Ronald Phillips - OH - STAYED

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Grinning Grim Reaper


Judge OKs video testimony by condemned Ohio killer

Oct. 31, 2013 10:16 AM EDT

Judge OKs video testimony by condemned Ohio killer

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) -- A federal judge is allowing a condemned Ohio child killer to testify by video at a hearing over the state's plan to use a never-tried lethal drug combination on him next month.

Lawyers for death row inmate Ronald Phillips want his Nov. 14 execution postponed to give them time to prepare arguments against the new execution method.

Columbus judge Gregory Frost on Thursday approved Phillips' testimony by video ahead of the Friday morning hearing.

Frost originally granted a request for Phillips to appear in person, then switched to a video appearance once it appeared the courtroom technology would make it possible.

The state had opposed Phillips' personal appearance, asking Frost to consider the expense and security involved in transporting a death row inmate to a hearing.

www. bigstory.ap.org
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

ChevyWolken

This worthless,stupid child killer makes me sick,  trying to save his life with all the usual stuff,
for this kind of offenders a lethal injection is much more than they deserve (liked the "gang rape till death" post by SonieLee, would
be appropriate) .  >:(
Hope this one will go through without delay  :( 
Born in Berlin, American at heart

Grinning Grim Reaper

Federal Court To Weigh Ohio's Execution Drug Cocktail
   

by Karen Kasler (Ohio Public Radio)
 
October 31, 2013 4:48 PM

In Ohio on Friday, a hearing in federal court could decide whether that state will become the first to use a particular cocktail of deadly drugs to execute an inmate. It's the latest chapter in what's become a troubled history of capital punishment in that state.

While Texas is far and away the busiest state in the nation for executions, Ohio is just seven spots behind it. It has carried out 52 executions since 1999 and three so far this year, with another one scheduled in two weeks. And that one, the execution of Ronald Phillips, could use a new drug cocktail.

Ronald Phillips, convicted of the rape and murder of a 3-year-old girl, is scheduled to be executed Nov. 14. A court hearing may decide whether the new drug cocktail can be used.

they're running out of options," says Andrew Welsh-Huggins, an Associated Press reporter who's written a book about capital punishment in Ohio.

Welsh-Huggins says the state has run out of its primary execution drug, pentobarbital, which has been getting scarce in the states that use it because its Danish manufacturer won't sell it for use in executions.

Mike Brickner with the American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio says this is the third time in five years that Ohio has changed to an untested lethal injection method.

"We really don't know what the effect of using this drug cocktail will be, and that's the really scary thing," he says. "What we are proposing is basically experimenting on human beings."  These scumbags are as far from human beings as you can get thug lover.

Ohio proposes using the opiate hydromorphone, which has never been used in a lethal injection anywhere before, and the sedative midazolam, which was used along with two other drugs in an execution two weeks ago in Florida. Attorneys for several death row prisoners in Florida filed a lawsuit this week challenging the use of midazolam in future executions.

States across the country are facing a shortage of the drugs used for lethal injections. Some are going from a three-drug cocktail to a single drug.
   
Lawsuits and some botched executions forced the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Corrections to come up with a Plan B for putting inmates to death. A 2006 execution took nearly 90 minutes, with the inmate raising his head at one point to say that the drugs weren't working. And in September 2009, an inmate who's still on death row essentially survived his own execution after prison officials failed to find a usable vein for the lethal injection.

The drugs Ohio now wants to use are the ones it selected for its alternative execution plan, which allows for injection into a muscle when no vein can be found. That plan has never been put into action.

Capital punishment supporters here say it's important to come up with a permanent execution method. Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters, who has sought the death penalty in 120 cases during his seven years in that office in Cincinnati, believes the law protects public safety because it makes sure that the "worst of the worst" will never be rereleased into society.

But he says there needs to be an execution protocol that can stand up in court for the law to be effective.

"They ought to just bring back the firing squad -- I don't care. If they're going to have a death penalty in Ohio, they should carry it out," Deters says."

The hearing in federal court tomorrow will feature unusual testimony -- from the inmate himself, who will be speaking to the courtroom by video. There are currently 139 inmates on Ohio's death row, so even if the federal judge strikes down this new method of execution, the state is likely to come up with another alternative.

www.npr.com
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

Grinning Grim Reaper

Ronald Phillips, Condemned Ohio Child Killer, To Testify At Hearing Over Execution Drug


By ANDREW WELSH-HUGGINS 11/01/13 06:14 AM ET EDT AP

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) -- A death row inmate sentenced to die for raping and killing a 3-year-old girl is expected to testify at a hearing in federal court Friday as his lawyers challenge the state's new, never-tried lethal injection system.

