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Started by Mildred, August 04, 2011, 05:29:12 PM

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Mildred

Robert t. Simon Jr.
Was sentenced in Quitman County in July 1990 for the Feb. 2, 1990, murders of the four-member Carl Parker family. Fellow death row inmate Anthony Carr was an accomplice.


THe victims of this SCUM were my bosses family. Im bout to go google and see what I can find but last she heard, he claimed he fell and hit his head and doesnt remember the crime so he got a stay of execution.  Can anyone find out if anything else has happened since?  This all happened this past year

AnneTheBelgian

Dear Administrator, Dear Cynthia,


Here, you will find this link (the thread who concerns Simon)


http://off2dr.com/smf/index.php?topic=12120.msg91462#msg91462




I am sorry (and I think that I am not alone here) for this sad case and for the victims !

I hope that this POS will have a new date of execution. He deserves it !







Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

Granny B

Robert Simon Jr. - Mississippi - Stayed



Summary of Offense:

Was sentenced in Quitman County in July 1990 for the February 2, 1990 murders of Carl and Bobbie Joe Parker, and their children, Charlotte and Gregory Parker. Fellow death row inmate Anthony Carr was an accomplice.

Simon was granted a COA for ineffective assistance of counsel in the 9/9/09 5th Circuit orders/opinions.

Opinion is here:

http://www.ca5.uscourts.gov/opinions...0011.0.wpd.pdf

Article 9/10/09


Federal appeals court to hear Miss. death row inmate's ineffective lawyer claim


A federal appeals court has agreed to hear condemned inmate Robert Simon Jr.'s claim that he could have avoided a death sentence had his sentencing jury been told of his abusive childhood.

A three-judge panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans on Wednesday said Simon's claim that his attorney could have done a better job deserved airing. A federal judge in Mississippi had dismissed the claim in 2008.

Simon was sentenced to death for the killings of Carl Parker, his wife, Bobbie Jo, and their son Gregory, 12, on Feb. 2, 1990. The killings occurred a few hours after the family had returned to their rural Quitman County home from church services.

Simon was denied a COA by the 5th Circuit in their 9/7/10 orders/opinions.

Opinion is here:

http://www.ca5.uscourts.gov/opinions...0011.1.wpd.pdf

Article 9/8/10


5th Circuit denies appeal in Quitman Co. murders


JACKSON, Miss. (AP) -- A federal appeals court panel has denied condemned inmate Robert Simon Jr.'s claim that he could have avoided a death sentence had his sentencing jury been told of his abusive childhood.

A federal judge in Mississippi had dismissed Simon's ineffective counsel claims in 2008. A panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld that decision on Tuesday.

Simon was sentenced to death for the killings of Carl Parker, his wife, Bobbie Jo, and their son Gregory, 12, on Feb. 2, 1990. The killings occurred a few hours after the family had returned to their rural Quitman County home from church services.

He also was sentenced to life in prison for the killing of Charlotte Parker, 9, the slain couple's daughter.

The Mississippi Supreme Court upheld Simon's conviction and in 2004 denied Simon's arguments that he had found evidence to justify a new trial.

Authorities said the bodies of the Parker family were pulled from their burning house. All four had been shot, but an autopsy showed Charlotte died from smoke inhalation.

Carl Parker's truck was found in Clarksdale. After an investigation, Simon and Anthony Carr were arrested in Clarksdale. Carr was convicted on four counts of capital murder and sentenced to die.

U.S. District Judge W. Allen Pepper denied Simon's request for a certificate of appealability in 2008. A certificate of appealability is similar to a post-conviction petition, in which an inmate argues he has found new evidence -- or a possible constitutional issue -- that could persuade a court to order a new trial.

Simon argued that had his attorney looked into his background, he would have found a history of abuse at the hands of Simon's father. Simon claimed his counsel's failure to uncover this history of abuse resulted in a weak challenge to the prosecution's case for a death sentence.

The Mississippi Supreme Court ruled Simon's attorney couldn't investigate something that Simon hadn't told him about. The Mississippi court also held that even if the sentencing jury had been told about the abuse it would still have likely returned a death penalty.

The 5th Circuit panel on Tuesday said it agreed with the ruling by the Mississippi court.

