Bahrain death penalty news

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AnneTheBelgian

http://www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2011/09/29/general-ml-bahrain_8708181.html

Associated Press

Bahrain court sentences protester to death

By BARBARA SURK , 09.29.11, 02:23 PM EDT

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- Bahrain's special security court on Thursday sentenced a protester to death for killing a policeman, and gave doctors and nurses who treated injured protesters during the country's uprising earlier this year lengthy prison sentences, a lawyer said.

Attorney Mohsen al-Alawi said the tribunal, set up during Bahrain's emergency rule, convicted and sentenced 13 medical professionals each to 15 years in prison. In addition, two doctors were sentenced to 10 years each while five other medics got 5-year prison terms.

The harsh sentences in the two separate court cases suggest the Sunni authorities in the Gulf kingdom will not relent in pursing and punishing those they accuse of supporting the Shiite-led opposition and participating in dissent that has roiled the tiny island nation.

Earlier this year, the same special court sentenced two other protesters to death for killing a police officer in a separate incident.

Al-Alawi, who was the defense lawyer for several medics, said the 20 medical professionals, who were charged with various anti-state crimes, and the protester who got the death sentence on Thursday can all appeal their verdicts.

A Bahraini rights group identified the protester as Ali Yousef Abdulwahab al-Taweel. The Bahrain Youth Society for Human Rights said that another suspect, Ali Attia Mahdi, was convicted on Thursday as al-Taweel's accomplice and sentenced to life imprisonment.

The tribunal's military prosecutor, Yousef Rashid Flaifel, said the two men were convicted of premeditated murder in the killing of an officer in the oil hub of Sitra. In comments to the state-run Bahrain News Agency, Flaifel said the men committed a "terror act" by running over the policeman with two cars. He didn't say when the incident occurred.

The prosecutor said the men were also convicted of other charges, including participating in a "public protest," and "spreading terror and fear."

As for the case of the medics, Flaifel said they were convicted on charges that include taking part in efforts to "topple the regime," possessing "unlicensed light weapons" and "spreading fabricated stories and lies."

Human rights groups blasted the ruling against the medics and said legal proceedings against Bahrain's doctors and nurses were a "travesty of justice."

"These are simply ludicrous charges against civilian professionals who were working to save lives," said Philip Luther of Amnesty International.

Hundreds of activists have been imprisoned since March when Bahrain's rulers imposed martial law to deal with protests by the country's Shiite majority demanding greater rights and freedoms.

More than 30 people have been killed since the protests began in February, inspired by Arab uprisings elsewhere. The Sunni monarchy that rules this strategically important Gulf nation, which is home to the U.S. Navy's 5th Fleet, responded with a violent crackdown.

Thursday's sentences came a day after the tribunal upheld sentences for 21 activists convicted for their roles in the protests, including eight prominent political figures who were given life terms on charges of trying to overthrow the kingdom's rulers.

The court's decision reflected the authorities' unwillingness to roll back punishments for those considered central to the anti-government uprising, although officials have taken some steps to ease tensions. They include releasing some detainees and reinstating state workers purged for suspected support of the seven-month-old protest movement.

The doctors' trial has been closely watched by rights groups, which have criticized Bahrain's use of the security court, which has military prosecutors and both civilian and military judges, in prosecuting civilians.

Shiites account for about 70 percent of Bahrain's population of some 525,000 people, but claim they face deep-rooted discrimination such as being blocked from key government and security posts.

The Sunni dynasty, which has ruled the island for more than 200 years, has retained crucial support from the West and Gulf Arab neighbors through the months of protests and crackdowns.

Bahrain's rulers imposed martial law in March and invited a Saudi-led Gulf force to help them deal with the unprecedented dissent. Sunni rulers of Bahrain's neighbors like Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates fear that any concessions to the Shiite protesters in Bahrain could widen the influence of Shiite powerhouse Iran.

Among the doctors sentenced to 15 years on Thursday was Ali al-Iqri, one of Bahrain's acclaimed surgeons who had spoken to media at the height of the unrest. Like the others, he worked in the state-run Salmaniya Medical Center in the capital Manama.

