Conn. death penalty repeal appears in doubt

Started by Jeff1857, April 12, 2008, 02:57:42 AM

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JTiscool

I sincerely hope that the Democrats do not get their way and the death penalty stays put in Connecticut. I do wish that the intelligence Connecticut has as far as the death penalty goes would spread over to my state but that is nothing but a dream :/
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

Naviator

Outside of the DP, I found that poll quite informative.  I was under the impression that booze was sold everywhere and anytime throughout the US (With Utah being an exception).  I have heard of the occasional dry county, but I had no ideas that some states were so restrictive.

Back to the DP, outside of the desires of politicians, it seems the people know what they want.

AnneTheBelgian

http://www.norwichbulletin.com/news/x816844913/Religious-leaders-seek-end-to-Connecticut-death-penalty#axzz1IgflP7a5

Religious leaders seek end to Connecticut death penalty

The Associated Press

Posted Apr 05, 2011 @ 01:24 PM

Last update Apr 05, 2011 @ 01:26 PM

HARTFORD, Conn. --

Religious leaders are urging state lawmakers to abolish Connecticut's death penalty.

More than 300 Christian and Jewish leaders gave legislators a letter Tuesday supporting a bill to replace the death penalty with life in prison without the possibility of release for certain murders.

The religious leaders said human life is sacred and money spent to impose the death penalty would be better spent preventing crime.

The bill's sponsor, Rep. Gary Holder-Winfield, said he expects it to win its first vote in the Judiciary Committee in the next week.

He acknowledges that polls show rising support for the death penalty in Connecticut after a 2007 home invasion in Cheshire where a mother and her two daughters were killed. One of two men accused in the case has been sentenced to death. The other awaits trial.











Other article : http://cheshire.patch.com/articles/religious-leaders-call-for-end-to-death-penalty#photo-5531229










Photo : The Rev. Chuck Wildman, of the United Church of Christ, presents State Representatives Bruce Morris and Gary Holder-Winfield with a petition signed by more than 300 religious leaders throughout the state asking for the abolition of Connecticut's death penalty law. (Credit Dave Moran) >:(















Anne

"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

JTiscool

Quote
More than 300 Christian and Jewish leaders gave legislators a letter Tuesday supporting a bill to replace the death penalty with life in prison without the possibility of release for certain murders.


You can't replace the death penalty with something that already exists, dimwit.
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

AnneTheBelgian

http://middletownpress.com/articles/2011/04/13/news/doc4da5d9cc7b262275543516.txt

Connecticut House panel votes to repeal death penalty

Published: Wednesday, April 13, 2011

Last Updated: Wed. Apr 13, 2011, 12:56pm

By MARY O'LEARY, New Haven Register

HARTFORD -- For the second time in two years, the Judiciary Committee has voted to repeal the death penalty with the historic bill given a good chance this time to be adopted by the General Assembly and signed by the governor.

The early vote by the committee, which held open the final tally until the conclusion of the meeting late Tuesday, was 27-17 in favor of abolition for those convicted of capital felony murder prospectively, that is in the future, after the bill goes into effect. The harshest punishment in Connecticut would be life in prison without the possibility of parole.

The final vote was not expected to change the outcome for the 45-member committee with the bill next going to the full House for a vote.

Sen. Eric Coleman, D-Bloomfield, the committee's co-chairman, said aside from his own moral objections to executions, he voted for repeal because the law disproportionately affects minorities and the poor and is unevenly applied in the state.

Coleman added that repeal puts Connecticut in line with nations that outlawed it long ago, rather than repressive regimes that continue the practice.

No one has been executed in Connecticut in 50 years, with the exception of death row inmate, Michael Ross, who voluntarily waived his appeals. Several of the 10 men on death row have been there for more than two decades because of strong constitutional protections.

The fight has been led by Rep. Gary Holder-Winfield, D-New Haven. "I think we have taken a first step towards repeal of the death penalty. The margin is a good indicator of where the legislature is headed. As the proponent of the bill, I hope that what we did tonight is a real predictor of what this body ultimately does," Holder-Winfield said.

Sen. John Kissel, R-Enfield, led the fight to keep the death penalty on the books, arguing that there are good grounds to do so. "I believe it has a purpose," said Kissel, whose district contains six correctional facilities with some 8,000 inmates.

He said occasionally those inmates lash out at correction officials or kill one another. Having a death penalty on the books would offer a greater punishment to dissuade such actions. He said the threat of the penalty can be used by prosecutors to leverage cooperation.