The panel said prosecutors' case in support of the death penalty was very strong, and the evidence of Simon's childhood abuse would not have swayed a jury.

http://www.greenwichtime.com/default...ers-649272.php

    US high court won't hear appeal in Miss. murders

    The U.S. Supreme Court has declined to hear an appeal from Mississippi death row inmate Robert Simon Jr., who claims he could have avoided a death sentence had his sentencing jury been told of his abusive childhood.

    A federal judge in Mississippi dismissed Simon's ineffective counsel claims in 2008. The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld that decision last fall.

    Simon was sentenced to death for the killings of Carl Parker, his wife, Bobbie Jo, and their 12-year-old son, Gregory, on Feb. 2, 1990. The killings occurred a few hours after the family had returned to their rural Quitman County home from church services.

    He also was sentenced to life in prison for the killing of Charlotte Parker, the slain couple's daughter 9-year-old daughter.

    http://www.wtva.com/news/local/story...1fPRt05Iw.cspx

Miss. AG Wants April 20 Execution For Simon

An execution date has been requested for a death row inmate convicted of killing a Quitman County family, Attorney General Jim Hood said.

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear an appeal from Robert Simon, who claimed he could have avoided a death sentence had his sentencing jury been told of his abusive childhood.

Lawyers with the Attorney General's Office filed a request with the Mississippi Supreme Court Monday afternoon requesting that an execution date of April 20 be set.

Simon was sentenced to death for the killings of Carl Parker, his wife, Bobbie Jo, and their 12-year-old son, Gregory, on Feb. 2, 1990. The killings occurred a few hours after the family had returned to their rural Quitman County home from church services.

He also was sentenced to life in prison for the killing of Charlotte Parker, the slain couple's daughter 9-year-old daughter.

State law requires an execution to be set 30 days from the date of the last order.

Hood said the state will likely switch to a new drug for lethal injections as officials around the country search for ways to deal with a shortage of one of the most common drugs used in executions.

"We most likely will be using another lethal drug called pentobarbital,which is already being used in some other states," Hood said.

Texas and Oklahoma recently announced the switch to pentobarbital, and plan to use it along with 2 other drugs. Ohio became the 1st state to use pentobarbital alone when it executed an inmate with the drug March 10.

(source: WAPT News)

    Lawyer Tries to Stop Execution

    A lawyer for death row inmate, Robert Simon, Jr., claims the prisoner hit his head in prison and is now incompetent for execution.

    Attorney T.H. Freeland, IV, made the argument in court records filed April 1 with the Mississippi Supreme Court that death row inmate, Robert Simon, Jr., is no longer competent for execution.

    The filing came in response to Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood's request for an April 20 execution date.

    Freeland doesn't describe how Simon hit his head, but said Simon can't understand his case and has trouble carrying on conversations.

    Simon was sentenced to death for the killings of Carl Parker, his wife, Bobbie Jo, and their son, Gregory, on Feb. 2, 1990. He was sentenced to life in prison for the killing of Charlotte Parker, the slain couple's 9-year-old daughter.

    http://www.wtok.com/home/headlines/L...119202474.html

Miss. court orders release of medical records

The Mississippi Supreme Court has ordered the release of medical records of death row inmate Robert Simon Jr. related to an alleged fall that defense attorneys contend has rendered Simon incompetent to be executed.

In an order Thursday, the court gave the Department of Corrections until Monday to provide records to the attorney general's office and the defense.

The attorney general had sought an April 20 execution date. The Supreme Court said it would not rule on any motions until the medical issue is resolved.

Simon's attorneys say Simon can't understand his case and has trouble carrying on conversations.

Simon was sentenced to death for the killings of three members of a Quitman County family. He got a life sentence in the death of a fourth family member.

Execution of multiple killer on hold

Death row inmate Robert Simon Jr. won't be executed April 20, as requested by the state attorney general's office.

On Thursday, the state Supreme Court granted the state's motion for access to Simon's medical records related to "any alleged fall and resulting blow to the head" that Simon's attorney said occurred at the prison.

The court gave the Department of Corrections until Monday to provide records to the attorney general's office and the defense.

The order further said, "The Court is holding in abeyance all other rulings and will accept no additional or supplemental filings regarding the motions pending before the Court after 5 p.m. April 21."