Al-Iqri was detained by security forces on March 17. He was taken from an operating theater, according to nurses and his relatives, after Bahrain's army overran the sprawling hospital complex.

Human Rights Watch last month said more than 70 medical professionals were detained during Bahrain's six-month crackdown, many from the Salmaniya hospital, a key hotspot during the revolt.

The authorities saw the hospital's mostly Shiite staff - some of whom participated in pro-democracy street marches - as protest sympathizers, although the medics claimed they treated all who needed care.

Earlier in September, authorities said all health professionals detained during the crackdowns had been released from custody. Some of them have also been charged for their role in anti-government protests. Their trials are still pending.












Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

AnneTheBelgian

http://www.thenational.ae/news/worldwide/middle-east/14-bahrainis-jailed-for-life-for-murder-of-pakistani-man-during-protests

14 Bahrainis jailed for life for murder of Pakistani man during protests

Zoi Constantine

Oct 4, 2011

zconstantine@thenational.ae

* with additional reportng from Associated Press

MANAMA // Fourteen Bahrainis were sentenced to life in prison yesterday by a special military court after being found guilty of the murder of a Pakistani man during protests in March.

The military prosecutor, Yousef Flayfil, said the man, Abdul Malik Ghulam Rasool, died after he was assaulted outside his home in Manama and beaten with wooden planks and metal bars, the Bahraini state news agency, BNA, reported yesterday.

Mohsin Al Allawi, a defence lawyer for two of the accused, said the group, all Shiites, would appeal against the verdicts and sentences.

"It was a harsh ruling because it wasn't clear who dealt the fatal blow and everyone was given the same sentence without any clarity," he said. "The families were expecting something like this because the military courts are sentencing people to such sentences."

In a separate ruling yesterday, the military court also handed down 15-year jail terms to six University of Bahrain students for crimes including attempted murder. One student received an 18-year jail sentence.

A further 15 defendants were also sentenced to 15 years on separate charges, including attempted murder and inciting hatred against the Bahraini regime. They have the option of appealing their sentences to the country's highest civilian court.

Al Wefaq, the country's main opposition group, yesterday condemned the rulings, describing them as part of a pattern of "political persecution" against those involved in anti-government protests.

The special military court was set up during a period of military rule in place earlier this year, which was lifted in June following a crackdown on pro-democracy demonstrations.

More than 30 people have been killed since protests broke out in the kingdom in February. Hundreds of people, mostly Shiites, have been arrested and many more dismissed from their jobs.

On Thursday, 20 medics were sentenced to between five and 15 years in prison. The doctors, nurses and paramedics were charged with crimes including incitement against the government and denying treatment to patients during clashes between the security forces and anti-government protesters.

The long prison terms have been criticised by human rights organisations, as well as the United Nations and the US government. Late last week, UN secretary general, Ban Ki-moon, issued a statement describing his "deep concern" over the sentences.

Deputy spokesman Mark Toner said last week that the US State Department was "deeply disturbed" by the rulings.

"We are also concerned about trials of civilians, including medical personnel, in military courts and the fairness of those proceedings," Mr Toner said in a statement.

Meanwhile, the appeal of a verdict against seven men, including two given the death penalty and others sentenced to life imprisonment for the murder of two Bahraini policemen earlier this year, was adjourned yesterday until October 24.













Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

AnneTheBelgian

http://www.gulf-daily-news.com/NewsDetails.aspx?storyid=317740

16th NOVEMBER 2011

Terror suspects face life in jail

By SANDEEP SINGH GREWAL ,  Posted on Wednesday, November 16, 2011

FIVE men accused of being part of an Iran-backed terrorist cell planning attacks on targets inside Bahrain could face life imprisonment if convicted, the GDN has learnt.

A top lawyer with experience of defending suspects with alleged links to Al Qaeda said jail sentences of up to 25 years could be handed down under Bahrain's anti-terrorism laws.

Abdulla Hashim added that if the alleged plot succeeded, the suspects could have been facing the death penalty.

"From what we have heard from reports in the media, these suspects were planning something big and had list of targets," he said yesterday, adding the charges they faced meant they "could be sentenced to 25 years imprisonment".

