Oregon Death Penalty News

Started by Jeff1857, January 06, 2009, 08:31:40 PM

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Jeff1857

Killing Time----Dead Men Waiting on Oregon's Death Row.


In a forgotten cinder-block room in Salem lurks a monument to Oregon';s cowardice and ambivalence toward the death penalty.

A metal gurney with extensions like the arms of a cross, it stands waiting to hold the next person executed by lethal injection under Oregon's 24-year-old capital punishment statute. The gurney has been used only twice in those years, and only then because those men, both convicted of multiple murders, volunteered for death by waiving their appeals.

The last one--Harry Charles Moore, who shot his half-sister and her ex-husband to death in Salem--died 11 years ago in this gray fluorescent-lit room, tied down with leather straps cracked and dried with age.

When an inmate is scheduled for execution, he spends his final days in a death-watch cell under 24-hour observation. When the time comes, he's moved across the hall to the execution room. The executioner and the victims' families, if they choose, watch through 1-way mirrors. The prison superintendent stands beside the gurney. A blue phone in the hall outside connects directly to the office of the attorney general. A red phone goes to the governor, who gives the final go-ahead.

In the last moments, the executioner pushes a series of plungers from a small room off the death chamber, sending a 3-drug cocktail of lethal poison down tubes strung through holes in the wall.

Oregon's machinery of death is clearly in place. But since the U.S. Supreme Court allowed states to resume executions in 1976, Oregon has killed only Moore and Douglas Wright, who was executed in 1996 for killing three homeless men in a remote area of Wasco County.

Contrast that record with that of Texas, a state that has offed 405 convicted criminals since 1982, making it the No. 1 state for executions.

Oregon's execution chamber has stood empty for 3,900-plus days--since before Harry Potter became a household name. Meanwhile, 35 men sit alone this week in their cells on Oregon's death row. The longest-serving inmate, a murderous prison escapee named Michael McDonnell, was sentenced to death 23 years ago. Yet his case, like all the others, remains on appeal. There are no executions scheduled.

"We have a situation in Oregon where nobody but a volunteer gets executed," says Norm Frink, the Multnomah County senior deputy district attorney who oversees murder prosecutions in the county.

That's because we live in 1 of 10 states that have capital punishment but have executed fewer than 3 people since 1976. Experts say Oregon's next involuntary execution will probably take place around 2012 at the earliest.

Death penalty opponents may think it's fine that executions aren't happening. But bear in mind the state intends to kill these men someday--though they may go to the gallows with a walker or in a wheelchair.

Meanwhile, we spend millions to keep all 35 men on death row. Millions more in public money is spent paying lawyers to wage endless battles in court. Victims' families must relive their tragedies again and again while attending multiple court hearings. And prosecutors continue to pursue new death penalty cases each year.

Whether you're for or against capital punishment, you should be outraged by what's happening. To please the tough-on-crime crowd, we keep the death penalty. But to appease progressives, or to assuage our own conscience, nobody actually gets killed.

"Clearly, in terms of quick justice, it's a system that's not working," says Judge Michael McShane, who presides over capital murder trials in Multnomah County Circuit Court.

Yet for the most part, this shameful situation stays hidden. Death row is tucked away on the third floor of a building deep inside the Oregon State Penitentiary. The rarely used execution chamber is behind locked doors in the same prison. And no executions means no front-page headlines.

"A lot of people aren't even aware that we have a death penalty here," says Rachel Hardesty, a Portland State University criminal justice professor who has spent a decade studying capital punishment in Oregon.

At the same time as Oregon dithers over literally a life-or-death decision, the rest of the country is undergoing a radical rethinking of capital punishment.

New Jersey repealed its death penalty system last year after racking up an Oregon-esque record of zero executions in 26 years. The legislatures in Montana and Nebraska last year tried but narrowly failed to do the same. Even Uzbekistan is ahead of Oregon--the Central Asian autocracy repealed its death penalty last year.

Meanwhile, 2007 saw the lowest number of executions nationwide after the U.S. Supreme Court put executions on hold last September while it hears a case on whether the 3 drugs used in lethal injections cause unnecessary suffering.

But Oregon remains stuck with a backward system in which the state has the power to kill criminals yet refuses to do so--offending just about everyone who cares about the issue either way.