Simon's attorney, T.H. Freeland IV, filed a motion April 1 alleging Simon hit his head in prison and is incompetent for execution.

His motion was in response to Attorney General Jim Hood's request for the execution date.

Freeland doesn't describe how Simon hit his head, but said Simon can't understand his case and has trouble carrying on conversations.

Freeland wants the state Supreme Court to block the execution and send the case back to Quitman County judge for a hearing on Simon's competency.

Simon, 47, was sentenced to death for the killings of Carl Parker, his wife, Bobbie Jo, and their son, Gregory, on Feb. 2, 1990. He was sentenced to life in prison for the killing of Charlotte Parker, the slain couple's 9-year-old daughter. The killings occurred a few hours after the family had returned to their rural Quitman County home from church services.

Hood's office also has asked that the state be allowed to execute death row inmates Benny Joe Stevens on May 4 and Rodney Gray on April 27, after the U.S. Supreme Court had declined to hear their appeals.

The Mississippi Supreme Court has given attorneys for Stevens until Monday to file briefs opposing the setting of an execution date.

Stevens, 52, was sentenced to death in 1999 in the slayings of four people in the Foxworth community of Marion County.

Among those killed were Stevens' former wife and their 11-year-old son. Stevens' 16-year-old daughter was wounded and escaped from the mobile home.

Gray, 38, was sentenced to death in 1996 for killing an elderly woman in 1994.

Grace Blackwell, 79, was last seen in her car, withdrawing money from a bank. Her body was found later that day at the end of a bridge in Newton County. She had been shot several times. Her billfold, checkbook and the contents of her purse were found nearby, and her car was later found behind a service station in Decatur.

http://www.clarionledger.com/article...text|FRONTPAGE

    Mississippi death row inmates: MDOC failed to publicize lethal new drug

    Attorneys for three death row inmates, including a man who is scheduled to be executed May 10, contend the Mississippi Department of Corrections failed to properly publicize as required by law its switch to a new lethal injection drug.

    Benny Joe Stevens, Rodney Gray and Robert Simon Jr. said in documents filed Tuesday with the Mississippi Supreme Court that MDOC failed to follow the Administrative Procedures Act. Stevens is set to be executed May 10.

    The 2003 law requires state agencies to notify the public of proposed rule and regulation changes. The law gives citizens the right to offer opinions on proposed changes to rules and regulations, ask for hearings and request official opinions from state agencies.

    The inmates contend they cannot be executed because MDOC never published the change in its regulations covering executions as required by law.

    Gray is scheduled to be executed May 17. A motion to set an execution date for Simon is pending before the state Supreme Court while it awaits a determination on whether a fall has rendered Simon incompetent for execution.

    MDOC officials said in April they would switch to a different drug, pentobarbital, for the state's next execution due to a nationwide shortage of one drug it has used in the past.

    Jackson attorney David Neil McCarty, who represents the inmates, said in the motion that Stevens and the others were not challenging the MDOC's decision to use a different drug but its failure to notify the public through the Administrative Procedures Act. McCarty said that until MDOC does so, it cannot perform any executions.

    Last month, a Hinds County judge dismissed a similar complaint, ruling that the MDOC's execution procedures are exempt from the Administrative Procedures Act.

    Attorney General Jim Hood said Wednesday the issue had already been decided by the circuit court and he did not anticipate the defense attorneys having success before the state Supreme Court.

    Mississippi has used a three-drug mixture for its lethal injections in the past, but one of those chemicals, an anesthetic called sodium thiopental, is in short supply.

    Sodium thiopental is one of the most common execution drugs used in the U.S., but the nationwide shortage has forced states to consider other options.

    South Carolina announced Tuesday it would use pentobarbital instead of sodium thiopental in an execution Friday after the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration seized the state's supply of sodium thiopental last month. The agency has taken the drug away from several states because of concerns that officials broke the law by buying doses from England, which banned the drug's export for executions.

    Also Tuesday, attorneys for Stevens asked the Mississippi court to block his execution.

    Glenn Swartzfager of the Mississippi Office of Post-Conviction Counsel said in the motion that Stevens' previous attorneys failed to represent him properly. He called their work "nothing more than a mockery" of justice.

    Hood said Wednesday that that argument had already been rejected by the federal courts and he didn't anticipate the Mississippi court would approve it.