Kissel said he expects the repeal to easily pass in the House and, while it will be tight in the Senate, he predicted it will also pass there.

He said he was assured by Judiciary co-Chairman Rep. Gerald Fox, D-Fairfield, that there would be a discussion after the regular session on implementing tough correctional policies for those sent to prison for life, that would distinguish them from the general population.

The vote was taken after less than two hours of respectful debate in the committee with much of it hashed out in earlier caucuses by the two parties.

While the bill applies going forward, there has been testimony that the courts will likely apply it to those already on death row to avoid having two classes of inmates convicted of the same crimes.

Sen. Edward Meyer, D-Guilford, said he has been wrestling with the issue since he went to law school and he wants the repeal beyond the practical reasons that it delays healing for the survivors, does not deter other murders and more than 100 people on death row nationwide have been exonerated in recent years.

He said he was ultimately convinced by a remark by former Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun, who in reviewing death penalty cases, said: "'No longer will I tinker with the mechanics of death.'"

Rep. Themis Klarides, R-Derby, said she does not believe the death penalty deters anyone from committing murder, but she thinks it is the correct punishment for certain heinous crimes, and the role of lawmakers now should be to make it workable.

Rep. Alfred Adinolfi, R-Cheshire, said anything less than the death penalty is an insult to the murder victims.

Sixteen states have abolished the death penalty, most recently Illinois, which did so last month, following similar actions by New Mexico in 2009 and New Jersey in 2007.

"Connecticut's death penalty is a failed public policy," said Ben Jones, executive director of the Connecticut Network to Abolish the Death Penalty. "It fails victims' families by prolonging the legal process, it fails to guarantee that an innocent person won't be convicted, and it fails taxpayers by diverting resources that could be put towards programs that actually keep us safer."

A vocal opponent of repeal is Dr. William Petit of Cheshire, whose wife and two daughters were murdered in a 2007 home invasion, and the horrific crime was an important part of the discussion. Steven J. Hayes was recently sentenced to death for the offenses, while jury selection is under way for the second defendant, Joshua Komisarjevsky.

Since 1989, more than 250 people in 34 states have been exonerated through post-conviction DNA testing and the cost of having the death penalty on the books in Connecticut yearly is $4 million.
















Anne

"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

JTiscool

My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

AnneTheBelgian

http://ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=55397

Tuesday, April 26, 2011   19:30 GMT

U.S.

Connecticut Likely to Abolish Ultimate Punishment

By Elizabeth Whitman

NEW YORK, Apr 26, 2011 (IPS) - This month, Connecticut became the latest in a growing line of U.S. states to move toward ending capital punishment.

With a vote of 27-17, the state's joint Judiciary Committee passed a bill repealing the death penalty. The bill should move to the state Senate in the next few weeks, according to state senators, and although they predict the vote will be a close one, they believe it is likely to pass.

From there it would go to the House and then Governor Dan Malloy, who has said that he would sign the bill.

Opponents of capital punishment hailed the vote as a step in the right direction towards abolishing a failed public policy. Ben Jones, executive director of the Connecticut Network to Abolish the Death Penalty, said his group was "very happy".

The bill is not retroactive, so the 10 people currently on death row in Connecticut would not be reprieved if the bill were passed. Only one man has been executed in Connecticut since 1973.

Recently, capital punishment has been the focal point of debate in the United States, particularly regarding the controversial case of Troy Davis, as well as a persistent shortage of lethal injection drugs that has led to several states' attempting to obtain these using questionable means.

The death penalty was reinstated in 1977 in the United States after a 10-year moratorium. Since then, 16 states have abolished the death penalty, with Illinois being the most recent in March.

A heavy price to pay

Opponents of capital punishment draw on a wide range of reasons for why the policy needs to be abolished, but all agree that the system is deeply flawed.

Connecticut State Senator Eric Coleman, the Democratic chair of the Judiciary Committee, told IPS that he opposed the policy on both moral and practical grounds.

"I fear that... one day we may wrongfully prosecute someone for a capital crime, convict that person, and actually proceed in executing that person," he said. From a moral standpoint, "I just think that to kill a person in the name of the state or otherwise is the wrong thing to do," he added.

He also cited financial justifications for repealing the death penalty - money spent on the lengthy appeals process, for instance, could be better spent on education or other social services.