Irene James supports the death penalty but calls Oregon's system "senseless." A 78-year-old retired schoolteacher from Tualatin, she has endured 113 days in court since her 26-year-old daughter was murdered in 1987, watching serial killer Dayton Leroy Rogers get re-sentenced twice on appeals. And his case remains years from being resolved.

Authorities dubbed Rogers the "Molalla Forest Killer" during the 1980s for torturing James' daughter Maureen and at least 7 other women to death--occasionally sawing off their feet before killing them to satisfy a fetish, then scattering their bodies in the woods of Clackamas County.

"It's not easy," James says of the endless court appearances. "I'm really resentful about the way it works. I'm resentful, because he keeps coming back."

High-profile supporters of the death penalty share her frustration, saying the system takes far too long. "What we have right now is unacceptable, no doubt about that," says Kevin Mannix, a former Republican gubernatorial candidate who ran in 2002 on a law-and-order mantra.

Even though we don't execute people, Frink considers capital punishment a valuable tool for prosecutors. The threat of death, he says, leads defendants to enter plea deals for life without parole or life with a minimum of 30 years--the 2 other penalties, besides death, that Oregon allows for aggravated murder.

Fiscal watchdogs, however, say death penalty cases waste millions each year in public-safety money. Common sense says it's cheaper to kill someone than keep him in prison for life. But since Oregon keeps convicts on death row for decades--essentially paying for a life sentence anyway--we spend millions on attorney fees moving their cases through a rigorous first trial and long appeals process that are unique to death penalty cases.

"The typical guy on the street thinks the death penalty is cheap because you flip the switch and walk away," says Richard Dieter, head of the Death Penalty Information Center in Washington, D.C. "They don't count the 20 years it takes to get there."

Nationwide, experts say capital cases are 20 times more expensive to prosecute because of the length of appeals. Oregon officials don't make guesses about how much it will cost here, because after 24 years of letting juries sentence killers to death, not a single case has yet gone all the way through the appeals system.

But Bill Long, a Willamette University law professor and death penalty opponent who wrote the only book on capital punishment in Oregon, has estimated Oregon's oldest cases could end up costing more than $10 million per defendant (the national average for capital cases is around $3 million). Hardesty estimated in 2005 that Oregon and its counties spend at least $9 million a year pursuing death penalty cases.

Officials in Salem project the state government will spend more than $1 million on attorney fees prosecuting and defending each death penalty case. That includes the cost of defense investigators, but not county prosecutors or local police. It also doesn't include several levels of appeals. That estimated $1.02 million alone--only a fraction of the total cost--is the same as the price of keeping a convict in prison for 36 years at the current cost of incarceration.

Added up for all 35 capital-punishment cases, that totals $35.7 million in public-safety money. The money is more than what's budgeted to run the forensics division at the cash-strapped Oregon State Police in 2007-09 ($32.2 million), and nearly enough to fund OSP's entire criminal investigation division for the same period ($40.2 million).

Meanwhile, there are about 50 more defendants currently charged with death penalty crimes in Oregon, which will suck more than $50 million more out of the state budget if the defendants are sentenced to death. Despite the expense, they may never see execution. Nationwide, only 12 % of people who are sentenced to death are actually executed.

That leaves even death penalty proponents questioning whether the cost is worth it--people like Mannix, who now wonders if it's time to look at other alternatives.

"In this state, we need to ask ourselves if we are willing to plunge the syringe or flip the switch," he says. "You need to understand that the public has mixed emotions on this issue."

(source: Editorial, Willamette Week)
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Just a blah blah editorial but we never hear much about Oregon.


Granny B

That leaves even death penalty proponents questioning whether the cost is worth it--people like Mannix, who now wonders if it's time to look at other alternatives.



YOU WISH!!  ::) The only thing I question is your cowardice in getting the job done and finally giving justice to the victims!   :P
" Closure? Closure is a misused word in the English language.  There is no such thing as closure for the family of a murder victim.  There will never be any closure for the death of our loved ones until we are dead ourselves.  The families have a lifetime sentence of anguish and sadness." 
Susan Levy

AnneTheBelgian

http://www.kval.com/news/local/116497563.html

Friday, February 18, 2011 - Eugene, OR

Death Row: 5 from Lane County among 34 sentenced to die

By KVAL News

Story Published: Feb 18, 2011 at 1:36 PM PST

EUGENE, Ore. - If Angela McAnulty is sentenced to death and eventually executed, she would be the first woman executed in Oregon history.