    "This is one of those last minute filings that they often do." Hood said.

    Stevens was sentenced to death in 1999 in the slaying of four people in the Foxworth community of Marion County.

    Those killed were Stevens' former wife, Glenda Lee Reid; her husband, Wesley Lee Reid, 38; the Reids' 11-year-old son, Dylan; and Dylan's friend, 10-year-old Heath Pounds.

    Gray was sentenced to death in 1996 for the 1994 rape and murder of 79-year-old Grace Blackwell of Louin.

    Simon was sentenced to death for the killings of Carl Parker, his wife, Bobbie Jo, and their son, Gregory, on Feb. 2, 1990. He was sentenced to life in prison for the killing of Charlotte Parker, the slain couple's 9-year-old daughter.

    http://www.clarionledger.com/article...ew-lethal-drug

    Simon to ask federal appeals court to stop Tuesday execution

    Death row inmate Robert Simon Jr. will ask a federal appeals court to stop his execution now scheduled for Tuesday at the state penitentiary at Parchman.

    Oxford attorney Tom Freeland says the notice of appeal has been filed with the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans. He declined to discuss on what grounds Simon will seek to stop his execution.

    Simon was sentenced to death for the 1990 killings of three members of a Quitman County family. He got a life sentence in the death of a fourth family member.

    Simon has been moved to a holding cell near the execution room at the prison. The penitentiary will be placed on lockdown Monday, the usual procedures the day before a scheduled execution.

    http://www.dailyjournal.net/view/sto...ppi-Execution/

    Killer's mom: 'He may be better off this way'

    Condemned man's mother says if son guilty, "he must have been on something"

    The State Penitentiary at Parchman is Robert Simon Jr.'s former workplace, his home for more than 20 years and the place where he is scheduled to die today.

    The prison lies less than 20 miles from the small farming community in Quitman County, where Simon murdered a family of four on Feb. 2, 1990.

    Simon - inmate No. 46380 - has been behind bars for more than two decades for killing Bubba, Bobbie Jo, Charlotte Jo and Gregory Parker.

    "I knew it was coming. I'm sorry about it, that I know," his mother, Rosie Simon, said last week about the scheduled execution. "I guess in some ways I tried to distance myself so it wouldn't hit so hard when it happens."

    Simon's accomplice, Anthony Carr, also sits on death row.


    The investigation led to Simon and Carr almost immediately after a neighbor reported seeing Bubba Parker's truck parked near Simon's mother-in-law's home in Clarksdale shortly after midnight.

    The evidence in the case continued to mount: The Parkers' stolen pickup had several stolen items and a loaded 20-gauge shotgun in it, Bubba and Bobbie Jo Parker's wedding rings were found at Simon's Memphis apartment, and Simon was wearing boots taken from the Parker residence when he was arrested.

    Still, Simon's mother holds on. If he committed the murders, she said, "he must have been on something."

    She admitted last week that it's been a while since she has talked to her son.

    She used to get letters from him, but they stopped coming around the time his attorney said he suffered a head injury - a point his attorneys have used in his latest round of appeals.

    "They say he's out of his mind," Rosie Simon said.

    According to court records, Simon, 47, suffered an apparent head injury on Jan. 7. His attorneys allege permanent brain damage occurred, but the courts have not agreed.

    In a last-ditch plea to stop the execution, Oxford attorney Tom Freeland filed documents Monday with the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans saying Mississippi courts have rejected the injury claims despite questions about Simon's mental competency.

    Freeland did not return calls for comment.

    Mississippi Department of Corrections Commissioner Chris Epps said the guards at Parchman say Simon is fine. He doesn't show signs of a long-term brain injury.

    "They say he's the same Robert Simon who's always been there," he said.

    Rosie Simon plans to visit him before the execution. She's anxious to see if he knows who she is because of his reported injury.

    "I just wish they could save him," Rosie Simon said. "Of course, he may be better off this way. I don't know."

    Epps said he was not aware of any family members other than Simon's mother who planned to visit him ahead of the execution.

    Simon has a daughter who lives in Texas. The Clarion-Ledger's attempts to reach her were not successful.

    Growing up, Simon was a quiet kid, his mother said.

    "He went to school and everything," she said. "You know how some kids fight? There was none of that. We didn't have no problems with him."