However, he said it was still unclear whether defence lawyers had yet been appointed for the five suspects who have been remanded in custody for 60 days while investigations continue.

Bahraini authorities did not reveal any further details yesterday.

Police announced the arrests on Saturday and said they had confessed to planning attacks on targets that included the King Fahad Causeway, the Saudi Embassy in Bahrain and the Interior Ministry headquarters in Manama, as well as individuals.

Government sources have since told the GDN that members of the cell had set their sights on individuals including diplomats, ministers and TV personalities.

Four were arrested in Qatar, allegedly on their way to receive training in explosives and firearms, and were handed over to Bahraini authorities on November 4, while the fifth was later arrested in Bahrain. Qatari security authorities are said to have recovered documents and a laptop from the four containing sensitive information, as well as airline bookings to Syria.

Public Prosecution spokesman Osama Al Uffi on Sunday named the two ringleaders of the terrorist cell as Abdulraouf Al Shayeb and Ali Mushaima, who are both believed to be in the UK.

They were each sentenced in absentia to 15 years in jail as part of a trial of 21 men convicted of trying to overthrow the monarchy, as well as having links to a foreign terrorist organisation, during unrest earlier this year.

The pair, who are still at large, are said to have hatched a plot to train terrorists in weapons and explosives with help from Iran's Revolutionary Guard and Basij force.

Bahrain's prosecution service claims that some members of the terrorist cell, allegedly funded from abroad, had already been sent to Iran to receive military training.

It has said a full probe is underway to determine the extent of the terrorist network and Mr Hashim - who is also legal adviser for the National Unity Assembly - said there was little doubt those arrested would be tried under the country's 2006 anti-terrorism law.

The five in custody have been charged with forming a terror cell, obstructing government institutions from functioning, breaching public order and jeopardising Bahrain's public security and territorial integrity.

"There is specifically nothing mentioned about weapons or ammunition seized by security," added Mr Hashim, who like many others has been following the case.

Meanwhile, a Kuwaiti delegation is reportedly due in Bahrain to co-ordinate with investigators in the case, according to reports in Kuwait.

Kuwait Embassy officials in Manama were unavailable for comment yesterday.

Kuwaiti Ambassador to Bahrain Shaikh Azzam bin Mubarak Al Sabah told the Kuwait News Agency on Monday that threats targeting the security of Bahrain also targeted the security of Kuwait.

He also stressed the importance of security co-operation among the GCC countries to ensure regional security and stability. sandy@gdn.com.bh























Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

AnneTheBelgian

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-501713_162-57332265/bahrain-postpones-protesters-death-penalty-appeal/

November 28, 2011 2:21 PM

Bahrain postpones protesters' death penalty appeal

(AP)  MANAMA, Bahrain -- A civilian court in Bahrain on Monday postponed a highly anticipated ruling on the appeal of two protesters sentenced to death by a security court during a wave of anti-government protests earlier this year.

Meanwhile, another high-profile case resumed on Monday -- the retrial of doctors and other medical professionals who treated protesters injured during the Shiite majority's campaign for greater rights in the Sunni-ruled Gulf kingdom.

The medics' trial has been closely watched by rights groups that have criticized Bahrain's prosecution of civilians by the special tribunal, which included military prosecutors and judges. The tribunal was set up under martial law-style rule that was lifted in June.

In the initial trial at the security court, more than a dozen health professionals were convicted and sentenced to prison terms of up to 15 years on charges of attempting to overthrow the monarchy.

However, faced with rising international criticism, authorities subsequently ordered a retrial of the medics in a civilian court.

Both cases figured prominently in the probe by an international panel that investigated Bahrain's unrest. The panel criticized the special security court in its 500-page report released last week. The report detailed abuses in Bahrain's crackdown on protests and recommended authorities review convictions and sentences handed down by the special court.

The two protesters sentenced to death were convicted of murdering two policemen in April. Bahrain's state-run news agency said the Cassation Court on Monday postponed their appeals' hearing until Jan. 9.

