Conn. death penalty repeal appears in doubt

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AnneTheBelgian

http://www.wausaudailyherald.com/usatoday/article/39004567?odyssey=mod|newswell|text|FRONTPAGE|s

Advocates say Conn. death penalty repeal will pass

11:54 AM, Apr. 11, 2012

From USA TODAY

HARTFORD, Conn. (WTW) -- A chief advocate for abolishing the state's death penalty says he expects the legislation will clear the House of Representatives, moving Connecticut closer to becoming the 17th state to end capital punishment.

Rep. Gary Holder-Winfield, a New Haven Democrat, said Wednesday there are enough votes in the House to pass the bill, which already cleared the Senate last week. The House was expected to take up the bill in the afternoon and debate could last hours.

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy has said he will sign the legislation, which would affect future cases.

Dawn Mancarella of Milford, whose mother Joyce Masury was murdered in 1996, urged the House to follow the Senate's lead. She said not all family members of murder victims believe the death penalty brings closure or justice.






Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

AnneTheBelgian

http://www.ksro.com/news/article.aspx?id=2146812

4/12/2012 4:08 AM

Conn. legislature approves repeal of death penalty

SHANNON YOUNG

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) -- After years of failed attempts to repeal the death penalty, Connecticut lawmakers in both the House and the Senate have passed legislation that abolishes the punishment for all future cases.

As expected, members of the House voted 86-62 in favor of the bill after a floor debate that lasted nearly 10 hours on Wednesday.

The legislation, which would make Connecticut the 17th state to abolish the death penalty, awaits a signature from Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, who has said he would sign the bill into law.

"Going forward, we will have a system that allows us to put these people away for life, in living conditions none of us would want to experience," the Democratic governor said in a statement following the vote. "Let's throw away the key and have them spend the rest of their natural lives in jail."

The bill would abolish the death penalty and replace it with a sentence of life imprisonment without the possibility of release.

Lawmakers were able to garner support by making the legislation affect only future crimes and not the 11 men currently on death row. Some bill opponents, however, have called the move a political tool.

"It's tough to explain (the bill) to a four year old and it's tough to explain to a 40-year-old or a 94-year-old because to many it is illogical and does not make sense," said House Minority Leader Lawrence Cafero Jr., R-Norwalk. "...We allow the death penalty to continue for at least 11 people and maybe more."

Rep. Gerald Fox III, D-Stamford, co-chair of the General Assembly's joint Judiciary Committee, said he was pleased to see the bill pass after working for years to repeal the death penalty.

Repeal bill champion Rep. Gary Holder-Winfield, D-New Haven, said although he was pleased with the results of the vote, more needs to be done to fix the state's criminal justice system.

"It's just one step in a long movement towards fixing our system and making sure we have safety and equality in our system," he said.

Preserving the death sentence of those still on death row is fairly unusual, although a similar law took effect in New Mexico. The governor there declined to commute the sentences of the state's two death row inmates after the repeal was signed in 2009.

Connecticut has a history of making changes to the death penalty prospective, said Fox. He said in 1846, the state created distinctions between first- and second-degree murders. Prior to that change, all murders were punishable by death.

In 1951, a law was passed allowing a jury to determine whether to impose death or life in prison for a first-degree murder. That law, Fox said, was ultimately upheld by the State Supreme Court.

"There is a history behind this. It has happened before in terms of the prospective nature of our death penalty," Fox said. "...I understand these cases are heavily litigated and every avenue is always explored to its fullest, but that is where our law stands now."

Both advocates and opponents of the repeal bill predicted the repeal would ultimately become law.

Last week the state Senate voted in favor of the bill after nearly 11 hours of debate.

Before the vote, Democratic Senators amended the bill to require that individuals convicted under the new legislation would be subject to prison conditions similar to those of death row inmates.

The House voted in favor of the Senate amendment.

Many officials insisted on that as a condition of their support for repeal in a state where two men were sentenced to death for a gruesome 2007 home invasion in Cheshire.

Despite passing the two Senate amendments, House members voted down a total of 11 amendments, including a measure proposed by the Waterbury delegation that would preserve the death penalty for individuals convicted of killing a police officer.