Attorneys for condemned killer Ronald Phillips want a federal judge to delay Phillips' Nov. 14 execution while they gather evidence as part of their lawsuit against the two-drug process.

The Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction announced a new execution policy last month and said Monday that it would use that system's second option: a combination of a sedative and painkiller never tried before in a U.S. execution.

Phillips' attorneys say the department's announcements came too close to the execution date to allow a meaningful challenge. The state says nothing is substantially different about the new system.

Judge Gregory Frost originally granted Phillips permission to testify in person, then switched to the video testimony when it was clear courtroom technology could handle the unusual arrangement. There are no recent examples of Ohio death row inmates testifying in person or by video in federal court cases.

Phillips' attorneys planned to challenge the state's first choice for a new execution drug: a specialty dose of pentobarbital mixed by a compounding pharmacy.

The hearing Friday will focus on the new, two-drug method, but those arguments likely won't go away. Ohio gives itself the option before each execution to say whether it has obtained those compounded doses. If not, it moves to the second, two-drug option.

Attorneys for Phillips are also fighting the state's decision to allow the prisons director or death house warden to delegate responsibility for changes in the execution process. That could include any deviation from the policy, down to paperwork documenting a particular step. The attorneys say that violates previous agreements approved by Frost.

The two drugs Ohio is proposing to use on Phillips will cause him to stop breathing within a few minutes, an anesthesiologist said in a statement Thursday as part of a filing by the state in support of the new method.

Irreversible brain and heart damage will follow and the inmate will die a few minutes later, according to University of Massachusetts doctor Mark Dershwitz.  ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

The drugs are midazolam, a sedative, and hydromorphone, a painkiller.

www.cleveland.com
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

Grinning Grim Reaper

Attorney: Ohio execution changes not acceptable

Posted: Friday, November 1, 2013 8:36 am |  Updated: 9:12 am, Fri Nov 1, 2013.   

Associated Press

An attorney for a condemned Ohio child killer says recent changes the state made in its execution policies are unacceptable.

Defense lawyer Allen Bohnert told a federal judge Friday that the Department of Rehabilitation and Correction has walked away from its promise to make the prisons director responsible for how executions are carried out.

Bohnert wants Judge Gregory Frost to delay the Nov. 14 execution of Ronald Phillips while those changes are challenged in a lawsuit.

An attorney for the state says Ohio is committed to carrying out the execution in a humane, dignified and constitutional fashion.

Christopher Conomy, an assistant Ohio attorney general, says the state will keep its promises.

Phillips, who killed a 3-year-old girl, was expected to testify by video later Friday.

www.thedailynewsgalvestoncounty.com

Let's try the drugs out on this ambulance chaser first.  >:(
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

Grinning Grim Reaper

And in the try not to gag on the bullshit category...


Ohio Death Row Inmate: Doctor Couldn't Find Veins


COLUMBUS, Ohio November 1, 2013 (AP)

By ANDREW WELSH-HUGGINS AP Legal Affairs Writer

Associated Press

A prison doctor couldn't find veins in the arms of a death row inmate during a pre-execution checkup, the inmate said Friday by video in rare court testimony.

Condemned child killer Ronald Phillips said the doctor could only find a vein on his right hand following an examination Oct. 18 at the medical center at Chillicothe Correctional Institution south of Columbus.

"I guess the Lord hid my veins from them," Phillips said, referring to a comment he made that day after the checkup ended.

Phillips, 40, testified under questioning by his attorneys that the doctor said he was not part of the state's lethal injection process when asked to do the checks. A prison nurse also participated.

Phillips said he had a fear of needles dating from childhood when he said his parents would sell drugs and let addicts shoot up in their kitchen in a tough Akron neighborhood.

Phillips, wearing glasses and a white prison shirt over a black T-shirt, testified by video hookup from death row for more than an hour. He is scheduled to die Nov. 14 for raping and killing Sheila Marie Evans, the 3-year-old daughter of his girlfriend, in 1993 in Akron.