    According to court records, Simon's half brother, Jerry, said in an affidavit during sentencing that their father regularly beat them with a fan belt and it had an effect on Simon. He recalled instances when Simon would leave for days at a time.

    Another brother, Aaron, in another affidavit elaborated upon the beatings, calling them "really bad." The beatings left bruises and welts that bled.

    Simon attended Clarksdale High through the 11th grade. After that, he obtained his GED certificate and went on to serve in the military. Eventually, he went to work at Parchman as a guard.

    While in Parchman as an inmate, Simon has submitted requests with several groups that match prisoners with pen-pals. A common theme has been that he feels isolated because of his status as a former guard.

    "None of the other prisoners talk to me, and I will never get used to that type of loneliness," he wrote in one request. "I spend most of my time studying law, reading anything I can get my hands on and writing poems about my surroundings."

    Like any other death row inmate, Simon gets one hour outside five days a week.

    Another request from Simon said he spends time "working on my campaign to end the death penalty."

    "I write poems, draw, exercise, and meditate," he wrote. "I have so much to talk about with you and there's nothing you can talk about that will bore me."

    Epps said Simon has had 20 rule infractions since he entered Parchman in 1990.

    "That's not good," he said. "That means he's not orderly and he's not obedient."

    Some of the infractions have included cadillacing, or using a ropelike piece of fabric to attempt to get items outside his cell. He's also refused urine screenings several times, and he may have organized a fraudulent mail scheme - soliciting money from people under a different name, Epps said.

    Another violation came for assaulting someone.

    Jessica Quinn, a New York resident who has been corresponding with Simon for 13 years, said he has told her about some of his problems in prison.

    "They take him as a rabble-rouser," she said.

    She's suspicious of his injury and how he's been treated there.

    "The only thing I know is that he fell off of his top bunk - that's all they're saying about it," Quinn said.

    Death row inmates only have single beds in their cells.

    Despite the convictions and evidence to the contrary, Quinn said she doesn't believe Simon killed the Parker family.

    "An innocent man is going to be killed," she said of the scheduled execution.

    http://www.clarionledger.com/article...text|FRONTPAGE

    Heinous crime still haunts community

    For many people in this rural farming community, Feb. 2, 1990, will always be remembered as the day Quitman County was rocked with a crime of unspeakable horror - the cold-blooded murder of a well-known farm family.

    Carl "Bubba" Parker, 58, wife Bobbie Jo, 45, and their two children, 9-year-old Charlotte Jo and 12-year-old Gregory, left a church service in Clarksdale around 9 p.m. to return to their home on Mississippi 322.

    That was the last time anyone saw them alive. They were murdered in an apparent burglary gone awry - the bone-chilling details straight out of a horror film.

    After shooting each of them multiple times, raping the little girl and chopping the father's finger off to steal his wedding ring, the killers set the home on fire and left the bodies to burn.

    "It's the worst thing I can remember ever happening," said Bessie Sbravati, 78, a family friend who still lives down the street from the Parker property. "It was just horrible."

    Today, the state is scheduled to execute Robert Simon, 47, for the killings. His accomplice, Anthony Carr, 45, also is on death row.

    The Parker murders eerily mirror the killings of a Kansas farm family in 1959 - a crime made famous by Truman Capote's book In Cold Blood.

    In that case, two ex-cons broke into the Cutter family home in rural Holcomb and bound and fatally shot every one - father, mother and two children.

    The killers - men with no direct ties to the Cutters before targeting them for robbery - were executed in 1965, but the case has lived on through movies, true-crime novels and television dramas.

    Like the Cutter case, time hasn't washed away feelings about the Parker murders.

    Mention the Parker family anywhere between Marks and Clarksdale, and nearly everyone understands the reference.

    Firefighters pulled Bubba, Gregory and Charlotte Parker from the burning home that night. All were tied up and wounded.

    Bobbie Jo Parker's body was found in the morning, burned beyond recognition. She had been shot in the chest.

    According to authorities, the killers raped and sodomized 9-year-old Charlotte in front of her father. Bubba Parker almost severed his own wrists struggling to break free from the extension cord tied around his hands.

    "I've just put it out of my mind over the years," said Bubba Parker's brother Mike. "Now it's come up, and here you go again."

    Friends and family remember the Parkers as hard-working and kind.