She would not be the first woman on death row, however. Jeannace Freeman was 20 years old when she murdered her female lover's young son by throwing him off a bridge in Jefferson County, Ore. She was sentenced to die for the crime.

But Oregon voters repealed the death penalty Nov. 3, 1964. ON Nov. 5, then-Gov. Mark Hatfield commuted the death sentences of three people, including Freeman, to life in prison.

Oregon re-instated the death penalty in 1984 but didn't carry out the first execution in decades until 1996.

If sentenced to die, McAnulty would join 34 inmates already on death row in Salem awaiting execution or the outcome of appeals.

All 34 are men convicted of aggravated murder.

Five of the killers committed their crimes in Lane County.

Oregon hasn't carried out an execution since 1997 when the state lethally injected Harry Charles Moore of Salem for killing his half-sister and her ex-husband.












Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

AnneTheBelgian

http://www.greenfieldreporter.com/view/story/0d88ded2b0bc478bac309ed632269c30/OR--Death-Penalty/

Oregon state Senate panel to review bills calling for changes in capital punishment policies

* THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

* First Posted: April 04, 2011 - 7:00 am
   
* Last Updated: April 04, 2011 - 7:00 am

PORTLAND, Ore. -- An Oregon state Senate panel is set to review bills Monday that could significantly reshape capital punishment in the state.

Supporters and opponents agree the measures would result in fewer death penalty cases in Oregon.

None of the proposals go as far as a bill recently signed into law in Illinois that eliminated the death penalty there entirely.

Oregon Democratic state Sen. Floyd Prozanski, who chairs the Senate Judiciary Committee, says the time isn't right for a full repeal in Oregon.

The bills would create more barriers for prosecutors seeking to pursue the death penalty. One of the measures would move part of the cost of capital cases to county governments.

Oregon has 36 people on death row, but there have been no executions since 1997.















Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

Granny B



Oregon allows physician assisted suicide for people.  And that is okay, that people who have done nothing wrong are allowed to die.

But Katie bar the door if the state tries to execute an unrepentant murderer, or serial murderer who more than deserves his death.

And the liberals in the state want to abolish the death penalty for the worst of the worst.  That is really screwed up thinking.
" Closure? Closure is a misused word in the English language.  There is no such thing as closure for the family of a murder victim.  There will never be any closure for the death of our loved ones until we are dead ourselves.  The families have a lifetime sentence of anguish and sadness." 
Susan Levy

AnneTheBelgian

Here is an interesting link where you can find complete list of Oregon inmates currently on death row (with informations about them and photos) :


http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/index.ssf/oregon_death_row.html













Anne





"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

AnneTheBelgian

http://www.registerguard.com/web/newslocalnews/27074466-41/tiner-salmu-bearden-case-county.html.csp

Judge overturns man's death sentence

By Karen McCowan

The Register-Guard

Published: (Tuesday, Oct 25, 2011 05:01AM) Today

A Portland judge has overturned Jeffrey Dale Tiner's May 2000 death sentence for the 1993 murder of Springfield resident James Salmu, saying Tiner wasn't given a proper defense.

Tiner's conviction for aggravated murder in the case still stands. But Multnomah County Circuit Senior Judge Frank Bearden has remanded the case back to Lane County Circuit Court for resentencing.

That will mean empaneling a new jury to rehear the sentencing phase of Tiner's case, Lane County Chief Deputy District Attorney Patty Perlow said Monday.

"It's discouraging that we have to try these cases again and again and again, but that's what we do in Ore­gon," Lane County District Attorney Alex Gardner said. "It's very time-consuming, and it's very expensive."

Verdicts and sentences are often overturned over "what the public at large sees as legal technicalities," he said.

Bearden noted in his ruling, however, that "the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has stated that there is no more important hearing in law or equity than the penalty phase of a capital trial."

In a seven-page opinion, Bearden wrote that Tiner's due process rights were violated when his defense lawyers failed to call two witnesses at sentencing who were available to "portray a more human and less dangerous side" of the convicted killer.