During Monday's proceedings against the medics, the prosecutors brought weapons into the courtroom that they said were found in the medical complex where hundreds of protesters were treated during the unrest, according to defense lawyer Jalila al-Sayed.

Al-Sayed told The Associated Press the prosecutors exhibited two machine guns, three boxes of light ammunition, several swords, knives and machetes, which they said were recovered at the state-run Salmaniya Medical Center close to the Pearl Square in the capital Manama after the military in March stormed the hospital.

The square became the epicenter of Bahrain's uprising, inspired by other revolts across the Arab world.

The authorities saw the hospital's mostly Shiite staff -- some of whom participated in pro-democracy street marches -- as protest sympathizers, although the medics claimed they treated all who needed care.

At least 35 people have died since February when protests began in Bahrain. Hundreds of people have been arrested, tried in the security court or purged from jobs on the strategic island nation, which is home to the U.S. Navy's 5th Fleet.

As part of reforms after the independent report, Bahrain's interior minister, Lt. Gen. Sheik Rashid bin Abdullah Al Khalifa, said talks are under way to bring U.S. and British law enforcement specialists to help train police.

This would be among changes to security forces, including having Bahrain's king appoint the head of the highest defense council and elevate the post to a government-level office.

The Bahrain News Agency said contract talks are in the final stages to bring in the Western police experts.



























Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

Russki

What is outrageous is that a Formula One race is planned there for next year.
Bombs do not choose. They will hit everything   ... Nikita Khrushchev

I once said, "We will bury you," and I got into trouble with it. Of course we will not bury you with a shovel. Your own working class will bury you.  ... Nikita Khrushchev

turboprinz

Murder convict appeals against death sentence

  Posted on Thursday, June 28, 2012

A BAHRAINI sentenced to death for killing his wife in a brutal attack in the couple's home has lodged an appeal against his sentence.

The father-of-three was convicted of premeditated murder by the High Criminal Court.

He was also found guilty of possessing and using hashish and amphetamine.

His case has been transferred to the Supreme Criminal Appeals Court, where he pleaded not guilty. It was adjourned until September 30 for submission of defence papers.

The defendant earlier told investigators that he hid a 12-inch knife under his pillow and after the couple had sex twice and showered, he knelt over his Moroccan wife Eman Al Haiddhar and repeatedly plunged the blade into her body.

He reportedly planned the murder a week in advance when he took the weapon from his father's home, according to court documents.

The Bahraini stabbed the 31-year-old six times in the couple's flat in Zinj in July 2009 after drinking a bottle-and-a-half of alcohol.

He reportedly attacked her when she refused to give up working as a prostitute.

However, he had claimed he did not kill his wife intentionally because he had been high on drugs and not fully in control of his actions.

But the court had ruled he had planned the murder and had been fully aware of his actions.

http://www.gulf-daily-news.com/NewsDetails.aspx?storyid=332998
I apologize for my not perfect English. Hopefully you understand what I mean. If not - ask me. I will try to explain.

turboprinz

Bahrain Court Upholds Sentences over Police Murder
23 Jan 2013



A Bahraini appeals court on Wednesday upheld a death sentence and a life-term respectively passed on two protesters convicted of murdering a policeman during a Shiite-led uprising last year, lawyers said.

The court upheld the death sentence handed down in September 2011 to Ali al-Taweel and the term of life imprisonment given Ali Shamlo, both convicted of running over policeman Ahmed al-Mreyssi with the intention of killing him.

The attack is said to have taken place in the Shiite village of Sitra during unrest in the wake of a government crackdown on demonstrations in mid-March 2011.

Both men said they will appeal at the court of cassation.

Al-Wefaq, the largest opposition bloc in Bahrain, slammed the court verdict as "oppressive", claiming confessions the prisoners made were extracted under torture.

The sentences were first handed down to the protesters by a court set up under a state of national safety, a lower level of emergency law declared by King Hamad in mid-March 2011. In June that year, the king lifted the measure.

Last December, a Bahraini court commuted to life imprisonment the death sentences of two other Shiites convicted of killing two policemen during unrest in 2011.

The court reduced the terms of four others held over the same case from life imprisonment to 15 years in jail. A seventh defendant, whose sentence was also commuted to 15 years behind bars, remains at large.