    "Bubba would help anybody that needed help - anyone," Sbravati said.

    The Parkers had been attending a revival at Riverside Baptist Church in Clarksdale every night the week they died.

    "They were very faithful members," said church music director Ray Simpson. "Anytime the church doors were open, they were here."

    Bobbie Jo Parker played the piano at Riverside.

    "She was a good piano player," Simpson said, looking at a wooden piano donated in the Parkers' memory.

    Charlotte Jo - a bespectacled elementary student dubbed Chasha (sha-sha) by her family - was often seen riding her bicycle around the farm. Gregory, who wore thick rimmed glasses, would play in the shop.

    Mike Parker farmed with his older brother. "He worked from sun up to sun down," he said. "He was the hardest working man I ever knew."

    He remembers the night of the murders "like it was yesterday" - learning there was a fire, that his brother's family had been killed and having to notify other family members.

    "I've never seen it rain as hard as it did that night," he said. "It rained all night and then the next day."

    The funeral, which Simpson sang at, was "everything multiplied by four" - four hearses, four caskets, four times the pallbearers.

    "Saddest thing you've ever seen," Simpson said.

    Like many farmhouses in the area, the Parker property sits among the flat, brown fields like a lush, green oasis just off the highway.

    But even 20 years after the murders, there's no home nestled amid the giant oak trees.

    The slight mound created from remnants of the red-brick farmhouse is overgrown with weeds. Charred rocks and bricks still can be seen.

    The property is blanketed with poison ivy - a threat to any intruders who may try to disturb the site.

    Mike Parker, 67, said he hasn't been there in more than a year.

    Many say that what happened that February night changed the community.

    "Before that, we didn't lock our doors," Sbravati said. "Afterwards, we certainly did."

    Simon and Carr became boogymen of sorts for this sleepy community.

    "Everybody out here was pretty cautious about going into the house after that," said Andrew Powell, 75, a neighbor of the Parkers.

    After multiple trials - with defense costs charged to Quitman County because the killers could not afford their own attorneys, the crime also had a lasting impact on the area financially.

    "They almost broke the county," Powell said.

    It had to borrow $250,000 and raise taxes for three consecutive years to pay for the killers' defense - adding to the community's pain.

    "A lot of other things affected the economy at the time, too," Sbravati said. "There just aren't that many businesses, and Quitman County is not a rich county, but that started a lot of it."

    Nearly all say they don't understand why it's taken 20 years for the executions handed down to be carried out.

    "It makes you wonder about justice," Powell said.

    Mike Parker said Simon's execution, the first of two in the case, will provide the family some relief.

    "We've always thought (Simon) was the instigator," he said.

    At least eight family members are scheduled to witness the execution.

    "They've been waiting for a long time," Simpson said. "It's been long enough."

    http://www.clarionledger.com/article...text|FRONTPAGE

    Court grants stay of execution for Miss. death row inmate

    A federal appeal court has stopped the scheduled execution of Mississippi death row inmate Robert Simon Jr.

    The three-judge panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans gave no immediate reason for its decision, which came hours before Simon was to be put to death by lethal injection. The execution had been set for 6 p.m. CDT.

    Simon was convicted and sentenced to death in the 1990 slayings of Carl Parker; Parker's wife, Bobbie Jo; and their 12-year-old son, Gregory. The killings occurred a few hours after the family had returned to their rural Quitman County home from church services.

    Simon also was sentenced to life in prison for the killing of 9-year-old Charlotte Parker, daughter of the slain couple.

    http://www.clarionledger.com/article...news|text|Home

    Judge: Questions exist about Simon's mental state

    JACKSON, Miss. (AP) -- A member of a federal appeals court panel that stopped Mississippi's execution of Robert Simon Jr. says the action was taken to give Simon a chance to prove claims of mental incompetency.

    Judge Grady Jolly of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans says the three-judge panel determined that medical records and sworn affidavits of Simon's lawyers and a sworn affidavit of a clinical neuropsychologist raised substantial questions about whether the death row inmate suffered a neurological injury when he fell in prison in January.

    His attorneys claimed the fall left Simon unable to recognize them or to discuss his case.

    Simon was sentenced to death for the 1990 slaying of members of a Quitman County family. The execution was blocked hours before its scheduled time Tuesday.