Defense attorneys Marc Friedman and Clayton Lance also failed to properly counsel Tiner about his allocution, a statement defendants make directly to a jury without subjecting themselves to cross-examination, Bearden found.

It is likely that "at least one juror would not have voted to impose the death penalty," the judge wrote, if Tiner's sister had testified about his childhood abuse, if a Nevada prison warden had testified that Tiner was trusted to use knives in a prison kitchen, and if Tiner had made a different allocution."

Tiner will remain on Oregon's death row pending results of the resentencing, according to Jacob Humphries of the state Department of Corrections.

Tiner, now 53, was convicted of killing Salmu in March of 1993, then burying his body in the woods 52 miles east of Springfield. Salmu, who died at 34, was missing for more than a year and a half before a mushroom hunter found his skele­tal remains. He had been beaten, stabbed and shot, according to evidence in the case.

Karlyn Eklof was also convicted of aggravated murder in the case. She is serving two life prison terms.

Trial evidence indicated that Salmu, a mild-mannered boat builder, had taken Eklof and her three children into his home three months before the murder because they had no place to live. In mid-March, Eklof met Tiner, then newly paroled from a California prison, and invited him to Salmu's Springfield home for "a vacation," Tiner told police.

Prosecutors alleged that Eklof and Tiner attacked Salmu a week later during an argument over their request that he leave his own home so they could be alone. After Tiner killed the 34-year-old Salmu, witnesses testified, he and Eklof replaced carpeting in Salmu's living room and repainted a bathroom. But police found blood on a bathroom door and molding that was later matched to Salmu.

Though Tiner was indicted for the murder in 1995, his trial was delayed for nearly five years while the Oregon Court of Appeals considered his pretrial legal claims.

Bearden, who retired in 2008 after 30 years on the bench, was assigned by the Marion County Circuit Court to rule on Tiner's motion for post-conviction relief based on his claim of incompetent counsel. That case was filed in Marion County because that court encompasses the Oregon State Penitentiary, where Tiner is being held.

Salmu's mother and brother, Theresa Trudo and David Salmu, both of Fresno, said they were surprised Monday to learn of Bearden's ruling. They declined further comment.

In his ruling, Bearden noted that Tiner went through three defense lawyers before Lance and Friedman were appointed to handle his case, and that all the attorneys appeared to have trouble working with Tiner.

Bearden rejected Tiner's assertion that his conviction should also be overturned, ruling that Lance and Friedman conducted that portion of the trail within "the standard of professional skill and judgment required, given the barriers put up by" Tiner.

Neither Lance nor Friedman responded Monday to an invitation to comment on Bearden's decision.








Other links : 1. http://off2dr.com/smf/index.php?topic=6339.msg43827#msg43827

                    2. http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/index.ssf/oregon_death_row.html











Photo : The murderer Jeffrey Dale Tiner >:(












Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

Amanda

Oregon governor says he won't allow any more executions

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/sns-rt-us-oregon-executionstre7al2r1-20111122,0,7486127.story

Tuesday November 22, 2011

PORTLAND, Ore (Reuters) - Oregon's Democratic Governor John Kitzhaber said on Tuesday he would allow no more executions in the state on his watch because he believed the death penalty was "morally wrong."

The move, by a man who is also a former emergency room physician, effectively halts the planned execution of convicted killer Gary Haugen, who was scheduled to die by lethal injection on December 6.

"It is time for Oregon to consider a different approach," Kitzhaber said in a statement. "I refuse to be a part of this compromised and inequitable system any longer; and I will not allow further executions while I am governor."

The move marks the latest salvo in a long-running battle over the death penalty in America, where support for capital punishment has long been viewed as a benchmark of toughness for politicians running for office.

Sixteen states and the District of Columbia have no death penalty, and there has been a gradual trend away from capital punishment in the country with the number of executions falling slightly in recent years. Illinois' governor signed a law abolishing the death penalty earlier this year.

Kitzhaber, who announced the move a day after the state's Supreme Court cleared the way for Haugen's execution, said Oregon had carried out two executions in the last 49 years, both during his first administration as governor.

He said he allowed the executions to go forward in 1996 and 1997 because he was torn between a personal opposition to the death penalty and his oath to uphold the Oregon constitution.