The amendment came in response to the 1992 murder of Waterbury Police Officer Walter T. Williams III. His killer, Richard Reynolds, currently sits on death row.

Rep. Stephen Dargan, D-West Haven, and Rep. Jeffrey Berger, D-Waterbury, who was a Waterbury police officer when Williams was shot in the line of duty, broke party lines to vote in support of the amendment and against the death penalty repeal bill.

During the debate Berger said he believes the death penalty is an important tool for prosecutors in murder cases and as a way of deterring crime.

Death penalty legislation never made it to the Senate floor for a vote last year after some senators voiced concern about acting when the second of two suspects in that case was still facing trial.

In the past five years, four other states have abolished the death penalty -- New Mexico, Illinois, New Jersey and New York. Repeal proposals are also pending in several other states including Kansas and Kentucky, while advocates in California have gathered enough signatures for an initiative to throw out the death penalty that is expected to go before voters in November.

Connecticut has carried out only one execution in 51 years, when serial killer Michael Ross was administered lethal injection in 2005 after giving up his appeal rights.





Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

JTiscool

That's upsetting.
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

Russki

They might even get an Xmas card from the EEC
Bombs do not choose. They will hit everything   ... Nikita Khrushchev

I once said, "We will bury you," and I got into trouble with it. Of course we will not bury you with a shovel. Your own working class will bury you.  ... Nikita Khrushchev

Kitten Resq

"Going forward, we will have a system that allows us to put these people away for life, in living conditions none of us would want to experience," the Democratic governor said in a statement following the vote. "Let's throw away the key and have them spend the rest of their natural lives in jail."

This is all well and good IF it were to actually be this way.  Unfortunately this is not how the prisoners will be treated.

They will be allowed to intermingle with fellow prisoners,
they will be allowed to have touch -to-touch contact with their friends and family,
they will be allowed state provided cable television,
they will be allowed regular telephone calls to people on the outside, including their victims families should they desire,
they will be allowed to play yard games, breath fresh air and feel the sunshine on their faces,
they will be afforded free medical, dental and vision for the rest of their natural lives.

As for their victims,
They will be allowed to slowly disintegrate in a box buried under 6 feet of cold dirt.


Yep, that's justice for ya
Some people say I'm a horrible person, but it's not true!  I have the heart of an innocent girl....in a jar, on my desk

Victims have a dignitary interest in justice and vindication without interminable delay caused by guilty prisoners' attempts to stave off punishment.

JTiscool

I'm quite surprised the bill passed considering that horrible home invasion/murders that happened to Dr. Petit's family smh
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

Kitten Resq

Really JT?  With all the rich, uptight, couldn't pull a needle out of their butts, right-wing liberals that live in CT?

I do appreciate that the ones already on DR will possibly face the needle though because it will include the 2 who killed the Petit family.
Some people say I'm a horrible person, but it's not true!  I have the heart of an innocent girl....in a jar, on my desk

Victims have a dignitary interest in justice and vindication without interminable delay caused by guilty prisoners' attempts to stave off punishment.

JTiscool

Sadly, I was being too much of an idealist when I posted that 5 minutes ago.

Now as soon as the Governor signs the bill, watch as lawyers file appeals for those on death row inmates.
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

Angelstorms OL'Man

Only thing in CT that will kill an inmate is old age... Just like Cal and Or.  For give me I'm going to go get sick...
This was designed to hurt....Its a SEAL Candace unless you have been there yo will never understand...

JTiscool

So when is the Governor set to sign this? Any chance (even a very small one) of the Governor trolling the anti's and vetoing it?

Couldn't hurt to ask  :-[
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

Granny B

Connecticut becomes 17th state to abolish death penalty
By David Ariosto, CNN
updated 5:41 PM EDT, Wed April 25, 2012

CNN) -- Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy signed a bill into law Wednesday that abolishes the death penalty, making his state the 17th in the nation to abandon capital punishment and the fifth in five years to usher in a repeal.

The law is effective immediately, though prospective in nature, meaning that it would not apply to those already sentenced to death. It replaces the death penalty with life in prison without the possibility of release as the state's highest form of punishment.