Phillips testified as part of a lawsuit brought by his attorneys to delay his execution while they gather evidence against the state's new execution policy, which includes a never-tried, two-drug injection process.

The Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction announced the new policy last month and said Monday it would use that process, a combination of a sedative and painkiller.

Phillips' attorneys say the department's announcements came too close to the execution date to allow a meaningful challenge. The state says nothing is substantially different about the new system.

Judge Gregory Frost originally granted Phillips permission to testify in person, then switched to the video testimony when it was clear courtroom technology could handle the unusual arrangement. There are no recent examples of Ohio death row inmates testifying in person or by video in federal court cases.

The hearing Friday began by focusing on the state's decision to allow the prisons director or death house warden to delegate responsibility for changes in the execution process. That could include any deviation from the policy, down to paperwork documenting a particular step.

Ohio has walked away from that promise with the new policies, Allen Bohnert, an attorney for Phillips, told the judge.  "Close enough for government work is not acceptable in applying this death penalty protocol," Bohnert said.

An attorney for the state said Ohio is committed to carrying out the execution in a humane, dignified and constitutional manner and understands that commitment.  "The state will do what the state says it will do," said Christopher Conomy, an assistant Ohio attorney general.

Phillips' attorneys are also challenging the state's new policy for the lethal drugs it will use.

The state's first choice is a specialty dose of pentobarbital mixed by a compounding pharmacy. If that can't be obtained -- as in the case of Phillips' execution -- the state will use the two-drug method to put Phillips to death.

Phillips' lawyers argue in court filings that the two drugs could cause severe side effects, including painful vomiting.

www.abcnews.com
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

deeg

This is rich.  The new LI drugs may not be acceptable, as if raping and murdering a 3 year old is.   >:( >:(   And although I don't think the executions should be deliberately painful, if this guy twitches some, honestly I wouldn't lose any sleep.   I can't imagine the pain and the terror felt by the poor child. 

Dee
The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money - Margaret Thatcher
The most terrifying words in the English language: "I'm from the government and I'm here to help." - Ronald Reagan

Grinning Grim Reaper

Ohio death row inmate Ronald Phillips seeks extension; changes in his execution


Marci Stone US Headlines Examiner

Ohio death row inmate Ronald Phillips sought an extension in court because of changes in his execution process brought on by the prison in which he is being held. According to Phillips, the doctors could not find veins in his arms and so they would like to change his Nov. 14 execution to a lethal-injection method instead.  ???

Phillips stated that he is afraid of needles and doesn't want it.
;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;

Ronald Phillips, 40, is scheduled to be executed on Nov 14 and he was examined on Oct. 18 and doctors could only find a vein on his right hand. The doctors who searched his arms for veins will not be part of the execution process, according to Phillips.

In a rare, videotaped testimony with an Ohio death row inmate, Ronald Phillips talked about his experience and the video was used in court Friday.

In 1993, Ronald Phillips was convicted of raping and killing 3-year-old Sheila Marie Evans. She was the daughter of his girlfriend at the time. So glad you managed to fit this in!

Phillips lawyers filed a lawsuit to delay his execution while they looked into Ohio's new execution process which would include two drugs: a sedative midazolam and a painkiller called hydromorphone.

www.examiner.com
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

Grinning Grim Reaper

Judge Won't Stop Condemned Ohio Killer's Execution


COLUMBUS, Ohio November 7, 2013 (AP)

By ANDREW WELSH-HUGGINS AP Legal Affairs Writer

Associated Press

A federal judge on Thursday declined to stop the upcoming execution of a condemned child killer over concerns raised by defense attorneys over the state's new, never-tried lethal injection processes.

Ronald Phillips' lawyers sued Oct. 31 to stop his execution on the grounds that Ohio had delayed the announcement of its policy so long it didn't leave enough time to fully investigate the method. They also question the Department of Rehabilitation and Correction's decision to allow the prisons director to delegate execution responsibilities to other individuals.

Judge Gregory Frost said he understands why Phillips does not trust the state to follow its own execution policies based on problems in the past. But he said Phillips did not prove the state's new policy is unconstitutional.

"Some of the changes target the drug issue, while other changes tweak the protocol in various ways," Frost wrote. "The changes do not invariably result in the new protocol being unconstitutional."

Phillips, 40, is scheduled to die Nov. 14 for raping and killing Sheila Marie Evans, the 3-year-old daughter of his girlfriend, after a long period of abusing the girl.