    Read more: http://www.newstimes.com/default/art...#ixzz1NOEzEtYC

    Killer's reprieve: How long will it last?


    Questions over convicted killer Robert Simon Jr.'s mental state have stopped the clock on his execution, but it's debatable how long the reprieve will last.

    Just hours before Simon was to be executed Tuesday for killing a Quitman County farm family in 1990, a three-judge panel of the 5th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals granted a temporary stay to review a claim that Simon suffered a head injury in January that has made him incompetent for the death penalty.

    Judge Grady Jolly, in stating why he concurred with the two other judges, said medical records and other documents "raise substantial questions" as to whether he understands he committed a crime and is about to be executed.

    "Although this evidence has been presented, this panel has no basis to consider whether his claim has any merit, whether it is believable or unbelievable," wrote Jolly, who granted the temporary stay along with judges James Dennis and Edward Prado.

    Simon's attorney, Tom Freeland of Oxford, had petitioned the state and federal courts for a neurological exam. "I have believed that Robert Simon was entitled to a hearing and it appears that the 5th Circuit has agreed."

    But the federal panel has not yet indicated what its next step will be, whether Simon will be examined or when a hearing could be held.

    "It could be a day or it could be three months," Attorney General Jim Hood said. "We hope it doesn't come to that, but you just never know."

    Simon, 47, was sentenced to death for the killings of Carl "Bubba" Parker, his wife, Bobbie Jo, and their 12-year-old son Gregory. He received a life sentence for the killing of Charlotte Parker, the slain couple's 9-year-old daughter, after a lone juror could not agree to a death sentence.

    The family had returned from a church service on Feb. 2, 1990, to find Simon and his accomplice, Anthony Carr, burglarizing their home. Carr, 45, also is on death row.

    Many, including the prosecutor who tried Simon and Carr, were surprised by the court's decision.

    "I believe the execution will occur, but it's a shame to put it off like this," said Laurence Mellen, who retired as district attorney in 2009. "My hopes are that the 5th Circuit just didn't have the time to review the case."

    After shooting Bubba, Bobbie Jo, Gregory and Charlotte Parker multiple times, raping the little girl and chopping the father's finger off to steal his wedding ring, the killers set the home on fire and left the bodies to burn.

    Charlotte Parker died of smoke inhalation, while the others died of gunshot wounds. "It was devastating," Mellen said. "He should have been executed 15 years ago."

    Members of the Parker family said they are devastated by the delay.

    "We were so close," said Scott Parker, Bubba Parker's son from a previous marriage. "We're ready for closure."

    At this point, the Court of Appeals could determine that the evidence doesn't merit a full neurological exam or it could return the case to a lower court for additional review.

    "The way we read it is that the court said it just didn't have time," Hood said. "We'll just have to wait and see."

    If the court decides to order a full exam, experts will be hired for the defense and the state - at taxpayers' expense - to evaluate Simon.

    Simon suffered a head injury Jan. 7, medical records show. His attorney alleges it has caused memory loss and impaired Simon's cognitive skills. Freeland, in an affidavit, said Simon did not recognize him in a meeting in March and had trouble carrying on a conversation.

    "He was unable to understand what was occurring in his case," Freeland wrote.

    Lower courts have ruled there was not enough evidence to show Simon is not mentally competent.

    Corrections officials, relatives of the Parkers and others have said they are skeptical of the claims.

    "He's sharp. He knows what he's doing," Mellen said.

    Simon already had told corrections officials what he wanted for his last meal - fried chicken legs, pinto beans and watermelon - and was preparing his final statement when the court issued its order.

    Corrections Commissioner Chris Epps said Simon yelled, "They said I was a monster," and laid down on his cell bed when told of the delay.

    http://www.clarionledger.com/article...ll|text|Home|p

    Hood: Expect more 'knot heads' on death row

    If Robert Simon Jr. receives a new mental evaluation with his claim that falling on his head made him mentally incompetent, Mississippi can expect a flood of similar claims from other death row inmates, says Attorney General Jim Hood.

    "We're going to see a rash of knot heads at Parchman," Hood told The Associated Press on Thursday. "We'll have to put cameras into every cell on death row because they are all going to claim they fell and bumped their head."

    Simon's injury, which records show occurred at Parchman in January, was the basis for his attorneys' claim that he is incompetent to be executed.