"Although it is an historic moment -- Connecticut joins 16 other states and the rest of the industrialized world by taking this action -- it is a moment for sober reflection, not celebration," Malloy said in a statement.

He added that the "unworkability" of Connecticut's death penalty law was a contributing factor in his decision.
Death penalty by stateDeath penalty by state

"In the last 52 years, only two people have been put to death in Connecticut -- and both of them volunteered for it," Malloy said. "Instead, the people of this state pay for appeal after appeal, and then watch time and again as defendants are marched in front of the cameras, giving them a platform of public attention they don't deserve."

This month, lawmakers in the state's House of Representatives passed the bill by a vote of 86 to 63. The state Senate had approved it a week before.

State lawmakers first tried to pass a similar bill in 2009 but were ultimately blocked by then-Gov. Jodi Rell, a Republican.

Capital punishment has existed in the Nutmeg State since its colonial days. But it was forced to review its death penalty laws beginning in 1972, when a Supreme Court decision required greater consistency in its application.

A moratorium was then imposed until a 1976 decision by the high court upheld the constitutionality of capital punishment.

Since then, Connecticut juries have handed down 15 death sentences. Of those, only one person has been executed, according to the Death Penalty Information Center, a nonpartisan group that studies death penalty laws.

Michael Ross, a convicted serial killer, was put to death by lethal injection in 2005 after he voluntarily gave up his appeals.

The state now has 11 people on death row.

Advocates of a repeal say that Connecticut's past law kept inmates -- who were often engaged in multiple appeals -- on death row for extended periods of time, costing taxpayers far more than if the convicts were serving a life sentence in the general prison population.

They also point to instances in which wrongful convictions have been overturned with new investigative methods, including forensic testing.

Opponents of the repeal had said that capital punishment is a criminal deterrent that offers justice for victims and their families.

In the last five years, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York and Illinois have repealed the death penalty. California voters will decide the issue in November.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/04/25/justice/connecticut-death-penalty-law-repealed/index.html
" Closure? Closure is a misused word in the English language.  There is no such thing as closure for the family of a murder victim.  There will never be any closure for the death of our loved ones until we are dead ourselves.  The families have a lifetime sentence of anguish and sadness." 
Susan Levy

Granny B

  September 4, 2012, 12:31 PM

Connecticut Prepares for Trial over Death Penalty

By Joe Palazzolo
Associated Press

In Connecticut, seven men on death row are set to challenge the fairness of the death penalty this week, in a strange trial that will take place in makeshift courtroom in a prison near Springfield. The state banned the death penalty this year, but only for crimes committed on or after April 25.

The inmates, the Associated Press reports, sued the state alleging racial and geographic bias in how prosecutors sought the death penalty. The trial, which will begin Wednesday, pivots on an academic study of 4,700 murders in Connecticut from 1973 to 2007.

The study, by Stanford University professor John Donahue, showed that minority defendants who murdered white victims were three times as likely to receive the death sentence as white defendants who murdered white victims. The study also found that minority defendants who murdered white victims were about six times as likely to receive the death penalty as minority defendants who murdered minority victims.

"The issue is whether the death penalty in Connecticut has been administered in a discriminatory or arbitrary way," David Golub, a Stamford attorney representing condemned killer Sedrick Cobb, told the AP.

State prosecutors hired their own expert who disputes much of the Donahue report, which was commissioned by the chief public defender's office.

http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2012/09/04/connecticut-prepares-for-trial-over-death-penalty/
" Closure? Closure is a misused word in the English language.  There is no such thing as closure for the family of a murder victim.  There will never be any closure for the death of our loved ones until we are dead ourselves.  The families have a lifetime sentence of anguish and sadness." 
Susan Levy

Granny B

Conn. Court Examines Alleged Death Penalty Bias

by Diane Orson

September 11, 2012

A legal case under way in Connecticut, involving a group of death row inmates, has attracted some national attention. The trial resumes Tuesday and centers on whether there's been race, gender and geographic bias in Connecticut's death penalty cases. Diane Orson of member station WNPR reports.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's catch up now on a court case in Connecticut that involves a group of death row inmates. The trial centers on whether there has been race, gender and geographic bias in Connecticut's death penalty cases. Diane Orson of member station WNPR reports.