Others believe that many problems, legal, social and otherwise, are deeply embedded in both the death penalty and the appeals process. "The death penalty falls on the poor, minorities, those with inadequate representation at trial," Richer Dieter, executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center, told IPS.

Race and socioeconomic means also play a major role. According to Jones, "The race of the defendant has a big impact on who gets the death penalty. The stats show that if the victim is white, prosecutors are more likely to seek the death penalty."

"Among people on death row, 95 percent of them cannot afford their own attorney. It's usually the poor who end up getting sentenced to death," he added. "It's a broken system."

Coleman agreed that in Connecticut specifically, "There's a big disparity and inconsistency in the implementation of the death penalty."

The appeals process has its own problems. Dieter told IPS that it "looks at mistakes that happen in the legal trial," not new evidence of innocence. During the process, said Dieter, courts "are only looking at the technical legal ways in which the trial was conducted, even though there may be very powerful new information." As a result, even if new evidence is uncovered, the appeals process may not necessarily use it to exonerate someone.

From a purely financial standpoint, the death penalty is much more costly than life imprisonment. According to Dieter, when all costs are taken into account, enforcing a death sentence costs about three million dollars - three times as much as life in prison.

Above all, however, "Mistakes can be made," said Dieter. "With the death penalty, you cannot undo those mistakes if you have an execution. Once you've carried out the execution, nothing can be done to change that."

Public ambivalence

A Gallup poll from October 2010 posed the question, "Are you in favour of the death penalty for a person convicted of murder?" Sixty-four percent of those surveyed were in favour, with 29 percent against and six percent with no opinion.

But both Dieter and Jones argue that such polls do not accurately represent popular opinion.

Instead, said Jones, "Ask the question in a slightly different way and say, 'In cases of murder do you favour the death penalty or life imprisonment without release?' When that question is posed... support for the death penalty drops dramatically." He added, "As people learn more about the system, they're more willing to let go of it."

Dieter confirmed this perspective, adding that when people are given a choice between supporting the death penalty or life imprisonment without parole, they favour the latter.

One of the driving points of the debate over ending capital punishment in Connecticut is the chilling 2007 Cheshire home invasion that resulted in the gruesome murders of a mother and her two young daughters. One of the perpetrators, Steven Hayes, was convicted and placed on death row, and the other, Joshua Komisarjevsky, has not yet been tried.

State Senator John Kissel, a ranking Republican member of the Judiciary Committee, told IPS he supports the death penalty because he believes "it performs a valuable function in our criminal justice system" by inducing defendants to cooperate with authorities.

"It does bring trials to a conclusion, in many respects, quickly," Kissel said. "Many cases... are resolved because we do have a death penalty."

In other situations, "Some cases are so horrific and heinous that it's an appropriate punishment," he said, citing the events in Cheshire as one example. "It's just considered by the vast majority in the public to be an appropriate penalty for these individuals."
















Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

JTiscool

They need to stop and think about what happened in Illinois. Fucking liberals  >:(
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

Granny B

Conn. death penalty repeal appears in doubt

Wednesday, May 11, 2011
AP  By SUSAN HAIGH



HARTFORD, Conn. -- Efforts to repeal Connecticut's death penalty this year appeared in doubt Wednesday after a key state senator informed her leadership that she has agreed not to support repeal at the request of Dr. William Petit, the lone survivor of a 2007 Cheshire home invasion in which his wife and daughters were killed.

Sen. Edith Prague, D-Columbia, said Petit and his sister recently met with her and asked the longtime legislator not to support the repeal legislation. Even though the legislation states that it only affects future capital felony crimes, she said Petit is concerned that the second suspect in his family's case, Joshua Komisarjevsky, could use the repeal as the basis for an appeal and possibly not face capital punishment.

"Whatever he would have asked me to do, I would have done, because that family doesn't deserve any more stress or aggravation," Prague said. "So, I'm going to honor their request. I want to do a little something for them."

Related Content

More: Contact the WABC-TV Northern Suburbs Bureau
Ben Jones, executive director of the Connecticut Network to Abolish the Death Penalty, said his group is still waiting to see whether the repeal bill can pass this year. He said there are still "a handful" of uncommitted senators. The advocates were optimistic about the legislation's chances because Gov. Dannel P. Malloy supports repealing the death penalty for future crimes.

"We want to see if they're going to take it up this year or wait. There's a lot of stuff going on obviously, with the layoffs and everything," Jones said, referring to state budget issues. "If they wait, it won't be a surprise. Right now a lot of things are up in the air."