    Simon was sentenced to death for the 1990 slaying of members of a Quitman County family. The execution was blocked by a three-judge panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans hours before its scheduled time Tuesday.

    "The court recognized that the medical records show an accident that lead to neuropsychological effects and it is so stated in the medical records. What the court is saying is there should be a hearing and evaluations based on this evidence," said Tom Freeland of Oxford, who is representing Simon.

    Freeland declined to respond to Hood's allegations.

    On Wednesday, the federal panel gave both sides until June 6 file briefs on the issues raised by Simon.

    The attorney general's office contends the issue of Simon's mental health was exhausted in appeals rejected by both Mississippi and federal courts.

    The 5th Circuit panel said it was concerned the deficiencies in Simon's petition were created by the state's refusal to allow an evaluation of Simon by a doctor hired by the defense.

    "In such a situation, a holding that Simon's evidence does not amount to a 'substantial threshold showing' might be tantamount to holding that a state can always prevent a petitioner from making such a showing by simply forbidding his experts from examining him," the panel said.

    Hood said Thursday that two doctors at Parchman interviewed Simon and that was contained in the state's argument that the execution should not be stopped.

    Hood said it appeared the 5th Circuit was given more information that it could digest in a short time, and that is partly the fault of defense attorneys who wanted until the last minute to file Simon's petition.

    "We have seen this stuff time and time again, and the judges -- they hesitate because of a little mud in the water," Hood said.

    Hood said he expects the 5th Circuit will send case back to federal court for a hearing or with an order for a mental evaluation of Simon. He said that would mean extra costs to the state to hire its own experts plus pay for Simon's.

    "It's going to mean a lot of expense to the state to make sure all our consciences are clear," Hood said.

    The panel also said the Mississippi court's decision that the Simon's medical records showed nothing neurologically abnormal was contradicted by the prison medical records.

    "On the basis of the record before us, we find that Simon has met his burden of showing a substantial likelihood that he will be able to prove that the Mississippi Supreme Court's decision was objectively unreasonable. The evidence submitted by Simon could rationally support an inference by a reasonable trier of fact that Simon lacks a factual awareness of his impending execution, any memory of the crime he committed, a factual awareness of the State's reasons for executing him, and a rational understanding of the connection between his crime and his impending execution," the panel said.

    Simon, now 47, was convicted and sentenced to death in the 1990 slayings of Carl Parker; Parker's wife, Bobbie Jo; and their 12-year-old son, Gregory. The killings occurred a few hours after the family had returned to their rural Quitman County home from church services.

    Simon also was sentenced to life in prison for the killing of 9-year-old Charlotte Parker, daughter of the slain couple.

    Simon and Anthony Carr, now 45, were both convicted of the killings. Carr is also on death row.

    Read more: http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/art...#ixzz1NTmjzEXb

    Execution delay hard on family

    Our family has endured another emotional upheaval as yet another execution date was set last month for Robert Simon Jr. and again delayed ("Court grants stay of execution for Miss. death row inmate," May 25).

    I feel compelled to acknowledge and thank all those who offered prayers, concerns, and compassion with your comments via the Internet and newspaper. You will never know how much this meant to me personally. I feel I can speak for the rest of the Parker family, as well.

    Some do not have access to computers nor the paper, so I have relayed the comments.

    In all of this, I have decided that no amount of horrific evidence in our tragedy; no amount of venting, ranting, cursing; no amount of arguing, debating, preaching will ever change the beliefs and opinions of some people.

    I still believe God is a just God and "justice" (judgment) will "roll down like the waters." We may not see it carried out according to the law on this earth, but it will come - God will not be mocked, a man reaps what he sows.

    Annette Parker Caffey

    http://www.clarionledger.com/article...ll|text|Home|s

http://www.cncpunishment.com/forums/showthread.php?2336-Robert-Simon-Jr.-Mississippi-Stayed
" Closure? Closure is a misused word in the English language.  There is no such thing as closure for the family of a murder victim.  There will never be any closure for the death of our loved ones until we are dead ourselves.  The families have a lifetime sentence of anguish and sadness." 
Susan Levy

AnneTheBelgian

If I can post this comment :


GRANNY, YOU ROCK !!!

:-* :-*










Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

Jim S


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