New York Senate passes Death Penalty Legislation

Started by ScoopD (aka: Pam), July 17, 2007, 03:37:05 PM

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ScoopD (aka: Pam)

Albany - In response to last week's shooting in Brooklyn that led to the death of one New York City Police officer and serious injury to another, the State Senate Monday passed legislation to establish the death penalty for criminals who kill police officers.

The legislation, which originally passed the Senate in May, would establish the death penalty for the intentional murder of a police officer, peace officer or an employee of the Department of Correctional Services.

The legislation also addresses the concerns with respect to the murder of a police officer, peace officer, or correctional officer by mandating the sentence of life without parole if the jury is deadlocked and unable to agree on the death penalty sentence.

The bill was sent to the Assembly.

source: http://www.empirestatenews.net/News/10070717-1.html
<br /><br />If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. -Thomas Paine<br /><br />My reason for supporting capital punishment: My cousin 16 yr. old Amanda Greenwell was murdered in March of 2004 at the hands of serial killer Jeremy Bryan Jones.

ScoopD (aka: Pam)

Can someone help me understand the above a little better.  New York has had a moratorium on executions since June of 2004 and has commutted all death row inmates to life since then. So where does this new legislation bring us? It only mentions cops. I thought there was something wrong with Jury instructions or something with NY law and that is why the moratorium. Help me out here understanding what this now means?

This is what took place in 2004:    A New York Court of Appeals decision that effectively invalidates the state's death penalty. In a 4-3 decision, the court ruled that the "deadlock" instruction given to juries improperly coerces them to vote for the death penalty.
<br /><br />If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. -Thomas Paine<br /><br />My reason for supporting capital punishment: My cousin 16 yr. old Amanda Greenwell was murdered in March of 2004 at the hands of serial killer Jeremy Bryan Jones.

pizzpoor

Its a moot point anyway Pam. You dont have the illusion that a liberal state like NY would seriously consider executing anybody whatever the crime, do you?  If they had caught the 911 terrorists alive after the attack, they wouldnt have executed them either.

ScoopD (aka: Pam)

Very true Pizz...    There's a man in an upstate prison now who was given the death penalty and had his sentence commutted in 2004 who should actually be executed! Colin Ferguson, the Long Island Railroad killer..   I remember the day he committed his crime, he should have been executed long ago.   I live in a pansey state...  thank god I'm leaving!
<br /><br />If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. -Thomas Paine<br /><br />My reason for supporting capital punishment: My cousin 16 yr. old Amanda Greenwell was murdered in March of 2004 at the hands of serial killer Jeremy Bryan Jones.

James

Sounds like they are talking out their ass!
You Talking To Me!!!!!!!!

Granny B

It is well known that if someone is not afraid of a police officer, attacks or kills a police officer, then they are real threat to society.  So it makes sense to have the death penalty for someone who would kill a police officer.

BUT......what about Joe Blow, his wife and kids??  Don't they deserve the same protection as a police officer under the law ???  The law they passed in NY is unfair and unjust.  All citizens should have the same or equal protection under the law of the United States.  I can see appeals coming on this issue.
" Closure? Closure is a misused word in the English language.  There is no such thing as closure for the family of a murder victim.  There will never be any closure for the death of our loved ones until we are dead ourselves.  The families have a lifetime sentence of anguish and sadness." 
Susan Levy

ScoopD (aka: Pam)

Grandma, I don't think this will affect any appeals if someone is sentenced to death under this new law. Many states have the same thing on their law books. I do view this as a step forward for NY. We just sent someone to federal death row in February this year and there is an outcry now for the recent cop killer to be tried in federal court so that they can also be sentenced to death.  see: http://www.newsday.com/news/local/newyork/ny-nydeth17vr5296195jul17,0,4283038.story?coll=ny-nynews-print

As far as the average citizen goes I think the death penalty is already on the books here but not used until they resolved the jury instructions issues. I think they had figured that one out and it went in but didn't pass...    I would have to go back and do some research to be sure.
<br /><br />If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. -Thomas Paine<br /><br />My reason for supporting capital punishment: My cousin 16 yr. old Amanda Greenwell was murdered in March of 2004 at the hands of serial killer Jeremy Bryan Jones.

Booboo1962


Its a moot point anyway Pam. You dont have the illusion that a liberal state like NY would seriously consider executing anybody whatever the crime, do you?  If they had caught the 911 terrorists alive after the attack, they wouldnt have executed them either.


those terrorists would be federally charged.  the state of NY would not be the first on to hang them. they could file charges also, but uncle sam would have given them the shot.