"They were the most agonizing and difficult decisions I have made as governor and I have revisited and questioned them over and over again over the past 14 years," Kitzhaber said.

"I do not believe that those executions made us safer and certainly they did not make us nobler as a society," he said. "And I simply cannot participate once again in something I believe to be morally wrong."

Greg Horner, Clackamas County chief deputy district attorney, said he disagreed with Kitzhaber's decision.

"I have not heard any legitimate complaints about the system except that it is way too slow. And the answer is not to scrap the system," Horner said.

Steve Doell, president of Crime Victims United of Oregon, called the move a "slap in the face of the will of the Oregon voter" because the death penalty was reinstated in the state in 1984 by a ballot initiative.

"Here we have a governor that says 'I know better than you,'" Doell said.

But Ron Steiner, chairman of the board of directors for Oregonians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty, said Kitzhaber had done the right thing.

"We're very pleased there will be a full and open discussion about the death penalty and all the issues around it," he said.

Kitzhaber said that despite his decision to disallow further executions, he had not commuted the sentences of Haugen or the other 36 inmates on Oregon's death row because the state's law on capital punishment was not his alone to decide.

But the governor, who was elected to a nonconsecutive third four-year term last year and took office in January, said he hoped his action would prompt a "long overdue reevaluation" of state policy.

Haugen, whose imminent execution appeared to be the impetus for Kitzhaber's move, was convicted of killing his girlfriend's mother in 1981.

He and another prisoner were both later convicted of murder for the 2003 killing of another inmate while Haugen was in prison for the first murder. The slain inmate sustained 84 stab wounds and blunt-force trauma to the head, court records show.

There have been 43 executions so far this year in the United States compared with 46 in all of 2010.

~
Oh, Oregon...  ::)

leopard32

What an absolute disgrace this man is! As governor, it is Kitzhaber's duty to uphold the constitution and the law.  If he doesn't like making tough decisions he should resign.  Instead he rides roughshod over the democratic will of the majority and over justice.
It is hardly as if there were doubts about Haugen's guilt. This is the typical behavior of the Liberal Left.  It is interesting that he calls himself a democrat whilst totally denying democracy when he doesn't like the outcome.


AnneTheBelgian

Other article :



http://www.argusobserver.com/articles/2011/11/23/news/doc4ecd38fabd43c439074390.txt

Oregon governor bans death penalty for rest of his term

JONATHAN J. COOPER

Associated Press

Wednesday, November 23, 2011 10:25 AM PST

SALEM -- Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber on Tuesday imposed a moratorium on the death penalty for the remainder of his term, saying he's morally opposed to capital punishment and has long regretted allowing two men to be executed in the 1990s.

Kitzhaber's decision gives a temporary reprieve to a twice-convicted murderer who was scheduled to die by lethal injection in two weeks, along with 36 others on death row. It makes Oregon the fifth state to halt executions since 2007.

The Democratic governor said he has repeatedly questioned and revisited his decisions to allow convicted murderers Douglas Wright and Harry Moore to be executed in 1996 and 1997.

"I do not believe that those executions made us safer, and certainly they did not make us nobler as a society," Kitzhaber said. "And I simply cannot participate once again in something I believe to be morally wrong."

Kitzhaber is a former emergency room doctor who still retains an active physician license with the Oregon Medical Board, and his opposition to the death penalty has been well-known. He was elected last year to an unprecedented third term as governor after eight years away from public office.

Oregon has a complex history with capital punishment. Voters have outlawed it twice and legalized it twice, and the state Supreme Court struck it down once. Voters most-recently legalized the death penalty on a 56-44 vote in 1984. Since then, two men have been executed, both of whom voluntarily gave up their appeals during Kitzhaber's first administration.

Prison officials had been preparing for the Dec. 6 execution of Gary Haugen, who also had waived appeals. Haugen was serving a life sentence for fatally bludgeoning his former girlfriend's mother when he was sentenced to death for the 2003 killing of a fellow inmate, who had 84 stab wounds and a crushed skull.

Kitzhaber said he has no sympathy or compassion for murderers, but Oregon's death penalty scheme is "an expensive and unworkable system that fails to meet basic standards of justice."

Over a three-decade political career, Kitzhaber has built a reputation for charting his own course, sometimes to the frustration of fellow Democrats and others to the chagrin of legislative Republicans.