Jones said there is enough support for the bill in the House of Representatives.

Prague has voted for the death penalty in the past. A granddaughter of one of her neighbors was a victim of serial killer Michael Ross, the last person to be executed in Connecticut. He was put to death in 2005.

Since that time, Prague said she has become concerned about the possibility of the state executing an innocent man, especially after learning about James Tillman, the Connecticut man who was imprisoned from 1988 to 2006 for a rape and kidnapping he said he did not commit. DNA evidence later cleared him of the crimes.

Prague said Petit fears repealing the law could hinder efforts to convict the last suspect in the case and impose a death sentence. The other man charged was convicted and sentenced to death last year.

Jeffrey Meyer, counsel to Petit, said the doctor and his sister have met with certain lawmakers about their concern.

"They deeply admire Senator Prague and her courage to oppose a measure that would confuse and disrupt the ongoing trial against Joshua Komisarjevsky," he said. "The Petit family is hopeful that legislators will postpone any consideration of the repeal law until after the current trial concludes later this year."

Sen. Andrew Roraback, R-Goshen, said he met recently with Petit.

He said Petit did not convince him to change long-held stance as a death penalty opponent. However, Roraback said he agrees with the doctor that repealing the death penalty could affect Komisarjevsky's sentencing and understands his effort to reach out to senators.

"There's never been a case where it's more appropriate for someone to get involved," Roraback said. "If the outcome of his lobbying is to cause this body to take a deep breath and put off debate for a year on this measure, I wouldn't take issue with that."

Jones maintains that the bill only affects future crimes.

"It has nothing to do with when the trial is, when the conviction is," he said. "If this passed in 2009, (the Cheshire case) would have been covered."

--
Associated Press Writer John Christoffersen in New Haven contributed to this report.

http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/story?section=news/local/northern_suburbs&id=8126266
" Closure? Closure is a misused word in the English language.  There is no such thing as closure for the family of a murder victim.  There will never be any closure for the death of our loved ones until we are dead ourselves.  The families have a lifetime sentence of anguish and sadness." 
Susan Levy

JTiscool

Hopefully by the time the Komisarjevsky trial ends, lawmakers smarten up and decide against this repealing. There may still be time for me to write that letter..............
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

AnneTheBelgian

http://www.minutemannewscenter.com/articles/2012/02/28/fairfield/news/doc4f456d3edf09b735084561.txt

Bill to abolish death penalty in Connecticut raised

Published: Tuesday, February 28, 2012

By Jordan Fenster, Register Staff
jfenster@nhregister.com / Twitter: @jordanfenster

HARTFORD -- The latest push to abolish the death penalty took a small step forward Wednesday, but it did not come without protest from some opponents.

The legislature's Judiciary Committee voted 23-15 in favor of raising the bill, opening the legislation up for a public comment session. Republicans, many of whom are adamantly against repeal, attempted to block even that first step, if only to have their opinions stated on the record.

"I'll be voting no just as a protest," state. Sen. John Kissel, R-Enfield, said.

But some Republicans expressed awareness that the death penalty might have a short life-span in Connecticut.

Related: Proponents optimistic about bill aiming to repeal Connecticut's death penalty.

"I think the votes are there to repeal the death penalty," state Senate Minority Leader John McKinney said, anticipating an 18 to 18 outcome in the state Senate, with Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman casting a tie-breaking vote in favor of repeal.

Two years ago, a similar bill made it through the General Assembly, all the way to the desk of then-Gov. M. Jodi Rell, who vetoed the measure. Last year, two Democratic state senators, Andrew Maynard, D-Stonington, and Edith Prague, D-Columbia, blocked a vote on the death penalty, after a visit from Dr. William Petit, whose family was brutally murdered by two men who now are on death row.

Maynard has since said that he does support repeal this year, and though Prague recently said that she was "torn" on the issue, Kissel believes that, if her position has changed, "it would squeak through the senate."

Wednesday's vote did not fall straight down party lines. Two Democrats, state Reps. Jeffrey Berger, of Waterbury, and Ernest Hewett, of New London, voted against moving the legislation forward, while several Republicans, including state Sen. Andrew Roraback of Goshen, also a candidate for the 5th Congressional District, and state Rep. T.R. Rowe, of Trumbull, voted in favor of a public hearing.

State Rep. Gary Holder-Winfield, D-New Haven, one of the bill's champions, said it "boggles the mind" that Republicans would cast a vote that could have prevented a public hearing.