The agency switched to two new drugs because it couldn't obtain a supply of its former execution drug, pentobarbital, from a specialty pharmacy that mixes individual doses for patients. The agency had considered using a compounding pharmacy after its supply of federally regulated pentobarbital expired in September.

Instead, the state plans to use an intravenous combination of midazolam, a sedative, and hydromorphone, a painkiller, to put Phillips to death.

Those drugs already are included in Ohio's never-tried backup execution method, which requires them to be injected directly into an inmate's muscle. No state has put a prisoner to death with that combination of drugs.

Florida uses midazolam as the first of three drugs, while Kentucky includes the two in its untested backup method.

Gov. John Kasich is weighing clemency for Phillips, though the state Parole Board's unanimously recommended against mercy Oct. 24.

www.abcnews.com
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

ChevyWolken

I wonder why the great nation USA struggles to find a dependable, available and accepted drug
to carry out DP on these killers. This country is capable to fly to mars and beyond, so this should be possible. Why depend
on unsecure and drying out european sources? I mean, everyday a lot of animals as big as a horse are put to sleep around the world without searching for veins or torture.   ???
Born in Berlin, American at heart

Grinning Grim Reaper

I wonder why the great nation USA struggles to find a dependable, available and accepted drug to carry out DP on these killers...

The USA has plenty of dependable, available and accepted drugs.  The problem is that no method of execution is accepted by the ANTIs.  This was perhaps their best chance to halt an X based on LI protocol.  When Frost shoved this lawsuit back up their a$$ you can bet the air went out of them like a burst balloon.  So rejoice and be glad...ANTIs everywhere are crying in their Perrier right now.  8)
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

Grinning Grim Reaper

Federal judge declines to delay scheduled execution of Ronald Phillips


By Robert Higgs, Northeast Ohio Media Group

November 07, 2013 at 1:45 PM

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- U.S. District Judge Gregory Frost rejected a motion Thursday seeking to delay the execution of Ronald Phillips, a man convicted of raping and killing the 3-year-old daughter of his girlfriend.

Phillips, of Summit County, is in line to be the first to receive a new drug cocktail which Ohio intends to use for lethal injection executions.

He is scheduled to be executed Nov. 14.

Under new guidelines that took effect Oct. 10, if the state does not have sufficient available quantities of pentobarbital, the drug it has been using in executions, then the execution shall proceed with intravenous administration of midazolam, a sedative, and hydromorphone, a morphine derivative, to be injected directly into an inmate's veins.

The change was prompted by a shortage of pentobarbital. Supplies around the country dwindled after its European manufacturer said the drug is not intended for executions and blocked sales. The move forced Ohio and other states to consider alternatives.

"At this time, ... the scheduled execution of Ronald Phillips will proceed with intravenous administration of midazolam and hydromorphone in accordance with the terms of that policy," JoEllen Smith, a spokeswoman for the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction, said last week in an email.

But with that decision by the state, lawyers for Phillips sought to block the move.

They filed paperwork Monday in U.S. District Court in Columbus to stay Phillips' execution to allow time for a federal judge to review the new execution protocols.

In his ruling Thursday, Frost said that the court was not holding conclusively that Ohio's method of execution practices are constitutional or unconstitutional.   But the court denied Phillips' motion for a stay, saying he had not met his burden of persuading the court that he is substantially likely to prove unconstitutionality and prevail in this litigation.

www.cleveland.com
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

Grinning Grim Reaper

Clemency denied for child killer despite execution drug concerns

By Darrel Rowland   The Columbus Dispatch Thursday November 7, 2013 2:54 PM

Despite concerns over a new method of capital punishment, a child killer should be executed as scheduled next week, Gov. John Kasich declared today.

Ronald Phillips of Summit County was sentenced to death for raping, beating and killing the 3-year-old daughter of his girlfriend in 1993.

A few hours earlier, U.S. District Court Judge Gregory Frost in Columbus turned down Phillips' request to block the execution.

"Because he has failed to meet his burden of proving that a stay is warranted, Ohio can proceed to fulfill its lawful duty to execute Phillips," Frost said.

A shortage of pentobarbital forced Ohio prisons officials to plan on using two drugs they have never used for the execution scheduled for next Thursday.