Kitzhaber's moratorium means Oregon joins, at least temporarily, four other states that have halted executions, according to the Death Penalty Information Center. Illinois this year outlawed the death penalty after the discovery of wrongful convictions.

New Mexico voters abolished it in 2009, two years after New Jersey's Legislature and governor did the same. A New York appeals court struck down a portion of the death penalty statute.

Prison officials said last week that they'd spent $42,000 preparing for Haugen's execution, not including legal fees, including $18,000 spent on lethal drugs.

Prosecutors have long complained that death penalty cases take decades to make their way through the courts, but efforts to change the law have been stymied in the Legislature. Eight condemned inmates have been on death row since the 1980s.

"I do not believe for a moment that the voters intended to create a system in which those condemned to death could determine whether that sentence would be carried out," Kitzhaber said.

Oregon's constitution gives Kitzhaber authority to commute the sentences of all death row inmates, but he said he will not to do so because the policy on capital punishment is a matter for all Oregonians to decide.

Kitzhaber's term ends in January 2015. He has not said whether he'll run for re-election.















>:( :-\

















Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

JTiscool

How does he suppose he can punish Gary now? He was servivg life with no parole when he killed another inmate.

Death sentences don't keep us safe my  :-\
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

AnneTheBelgian

http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/opinionla/la-ed-death-20111125,0,1615486.story

Editorial

Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber leads with his conscience

In ordering a moratorium on executions for the duration of his term, he showed courage and was true to his convictions.

November 25, 2011
Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber angered prosecutors, victims' families and doubtless many voters this week when he granted a reprieve to all 37 of the state's death row inmates for the duration of his term. In doing so, he committed one of the most courageous and conscientious acts we've seen on the national political stage in some time.

Kitzhaber made his announcement following a decision by the state Supreme Court clearing the way for the Dec. 6 execution of Gary Haugen, who was convicted of killing Mary Archer in 1981 and stabbing a fellow prison inmate to death in 2004. The governor's reprieve disgusted Archer's first husband, Ard Pratt, who told the Associated Press: "It was almost over. And then [Kitzhaber] changes it because he's a coward and doesn't want to do it."

To the contrary, siding with his conscience on a politically unpopular decision (Oregon voters reinstated the death penalty in 1984) took a good deal of courage. Kitzhaber, a former physician, said he'd taken an oath to do no harm and could no longer justify a sentence that is morally wrong and unfairly applied.

Also unhappy with the governor is Josh Marquis, an Oregon district attorney and death penalty proponent. He criticized Kitzhaber for "his outrageous decision to apparently substitute his personal moral opinion for that of the will of the voters and the courts." Kitzhaber did no such thing, though he could have. Under Oregon's Constitution, he is empowered to commute the sentences of everybody on death row, but he left that determination to the voters. Haugen's sentence still stands; he simply won't be executed as long as Kitzhaber is in office (his term expires in 2015). This is the kind of decision voters elected Kitzhaber to make.

Even Haugen isn't too thrilled with Kitzhaber. The inmate voluntarily ended his appeals, just like the other two convicts executed in Oregon over the last 27 years, and was prepared to die. But that points up another problem with the way capital punishment is practiced in Oregon and many other states: It is a sort of assisted-suicide program in which appeals are endless and the only people actually executed are the ones who want to be. Is that justice?

California Gov. Jerry Brown opposes capital punishment, but he says he'll enforce it because that's what voters want. It's a pity he lacks the courage of his convictions, unlike his colleague to the north.















Photo : Governor John Kitzhaber >:(






















Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

JTiscool

Courage is fulfilling your promise to your people and that is what Jerry Brown his attempting to do.

You made a promise to those who voted for you and if you go against your word, you are.a coward.

Whoever typed that up is thicker than steel.
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

AnneTheBelgian

http://www.oregonlive.com/health/index.ssf/2012/01/oregons_unused_death_penalty_d.html

Oregon's unused death penalty drugs test pharmaceutical company leaders

Published: Tuesday, January 17, 2012, 5:50 AM     

Updated: Tuesday, January 17, 2012, 5:52 AM

By Joe Rojas-Burke, The Oregonian

Oregon's unused lethal injection drugs have set the stage for a test of the sincerity of pharmaceutical executives who say they don't want their products used to execute prisoners.