"I don't expect everyone to agree with me, but I expect to have a real, honest conversation," he said.

When asked if he expected Petit to testify again, as he did last year, Holder-Winfield said he didn't know. According to Holder-Winfield, "He won't talk to me."

"Just because I'm opposed to the death penalty doesn't mean we don't have a responsibility to talk about what the victims are going through," he said.

After the committee meeting, Kissel expressed concern over the bill's nature -- under the proposed legislation, the death penalty would still apply to the 11 inmates currently on death row -- calling it "disingenuous."

"We would be forming the basis of appeal for those on death row, Kissel said, an argument Holder-Winfield dismissed.

"Anything we do, they're going to use for an appeal," he said. "Any law we pass with even the most tenuous nexus to their case."

Yet despite their concerns, Republicans do not see much acrimony on the horizon.

McKinney is not on the Judiciary Committee, but he does remember the many hours long debate repeal of capital punishment spawned in the Senate two years ago. Though he said he does "support the death penalty in our state," and expects this year's debate to take a while should it be voted out of committee, and "It will," he said, he expects that debate to be sober and serious.

"I don't expect the debate to be bitter, though it will be lengthier than most," he said. "It's an issue that everyone wants to speak to."





Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

AnneTheBelgian

http://www.ctnewsjunkie.com/ctnj.php/archives/entry/roraback_cant_run_from_death_penalty_repeal

Roraback Can't Hide From Death Penalty Repeal Issue

by Scott Benjamin

Mar 5, 2012 5:30am

WOODBURY--State Sen. Andrew Roraback's position on the repeal of Connecticut's death penalty has become a high-profile issue in the five-way race for the Republican nomination in the Fifth Congressional District.

Businesswoman Lisa Wilson-Foley of Simsbury, one of the other contenders, aired radio commercials criticizing "soft on crime liberals" for opposing the death penalty and accused Roraback of "death penalty double talk."

Roraback, Wilson-Foley, and the other candidates, including Mike Clark of Farmington, Justin Bernier of Plainville, and Mark Greenberg of Litchfield - all spoke Saturday at a forum sponsored by the Minortown Firearms Enthusiast Group.

The Fifth District covers 41 municipalities in the western part of the state and became an open seat early last year when U.S. Rep. Chris Murphy, D-Cheshire, announced that he would run for the U.S. Senate.

Wilson-Foley said that Roraback recently voted to raise a bill to repeal the death penalty, but also told the Cheshire Republican Town Committee that he would consider opposing efforts to repeal it, if state lawmakers don't repeal a law that allows convicted felons to reduce their jail time for good behavior.

The issue is of great importance in Cheshire, where Jennifer Hawke-Petit and her two daughters Hayley, 17, and Michaela, 11, were killed in July 2007. The two men convicted for their deaths are currently on death row and proponents of the death penalty believe if repeal passes, even if it's prospective, it will likely help the two escape execution.

The change in Roraback's position has given his opponents something to talk about even though it's not something they would have any control over as members of Congress.

"The people who serve in elective office should have principles and not bargain them away for political ends," Wilson-Foley said in a news release. "Keeping the death penalty is a serious matter and shouldn't become a political trading card."

"People who say that aren't paying attention to what my position is," Roraback said Saturday. "I still strongly believe that the state should not be in the business of taking life."

However, "I feel equally that the state should not be in the business of lying to victims of crimes and to their families," Roraback said. "I think what has been done is unconscionable because it creates a breach of faith with crime victims and with their families."

"We have gone back on our word," he added. "This is my opportunity to restore faith in our system."

Under the early release program passed last year by the General Assembly inmates can shave up to five days a month off their prison sentences by participating in programs.

Wilson-Foley, who lost the Republican nomination for lieutenant governor two years ago, said she "was making the point that maybe he should look at it again, and maybe he should change his vote."

"I would hate to have the repeal of the death penalty based on one individual's vote as a Republican when 85 percent of the Republicans in our state would like to see the death penalty stay," Wilson-Foley said.

Wilson-Foley said she is "not sure it has been a deterrent to heinous crimes, and I've read the research.  But I do believe that it is just punishment for very heinous crimes."

Clark, who worked as an FBI agent in New York and Connecticut, said he believes it does deter major crimes.

"I don't base that on statistical analysis," he said. "I base that on my interaction with real criminals that committed crimes like that when I as an FBI agent have interviewed them. I've seen the look in their eyes and their face and what they will do to avoid [the death penalty]."