Shiite-majority Bahrain, which is ruled by a Sunni dynasty, has been shaken by unrest since Shiite-led protests erupted in mid-February 2011.

The International Federation for Human Rights says 80 people have been killed since the start of the Arab Spring-inspired uprising on February 14, 2011.

http://www.naharnet.com/stories/en/69471-bahrain-court-upholds-sentences-over-police-murder
I apologize for my not perfect English. Hopefully you understand what I mean. If not - ask me. I will try to explain.

turboprinz

Bahrain sentences man to death, 6 others to life over killing of policeman
Feb 19, 2014

MANAMA, Bahrain - A defence lawyer says a Manama court has found a 29-year-old Bahraini man guilty and sentenced him to death over the killing of a police officer in the Gulf island kingdom last year.

Lawyer Jassim Sarhan told the Associated Press that the court sentenced Maher al-Khabaz Wednesday for the death of policeman Mohamed Asif Khan, who was fatally wounded in clashes with anti-government activists in February 2013.

Sarhan says six other defendants received life sentences, while two more were sentenced to five and six years in prison. He says they will appeal.

Bahrain last week marked the third anniversary of an uprising by members of the largely Shiite opposition calling for greater political rights from the Sunni monarchy. More than 65 people have died in the unrest.

http://www.windsorstar.com/news/world/Bahrain+sentences+death+others+life+over+killing+policeman/9525559/story.html
I apologize for my not perfect English. Hopefully you understand what I mean. If not - ask me. I will try to explain.

turboprinz

Bahrain court gives police killers death sentences
29/12/14 21:22 CET

A court in Bahrain sentenced two Shi'ite Muslim men to death and handed a third a life sentence on Monday after they were convicted of killing a police officer.

Sporadic protests have erupted and occasional bomb attacks have taken place in the Western-allied kingdom since the government quelled mass protests in 2011 led by Shi'ite Muslims demanding reforms.

The verdict was announced by the chief prosecutor of terrorist crimes who said that the three were among 12 people charged with a bomb attack in February that killed the policeman Abdel-Wahed Sayed Mohammed Faqeer in the village of al-Dair, north of the capital Manama.

The court sentenced the remaining nine suspects to six years in jail and fined them 1,000 Bahraini Dinars (equivalent to 2,180 euros) each, according the official Twitter account of Bahrain's Public Prosecution.

The court ruling, which is subject to appeal, is only the fourth time in over 34 years that death sentences have been passed on Bahraini citizens.

It came a day after authorities detained Sheikh Ali Salman, head of the main Shi'ite Muslim opposition group al-Wefaq, who led a peaceful rally last week to denounce Bahrain's November elections which were boycotted by the opposition.

According to the Bahrain Centre for Human Rights, the Ministry of Interior is accusing Al-Salman of "inciting hatred against the government and calling for its overthrow by force".

In apparent reference to Sheikh Salman's detention, Shi'ite regional power Iran said on Monday that intensified security measures would further complicate matters in Bahrain, where the Shi'ite majority demands greater social, political and economic equality with the ruling Sunni minority.

"Instead of resorting to worn out tactics, the authorities in Bahrain should initiate trust and pave the way for serious dialogue between the people and the rulers," Iran's Foreign ministry spokeswoman Marzieh Afkham was quoted as saying by the state news agency IRNA.

Bahrain, where the US Fifth Fleet is stationed, has accused Iran of fomenting unrest in the country, a charge Tehran denies.

http://www.euronews.com/2014/12/29/bahrain-court-gives-police-killers-death-sentences/
I apologize for my not perfect English. Hopefully you understand what I mean. If not - ask me. I will try to explain.

turboprinz

A triple execution in Bahrain has provoked national outrage - and international silence
January 19, 2017 3.01pm GMT


In the middle of the night, on January 15 2017, three citizens of Bahrain were executed by firing squad. Abbas al-Samea, 27, Ali al-Singace, 21, and Sami Mushaima 42, had all been found guilty of planting a bomb which killed three policemen - but their convictions were widely seen as unsafe.