Since Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber cancelled the planned Dec. 6 execution of convicted murderer Gary Haugen, the state has returned the lethal injection drugs to an undisclosed wholesaler. Oregon had obtained 20 50-milliliter vials of pentobarbital; 50 10-milliliter vials of pancuronium and 50 20-milliliter vials of potassium chloride. The supply cost nearly $18,000 and Oregon expects to get much of the money back.

Two companies, Hospira Inc. and the Danish firm Lundbeck, are on the spot because they supplied the drugs in the first place, argues Ford Vox, a Boston physician and medical journalist, in an editorial in The Guardian:

    Hospira CEO Michael Ball, ... sends letters to death penalty states letting them know how much he frowns on their misuse of his products...Until public policy changes on capital punishment, there's little Hospira can or will do, beyond those stern letters, to prevent misuse of Hospira drugs in executions - since, he wrote, Hospira is not willing to restrict distribution of pancuronium bromide and other drugs that have legitimate medical uses.

    But now Michael Ball has a good chance to do more than kick off another of his letter-writing campaigns. I believe Hospira and Lundbeck both know they've got at least one wholesaler who's getting a rogue return. Hospira claims it can't control the wholesalers, but it does have leverage in this case: it's time both firms step up and refuse to participate in further business with that wholesaler - or admit their own complicity.


Executions by lethal injection are supposed to be quick, painless and more humane than the gas chamber or gallows. But the killing method remains controversial. Medical experts say poor understanding of the drugs' effects and executioners' lack of medical training has led to botched cases and a likelihood of extreme suffering in some instances, we reported:

    "A firing squad probably causes less pain and suffering," says Dr. Jonathan Groner, a pediatric surgeon in Columbus, Ohio, and outspoken critic of medicalized executions. "Lethal injection looks like outpatient surgery, so people are willing to allow it."


Most physician and nursing organizations have come out strongly against medically assisted executions. American Medical Association guidelines prohibit almost every type of involvement: Physicians should not attend or observe executions, give technical advice, select injection sites, start intravenous lines, prescribe or prepare the drugs or inspect or test lethal injection devices. Last year, the American Board of Anesthesiology decided that involvement in lethal injection is grounds to revoke an anesthesiologist's board certification.

Physicians and influential medical journals have begun pressuring pharmaceutical companies that supply lethal injection drugs to the 34 U.S. states that impose death penalty sentences.

Both Hospira and Lundbeck have taken some steps to prevent U.S. prison authorities from obtaining drugs for lethal injections. Until 2011, Oregon and other death-penalty states used the anesthetic sodium thiopental. But in January, Illinois-based Hospira stopped selling the drug. When states began ordering thiopental from a British company, the UK government banned its export to prevent its use in U.S. lethal injections. American states then began buying and using another anesthetic, pentobarbital made by Lundbeck. Lundbeck took steps in July 2011 to block distribution to prisons in death penalty states. (By then, Oregon had already purchased its supply.)

Pancuronium, a paralyzing agent, is particularly controversial because it can make people look serene even if they are in pain. Hospira is the sole supplier of pancuronium. The Lancet, an influential medical journal in the UK, recenty published an open letter signed by 25 physicians urging Hospira to do more to stop prison executioners from obtaining it:

    To date, Hospira has refused to comment on what, if any, action it will take to stop the abuse of this drug. Pancuronium is an extremely effective muscle relaxant when used in an appropriate hospital setting, but when used for executions, there is the very real possibility of causing extreme pain and suffering in a paralysed prisoner. No responsible pharmaceutical company should have anything to do with executions. As your own code of business conduct states, Hospira has an "ethical compass" to "accept the responsibility of being an ethical global citizen". It is time for Hospira to live up to those fine words, without affecting patients' care, by putting in place a restricted distribution system for pancuronium.


Hospira CEO F. Michael Ball, responding in the same journal, said restricting distribution could jeopardise access for patients "who are deserving of appropriate access to medical products." He argued that efforts to change U.S. policy on capital punishment "are best directed at legislators who have the authority and ability to establish policy."
































Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

Angelstorms OL'Man

From what  I understand some place in New York has  the drugs  as of last week.
This was designed to hurt....Its a SEAL Candace unless you have been there yo will never understand...

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