The Department of Rehabilitation and Correction will use an intravenous administration of midazolam, a sedative, and hydromorphone, a strong opiate. While state policy had allowed those drugs in the past - albeit only for direct intramuscular injection - the alternatives were never used in any executions. They have been used in other states, however.

The Ohio Parole Board unanimously rejected Phillips' plea for clemency last month, calling his treatment of Sheila Marie Evans "clearly among the worst of the worst capital crimes." Among her injuries were severe trauma to her internal organs and more than 130 bruises to her face, torso, arms, legs and genitalia, according to the Summit County prosecutor's office.

"This couldn't be any worse and there couldn't be any other way to make this worse and Ronald Phillips needs to be held accountable for his acts," said Brad Gessner, chief counsel in the prosecutor's office.

Ohio revised its execution policies last month because pentobarbital, the drug most frequently used, is in short supply. Many manufacturers refuse to allow the drug to be used in lethal injections. The new policy allows the state to buy drugs for executions from compounding pharmacies, which mix drugs specifically for a patient or client.

The state used the last of its supply of pentobarbital to execute Harry Mitts Jr. of Cuyahoga County on Sept. 25.

www.columbusdispatch.com

Actually ANTIs, a federal judge dismissed the concern over the X drugs!  :D :-\ :P ;D
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

Grinning Grim Reaper

Kasich rejects clemency for convicted killer Ronald Phillips; execution set for next week


By Jeremy Pelzer, Northeast Ohio Media Group on November 07, 2013 at 3:23 PM

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Gov. John Kasich on Thursday announced he has rejected clemency for Ronald Phillips, a convicted rapist and murderer who is scheduled to be executed next week.

The Summit County man would be the first inmate to be put to death in Ohio with a newly approved lethal-injection drug cocktail.

Phillips was convicted of raping and killing the 3-year-old daughter of his girlfriend in 1993. The Ohio Parole Board previously voted unanimously not to recommend clemency.

www.theplaindealer.com

Adios Ronnie  8)
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

Grinning Grim Reaper

Secrets of the execution chamber revealed 


CANDACE SUTTON    November 08, 2013 9:57AM
   
CONDEMNED child killer Ronald Ray Phillips is due to die next Thursday for raping and murdering his girlfriend's three-year-old daughter. 
 
Phillips will be taken to the southern Ohio Correction Facility's death row facility outside the tiny jail town of Lucasville, where he will be strapped to a lethal injection gurney inside a windowed death room.

Watched by his victim's relatives, Phillips will be injected intravenously with two drugs which will cause irreversible brain and heart damage. He will die within minutes.
     
Only one thing will keep Phillips from dying.

That is if his lawyers win an appeal in Ohio's state courts, because Phillips is fighting his death sentence all the way to the execution chamber.

He claims a "fear of needles" from an abusive past as the child of drug addicts.  :D :D :D

While "eleventh hour" appeals are common ahead of execution dates, Phillips' case is the first of its kind.

His lawyers are arguing against Phillips becoming the first prisoner to die by a "two drug death protocol" of injection of the drugs midazolam and hydromorphone, never before used in a US execution.

America is running out of its lethal injection drugs of choice, principally pentobarbitol, after its only US supplier ceased production and its Danish manufacturer, Lundbeck, won't sell it for use in executions, saying it is "unsafe".

In the past, virtually all the 32 American states that allow the death penalty relied on a mix of three chemicals to slowly and quietly kill the condemned.

Convicted murderers are now mounting challenges to new "drug cocktails" for capital punishment.

A growing list of inmates among the 3,175 on death row in the US are filing Supreme Court orders against states' rights to use different drugs or change procedures, arguing they "will suffer excruciating pain during execution".

The nationwide dilemma facing prison death wardens and in particular Phillips' legal battle has allowed what actually happens in an execution chamber to be revealed.

And Phillips' story is a textbook case of what happens to a murderer with a date for execution.

Ronald Phillips has been sitting on death row for 20 years.

In January, 1993, he tortured, sodomized and beat Sheila Marie Evans for days before she died with 125 bruises on her head, face, torso, arms, legs, and genitalia.

The little girl's mother, who reportedly held the child down while Phillips raped her, got 30 years for involuntary manslaughter and child endangering.  >:(

At the age of 19, Phillips received the death penalty, which back then in Ohio meant the electric chair.

While electrocution, hanging and the gas chamber have all been execution methods in the US, death by lethal injection has been used in most US states for decades.