DIANE ORSON, BYLINE: In April, Connecticut became the 17th state to abolish capital punishment. The new law applies to only future crimes, leaving eleven inmates currently on Connecticut's death row. Five of them are suing the state. They want their death sentences overturned. They argue that murder cases have been handled differently based on where in Connecticut they were charged. Thomas Ullmann is a public defender in New Haven.

THOMAS ULLMANN: It's pretty obvious that, you know, if you are accused of certain crimes in one jurisdiction, that you're automatically going to face the death penalty. And in others, you know, there's some discretion that's imposed.

ORSON: The inmates also claim racial bias. They cite research that shows in Connecticut defendants who murder white victims are more likely to get the death penalty than defendants who murder non-white victims, especially if the defendants are minorities themselves.

Chief State's Attorney Kevin Kane was the first witness and was questioned about the time he was a prosecutor in New London County. When he took the stand last week, he was asked to explain how he decided when to charge a capital felony. This is from a closed-circuit video feed of the trial.

KEVIN KANE: You'd always look at the applicable statutes. And particularly with regard to death penalty cases, the applicable statutes are very precise and detailed.

ORSON: He said he'd look for further guidance to Supreme Court decisions, police reports and witness statements. Kane argues, along with Connecticut, that the death penalty is not applied arbitrarily in the state.

RICHARD DIETER: The death penalty is on the defensive.

ORSON: Richard Dieter is executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center in Washington, D.C.

DIETER: It's declining in executions. It's declining in the number of death sentences each year. And it's increasing in the number of states that have abolished it, with Connecticut being the most recent. So I think courts are now more open to hearing about the problems with the death penalty.

ORSON: By the end of the first day of testimony, the two sides agree that there are no written guidelines or policies in Connecticut on when to seek the death penalty or reduce to a lesser charge. And that each state's attorney has made decisions based on his own criteria.

Connecticut has executed one person in the past 50 years. Lawyers for the inmates had wanted to include and argue the issue of whether it's constitutional to execute inmates after the state has abolished the death penalty. The judge denied the request and further legal challenges are expected.

ULLMANN: It's ridiculous. The system is starved for money.

ORSON: Again, public defender Thomas Ullmann. He says the current trial and any future appeals will cost millions.

ULLMANN: These guys are going to be in prison for the rest of their life anyway. It just seems to me a ludicrous position to take. They should just take every one of these sentences and convert them to life without the possibility of release and be done with it.

ORSON: Despite Ullmann's view, both sides are expected to present experts who've researched whether race, gender or geography slant death penalty decisions. The trial is expected to last about a week.

For NPR News, I'm Diane Orson in New Haven.

http://www.npr.org/2012/09/11/160924588/conn-court-examines-alleged-death-penalty-bias
" Closure? Closure is a misused word in the English language.  There is no such thing as closure for the family of a murder victim.  There will never be any closure for the death of our loved ones until we are dead ourselves.  The families have a lifetime sentence of anguish and sadness." 
Susan Levy

Frankieboy

"As expected, members of the House voted 86-62 in favor of the bill after a floor debate that lasted nearly 10 hours on Wednesday."

This is the fatal flaw..we MUST hold our representative's to be accountable to the public and the victims. The public needs to put pressure on these people who refuse to carry out the death penalty which is the law.or was the law in Connecticut.

Why do we see this anti-victims and support for those who did the worst of the worst?  After the jury of their peers decided that these DR inmates deserved the ultimate punishment, how DARE they go against the will of the juries.

I pray that Californians will vote NO on the ballet this coming November 6th to abolish the death penalty. The death penalty needs to remain for these monsters...and needs to be carried out by our Representatives eliminating the obstacles the delay the process of JUSTICE!

Russki

we MUST hold our representative's to be accountable to the public

This concept died a long time ago. How right you are.
Bombs do not choose. They will hit everything   ... Nikita Khrushchev

I once said, "We will bury you," and I got into trouble with it. Of course we will not bury you with a shovel. Your own working class will bury you.  ... Nikita Khrushchev

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