Granny B

#8
July 18, 2007, 11:37:40 PM Last Edit: July 18, 2007, 11:40:29 PM by Grandmother of Brandon


Its a moot point anyway Pam. You dont have the illusion that a liberal state like NY would seriously consider executing anybody whatever the crime, do you?  If they had caught the 911 terrorists alive after the attack, they wouldnt have executed them either.


those terrorists would be federally charged.  the state of NY would not be the first on to hang them. they could file charges also, but uncle sam would have given them the shot.


I'm not so sure about that.  Look at the case of Terry Nichols and the OKC bombing.  He was as guilty as McVeigh was for helping to plot it, rent the truck, build the bomb, everything but go along to OKC that day. He only got life in prison.

The terrorists would also have gotten bogged down in the court system and some pansy assed jurors would have deadlocked on whether or not to give them a death sentence, because they were not directly involved in the actual downing of the planes and the buildings.  And we would have footed the bill for their defense in the millions of dollars it would have taken to prosecute them and turn them loose to kill again in their appeals process, had they actually been convicted.
" Closure? Closure is a misused word in the English language.  There is no such thing as closure for the family of a murder victim.  There will never be any closure for the death of our loved ones until we are dead ourselves.  The families have a lifetime sentence of anguish and sadness." 
Susan Levy

pizzpoor

The only sure thing about a capital case anywhere in the US is that NOTHING is a sure thing.

AnneTheBelgian

http://polhudson.lohudblogs.com/2011/03/16/ball-death-penalty-for-cop-killers/

(with video)

Ball: Death Penalty For Cop Killers

Posted by: Nick Reisman

on Mar 16, 2011

Sen. Greg Ball, R-Patterson, Putnam County, along with Brooklyn Republican Sen. Martin Golden, are backing a bill that would make the death penalty a possibility for those convicted of killing law enforcement officials.

The bill comes after the shooting deaths of Poughkeepsie Detective John Falcone and Police Officer Alain Schaberger of the NYPD.

The law, which has been batted around Albany over the years, would apply to those knowingly kill police officers, peace officers and Department of Correctional Services employees.

The death penalty was revived by Gov. George Pataki, a Republican, but it was declared unconstitutional in 2004.













Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

JTiscool

A step in the right direction imo.
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

Naviator

This is great news, it means another state in the North-East US that will have the DP but be too afraid to use it (Penn and CT come to mind)... I would say New Hampshire, but they just got into the game and need time.  I would also say Maryland, but I don't know if that would be north-east or just Eastern US...

Rick4404


Can someone help me understand the above a little better.  New York has had a moratorium on executions since June of 2004 and has commutted all death row inmates to life since then. So where does this new legislation bring us? It only mentions cops. I thought there was something wrong with Jury instructions or something with NY law and that is why the moratorium. Help me out here understanding what this now means?

This is what took place in 2004:    A New York Court of Appeals decision that effectively invalidates the state's death penalty. In a 4-3 decision, the court ruled that the "deadlock" instruction given to juries improperly coerces them to vote for the death penalty.

It's not likely that New York State will anytime soon reinstate the death penalty.  At least under a Democratic governor and Democratic-controlled Legislature. 

Two other states along the East Coast have abolished the death penalty as a possible punishment in all new cases.  Those being Connecticut and Maryland.  Although both in Connecticut and Maryland, the repeal was not retroactive concerning the prisoners currently on death row.  It means their sentences will eventually be carried out, unless their sentences are commuted before then.

Rick4404

#14
April 29, 2017, 09:05:14 PM Last Edit: April 29, 2017, 09:09:44 PM by Rick4404
Here we are, almost ten years later, and the needle hasn't moved an inch on reinstating the death penalty in the Empire State.

New York last executed a condemned prisoner, a murderer by the name of Eddie Lee Mays in 1963 in the electric chair at the Sing Sing State Prison in a picturesque location in upstate Ossining, N.Y., which is north of the New York City metropolitan​ area, along the Hudson River. That's where the term, "They'll send him up the river for that!" comes from.

The state's electric chair and it's related electrical apparatuses were removed from Sing Sing by the state Department of Corrections, and they sit unused in another New York State prison, the Green Haven Correctional Center.

Accordingly, it isn't very likely that a bill to reinstate the death penalty in New York State will pass anytime soon.

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