts, a civil rights and social action advocacy group.

Another group, Nebraskans for Alternatives to the Death Penalty, is closely monitoring the initial results of the death penalty referendum signature-gathering campaign and will await an official decision from the Nebraska Secretary of State’s office, the group said in a news release.

“Just like the legislators they elected, we believe the more Nebraskans learn about the failures of capital punishment, the more they will be inclined to get rid of it,” said the Rev. Stephen Griffith, incoming executive director of the organization.

Griffith said that while it looks like the pro-death penalty group got signatures from 10 percent of registered voters, it appears to have failed to attract broad-based financial support because Gov. Pete Ricketts, his father and a handful of their associates provided the bulk of funds.

“It is evident that grassroots Nebraskans have already rejected the death penalty with their pocketbooks,” Griffith said.

During the next 14 months, he said, Nebraskans for Alternatives to the Death Penalty will continue to do what it has done for three decades: Have conversations with Nebraskans across the political spectrum about why capital punishment has failed in the state.

Matt Maly, coordinator for Nebraska Conservatives Concerned About the Death Penalty, said he’s sure Nebraskans who learn about capital punishment will turn against it.

“Once our state’s Second House learns all of the facts, we are confident they too will reject our broken death penalty,” Maly said.

The petitions will go to Secretary of State John Gale's office, where they will be counted, separated by county and numbered, and then sent to local officials for verification.

Local election officials in each county will verify whether the signer is a registered voter. Each signature will be compared with voter registration records.

Those officials must return the verified petitions to the secretary of state within 40 days after receiving them, although an additional 10 days can be granted in unusual circumstances. The secretary of state will then review the petitions and total the number of valid signatures. If there are sufficient valid signatures, he will certify the measure for the general election ballot.

Attorney General Doug Peterson will write the ballot question or title that summarizes in 100 words or less the purpose of the measure. He will also provide material that explains the effect of a vote for or against the measure to appear on the ballot.

If the language is not challenged in court, a pamphlet written and produced by the secretary of state that contains the ballot title and arguments for and against the measure will be made available to voters at least six weeks prior to the election.

Public hearings on the measure will be conducted in each congressional district within eight weeks prior to the election.


http://journalstar.com/news/state-and-regional/govt-and-politics/death-penalty-supporters-turn-over-signatures/article_ddf6eec1-641d-50d0-a0d5-4055129a725a.html



17 -  Forum Rules and Information / Introductions / Re: I'm Back...

Started by Elric of Melnibone - Last post by time2prtee on: August 26, 2015, 01:19:14 PM

Welcome aboard Cheryl!

Lee

18 -  General Death Penalty / Scheduled Executions / Gustavo Julian Garcia - TX - 2/16/16

Started by Grinning Grim Reaper - Last post by Grinning Grim Reaper on: August 26, 2015, 09:38:42 AM

Gustavo Garcia was convicted in the shotgun slaying of Craig Turski, 43, during the robbery of a beverage store. Turski, a store clerk, was shot in the head and right side. Garcia was arrested following a second robbery at a Texaco station. Police found Garcia hiding in the beer cooler and his co-defendant, Christopher Vargas, standing over the station attendant after he had been shot once in the back of the head.

Garcia was sentenced to death in Collin County in January 1992.

http://www.tdcj.state.tx.us/death_ro...xecutions.html

19 -  General Death Penalty / Stays of Execution / Re: Hector Morales - PA - 08/28/2015 - Stayed

Started by heidi salazar - Last post by time2prtee on: August 25, 2015, 04:18:49 PM

A stay in Pa??What a shocker !!!Who would have guessed that one..... >:( >:( >:(


Yeppers...quite a shocker  ;)

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