Murderers customarily pass years on death row, exhausting appeal options and delaying execution until the state authorities set down a date, at which point a prisoner's legal team intensifies its efforts to win a stay of execution.

Execution: the procedure

The parole board voted 11-0 against clemency for Phillips, reminding those in session of the details of little Sheila Evans' suffering.

The board concluded Phillips' crime was "clearly among the worst of the worst capital crimes" and "its depravity is self-evident".

The months leading up to the execution

After an inmate's appeals have been exhausted, gizmodo.com reports, an execution order is ordered by the court and the date of execution is set.

In the weeks preceding the date, the inmate is interviewed by psychiatrists, clergy, and social workers for pre-execution reports and reviews of their sanity.

Two weeks before execution

In Phillips' case, and increasingly among death row inmates as lethal "drug protocols" change, lawyers will file a challenge to the governing state's authority.

The death warden at the southern Ohio Correction Facility in Lucasville gave notice the state did not have enough pentobarbital for Phillips' execution,

Under new guidelines that took effect last month, the scheduled execution is due to proceed with the two drug protocol of midazolam, a sedative, and hydromorphone, a morphine derivative, to be injected directly into the inmate's veins.

In an unprecedented move, Phillips testified in court as part of a lawsuit brought by his attorneys to delay his execution while they gathered evidence against the new protocol.

Phillips' lawyers argued the two drugs could cause severe side effects, including painful vomiting.

Ohio lawyers countered the state was "committed to carrying out the execution in a humane, dignified and constitutional manner" and Phillips would die within minutes.

One week before the execution

In the days leading up to the scheduled execution, the inmate is allowed priority visiting rights for family, spiritual advisers and legal representation.

In Ronald Phillips' case, he will be transported from the Chillicothe Correctional Institution, where he has been living on death row, 55 km south to the Southern Ohio Correction Facility death house which lies on the outskirts of Lucasville.

Family members of both Phillips and his victim, Sheila Evans, will arrive in town.

Day of the execution

The condemned prisoner is given a fresh pair of prison overalls, and an electrocardiograph (ECG) monitor.

He is allowed a last visit from family and loved ones and a free choice of his last meal.

He then has the option of taking last rites from a priest or minister, after which he will be taken to the execution chamber and strapped to a gurney.

The final moments

Until recently, most US states relied on a lethal injection method known as Chapman's Protocol, after the Oklahoma medical examiner who invented it in 1977.

This relies on a trio of powerful drugs, an anaesthetic to render the inmate unconscious, a paralytic to stop the inmate's breathing and a drug to stop the heart.

Each drug is individually lethal in its administered dose - and even more so when used together, but the combination is intended to induce a swift and painless death.

The prisoner is strapped to the gurney inside a room with glass observation panels for the victims' family to watch the procedure.

According to gizmodo.com, this happens as follows:

IV lines are inserted into two usable veins (one as a backup), and a slow saline drip is started.

The condemned man is given the opportunity to say some last words to the witnesses.

When that is completed, the death warden issues the execution order and the process begins.

Five grams (14 times the .35g recommended dosage) of sodium pentothal, a fast-acting barbiturate, is administered first.

Typically used as an anaesthetic for medically induced comas, this should render the condemned inmate unconscious within ten seconds.

Following a saline flush of the IV line, 100mg of Pancuronium bromide is injected next.

This drug is a muscle relaxant that effectively paralyses the inmate and arrests his breathing.

After a final IV flush, the inmate receives an injection of 100 mg of potassium chloride.

Potassium is an electrolyte used by bodies to help transmit electrical signals among neurons and muscles.

However, when large amounts of potassium are injected into the bloodstream, it throws off the body's electrolytic balance and causes a condition called hyperkalemia.

This lowers the resting electrical potential of the heart muscle cells, preventing them from repolarizing and refiring - effectively stopping the heart and inducing cardiac arrest.

Once the ECG registers "asystole", or flatline, a physician will inspect the inmate and declare an official time of death.

Chapman's Protocol has spread abroad, becoming the preferred method used by China, Thailand, Guatemala, and Taiwan.

But even the method's inventor, Dr. Chapman himself, is in favor of discontinuing its use in executions.

He told CNN news in 2007, "The simplest thing I know of is the guillotine and I'm not at all opposed to bringing it back.

"The person's head is cut off and that's the end of it."  ;D

www.dailytelegraph.com
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

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