Greenberg said he also believes the death penalty is a "deterrent."

Roraback, who seems to be the frontrunner in the Congressional race on the Republican side, has been heavily lobbied by both supporters and opponents of repealing the death penalty. Click here to read our report on the latest from the Capitol.

"I think the Republican primary voters are concerned about Andrew's position on the issue," Greenberg, who supports the death penalty, said.

"I do think it will be an issue in the primary," Clark, who also supports the death penalty, said. "If you speak to the Cheshire Republican Town Committee you can see how important the issue is and I think it also resonates in other towns in the district."

"I don't think it's an issue in the congressional race," Roraback said. "People are mostly concerned about our economy, national security and energy issues."

Regardless, it will remain an issue at the state Capitol.

"It's going to bring attention and awareness," Woodbury First Selectman Gerald Stomski, the moderator at the forum, said of the death penalty.

"But I think the major issues are jobs, our economy and energy in the congressional race," he said.






Photo : State Sen. Andrew Roraback





Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

AnneTheBelgian

http://www.wtnh.com/dpp/news/politics/lawmakers-to-hear-opinions-on-death-penalty

Lawmakers to hear opinions on death penalty

Updated: Monday, 12 Mar 2012, 5:39 AM EDT

Published : Monday, 12 Mar 2012, 5:39 AM EDT

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) - Connecticut lawmakers will be weighing legislation that would repeal the state's death penalty for future cases.

Members of the legislature's General Assembly will conduct a public hearing on the bill Wednesday morning at the Legislative Office Building.

The proposed legislation would replace the death penalty with a sentence of life imprisonment, without the possibility of release for some murders.

Bill opponents argue that the death penalty serves an important purpose in the state, while supporters of repeal say the punishment does not allow families of murder victims to properly heal.

Last year, repeal legislation failed in the Senate due to the on-going death penalty trial in a fatal Cheshire home invasion case.

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy has said he would sign legislation abolishing the death penalty for all future cases.






Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

AnneTheBelgian

http://www.countytimes.com/articles/2012/03/14/news/doc4f60f47b38838967152745.txt

Hours Into Debate on Connecticut Death Penalty Repeal Wednesday, No One Backs Keeping Status Quo

Published: Wednesday, March 14, 2012

By Jordan Fenster

HARTFORD -- Four hours into public testimony today on a death penalty repeal proposal, not a single speaker was in favor of maintaining the status quo.

There were some objections to repeal aired, however, coming from members of the legislature's Judiciary Committee as they listened to public testimony Wednesday.

The bill currently under review is prospective in nature -- should repeal pass, the death penalty would still apply to the 11 inmates currently on Death Row. It is the effect repeal would have on death sentences already handed down that was a source of concern for some committee members.

State Sen. John Kissel, R-Enfield, argued that prospective repeal would result in sentence reductions for Death Row inmates.

"I believe all the folks on Death Row would have their sentences thrown out for them," he said.

No one argued that repeal would not have an effect.

State Senate Majority Leader Sen. Martin Looney, D-New Haven, for example, said the state should expect appeals.

"That effort will certainly be made, but I will not speculate on the outcome," he said.

Proponents of repeal were consistent in theme -- many spoke about the fallibility of the system, the inequities of race and economics, and the finality of a capital punishment sentence.

"It's just a matter of time before we have somebody on Death Row who is innocent," said Karen Goodrow, director of the Connecticut Innocence Project.

Looney, speaking to a largely Republican opposition, made an appeal based on small government.

"I believe this is an area where we should have humility regarding governmental power," he said.

But, as Chief State's Attorney Kevin Kane said in his testimony, the question of repeal "involves questions of morality."

"Recognize that this is your own individual decision," he said, and some legislators made very personal arguments.

"The 11 on Death Row, five of them killed children, one of them shot a cop," said state Rep. Al Adinolfi, R-Cheshire. "We're saying, 'Have mercy on them.' I don't buy it. I think the needle is too good for them."








Anne

"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

JTiscool

I still want to know where they get these facts

Quote
"It's just a matter of time before we have somebody on Death Row who is innocent," said Karen Goodrow, director of the Connecticut Innocence Project.


Someone should ask her if she's psychic. If so then I would like to hear what the lottery numbers are. But knowing how liberal she is, she'd probably keep them to herself and reap the benefits  ::)
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

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