Rumours of their 3am deaths had been circulating on the social media of those with links to the government. Once the state news agency confirmed the news, many Bahrainis took to the streets in protest, confronting riot police, who used tear gas and birdshot in response. Human rights organisations condemned the killings, not simply because they oppose the death penalty, but because these executions were viewed as being political and extrajudicial.

The UN Special Rapporteur on extra-judicial executions tweeted:

Nicholas McGeehan of Human Rights Watch added on social media: "These men's convictions were based on retracted confessions and mired in allegations of serious torture." It was a sentiment reflected poignantly by many Bahrainis, who formed huge queues to pay their respects to the executed men's families.

The national controversy surrounding the executions is the latest demonstration of the political turmoil in Bahrain, and popular opposition to what is a democracy in name only. Since 2011, when widespread pro-democracy protests broke out, over a hundred civilians have been killed - many by teargas and torture. An independent report (the BICI report) documenting the events of that year revealed systematic torture, arbitrary detentions, and extra judicial killing in the streets.

Since the report, which the King accepted to much international acclaim, the Bahrain government has emphasised its commitment to reforms. Yet implementation of the recommendations has been frequently documented as inadequate. Americans for Democracy and Human Rights in Bahrain (ADHRB) found that only two of the report's 26 recommendations had been fully implemented, and eight had not even begun. Many of these reforms centred around creating mechanisms to ensure an end to torture and an increase of state accountability. Even Professor Cherif Bassiouni, the head of the BICI team, wrote in June last year that most of the reforms had not been fully implemented.

But things are actually getting worse. Amid the token reforms, the January executions show that Bahrain is regressing with regards to political development and human rights. The country's only remotely critical newspaper, Al Wasat, which was shut down in 2011, has now been ordered by the government to close its online paper, too. The official reason given was that it was "jeapordising national unity and disrupting public peace". In fact, it had been slighty critical of the executions.

Earlier this year, the government of Bahrain announced that it was reversing one of the BICI reforms which stipulated that Bahrain's National Security Agency (NSA) have its powers of arrest removed. The power separation was considered important in controlling torture. Other laws enacted which have clamped down on freedom of expression, alongside the arrest of activists, have prompted accusations not of reform, but of de-democratisation. The fact that these are the first official executions to have occurred since 2010 suggest Bahrain is becoming more, not less authoritarian.
International influence

Bahrain's small size and its reliance on foreign countries has also resulted in anger at the perceived complicity of numerous governments. Saudi troops, along with officers from states including the UAE, assisted in dealing with the unrest in 2011. Many of Bahrain's military officers are from other Arab or Muslim countries, and many have received training by the British (including from John Yates, ex-assistant Commissioner of Scotland Yard).

As a result, many Bahrainis feel increasingly isolated from the global community, who they believe are the only ones able to put pressure on the Bahrain government to reform, democratise, and implement human rights reform. Activist Maryam Al Khawaja accused the UK, Bahrain's former protector, of abetting this authoritarian excess and allowing the executions to go ahead.

Protests in London outside the embassy also reflected this anger. And it is an anger founded not simply on the fact that the British response to the executions was considered "woefully inadequate", but because the UK has been training the Bahrain police since 2011. The charity Reprieve noted that the UK also taught the Bahrainis how to "whitewash custody deaths" and provided training to the police without conducting proper human rights assessments.

As a result of the executions, frustration in Bahrain will inevitably increase. Scenes of people chanting "Down with [King] Hamad" at the police are becoming more common again. The regression back to more authoritarian ways is enabled by a lack of pressure from traditional international allies.

For the UK, this apparent "complicity" is unlikely to change. Jane Kinninmont of Chatham House, the Royal Institute of International Affairs in London, notes that Brexit will likely diminish attempts to support human rights. With traditional allies like the UK less choosy about trade, less choosy about allies, and less choosy about human rights, Bahrain is set to see more instability and unrest.

http://theconversation.com/a-triple-execution-in-bahrain-has-provoked-national-outrage-and-international-silence-71367
I apologize for my not perfect English. Hopefully you understand what I mean. If not - ask me. I will try to explain.

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