Florida Death Penalty News

Started by Jeff1857, November 02, 2007, 03:05:54 AM

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Michigal

Well Gee Whizz... Maybe we should just let Ms. Michelle Rehwinkel Vasilinda take all the convicted scum murderers out for a picnic and a love fest and give them a good talking to...I am sure that would just fix everything ::)  ::)  ::)  ::)  ::)  ::)

I would like to write this woman, give her a piece of my mind and ask her if she has any crazy german relatives because she sure sounds like one we know.

How did this woman get elected as a Republican against the DP? I think she should come stay in Detroit for a few months and see what its like when there are no strict laws or DP for people to worry about, she may think twice about doing that to her state.
Live your life in such a way that when your feet hit the floor in the morning, Satan shudders and says..."Oh crap...she's awake!!!"

I have not met all of the innocent children murdered but I have wept for them. I have not seen all of the monsters but I know they are there.

Grinning Grim Reaper

Florida's legislature is Republican controlled...however this dimwit is a 2nd term Democrat...big surprise huh?
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

JTiscool

With all the drugs and gangs in Florida, that is the one state that needs it. I hope the bill fails.
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

AnneTheBelgian

http://www2.hernandotoday.com/content/2011/mar/16/hernando-could-double-its-death-row-inmates/

Thursday, March 17, 2011

Hernando could double its death row inmates

By TONY HOLT | Hernando Today

Published: March 16, 2011

Three men convicted of homicides in Hernando County currently sit on death row.

The State Attorney's Office wants to double that number by the end of the year.

Nine murder defendants await trial for seven slayings that took place in 2010. Three of them, if convicted, face the death penalty. Five others are charged with first-degree murder and are looking at life sentences.

The ninth is charged with second-degree murder.

Assistant State Attorney Pete Magrino, who handles the bulk of homicide cases for Florida's 5th Judicial Circuit, is the prosecutor in all eight of Hernando's upcoming first-degree murder trials.

The death penalty cases are John Kalisz, who is accused of killing two women and injuring two others during a shooting rampage near State Road 50; Byron Burch, who is accused of murdering former schoolteacher Sarah Davis inside her south Brooksville home; and Steven Wesolek, who is accused of fatally stabbing a man during a carjacking along a rural highway near Spring Lake.

Among those absent from the list are two murder defendants -- Angel Gonzalez and Stephen Horne Jr. -- who are accused of killing the latter's father behind a vacant house in Ridge Manor.

Gonzalez and Horne were charged with first-degree murder, but Magrino passed on filing a notice for the death penalty.

"That was decided after discussions with the victim's family," he said. "I also considered the facts and the circumstances of how the murder took place.

"In a case of a family member murdering another family member, it might not present a legal stumbling block for the death penalty, but it presents a practical consideration," Magrino continued.

Horne, 20, is accused of shooting his father in the back with a shotgun the night of May 3, 2010, and stealing his shorts, boots, cash and prescription drugs, according to the Hernando County Sheriff's Office.

Deputies said Gonzalez, 27, was Horne's accomplice.

Magrino said he considered Horne's age and the "absence of prior convictions" when he opted not to pursue the death penalty.

Wesolek also had two accomplices, deputies said.

Sabrina and Sherrie Dicus, ages 39 and 14, respectively, were charged with first-degree murder.

Magrino said the two women, who are mother and daughter, were "involved in the entire incident," but neither stabbed Ricky Acevedo, 18, as he was driving his car the night of June 20 along Emerson Road.

Authorities believe Wesolek, 20, was the ringleader.

It is likely all three defendants in the Acevedo murder case will be tried separately, said Magrino.

No dates have been set for any of the upcoming trials, but Kalisz is expected to go forward first based on timeline considerations.

The victims in his case were killed Jan. 14, 2010.

Magrino has said he hopes to try Kalisz by the end of the summer.

The three men currently on death row for Hernando murders are Paul Hildwin, convicted in 1986; Richard Shere, convicted in 1989; and Alfred Fennie, convicted in 1992.

Hildwin was granted a new sentencing hearing in 1996 and the verdict again was death.















Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

JeffB

Raoul G. Cantero and Mark R. Schlakman: Florida death penalty law overdue for review


Published: Saturday, May 28, 2011 at 10:52 a.m.
Last Modified: Saturday, May 28, 2011 at 10:52 a.m.



A commission established by the Florida Legislature almost 15 years ago to monitor the administration of justice in death penalty post-conviction proceedings has itself been sentenced to death. The unintended consequences may be significant.

The Commission on Capital Cases, a relatively obscure entity, was abolished earlier this month purportedly to "save" $400,000 in related costs. Among its tasks was to receive public input, and advise and make recommendations to the governor, Legislature and Florida Supreme Court. The current slate of commissioners, a Republican and a Democrat from the Senate and the House, a retired District Court of Appeal judge and a

former county court judge, seemed poised to play a more active role than their immediate predecessors.

However, the Florida Senate adopted a relatively low-profile and late-emerging House conforming bill during the final hours of the 2011 regular legislative session without deliberation. Subject to review and approval by the governor, the legislation will transfer some of the commission's basic administrative functions to another entity

effective July 1, without providing staffing support. Much of the commission's mission simply will be abandoned.

Nearly five years ago, an American Bar Association report developed by Florida-based experts, including a state attorney, a former public defender and a former Florida Supreme Court chief justice, raised serious concerns

about the administration of the state's death-penalty process. With few exceptions, state officials have done little to remedy the problems since that report was released.

The alarming backdrop is that the Death Penalty Information Center, an independent Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit, reports that since 1973, Florida has exonerated more death-sentenced inmates than any other state.

For instance, Frank Lee Smith was exonerated posthumously after the actual perpetrator was identified. He died of cancer after languishing on death row for 14 years.

Juan Melendez was exonerated after almost 18 years on death row after a taped confession by the real perpetrator was uncovered. He observed: "You can always release an innocent man from prison if you find he didn't do it and he's serving a life sentence. But you can never release an innocent person from the grave..."

Among the bar association report's findings was that Florida is the only state that allows capital-case jurors to find an aggravating circumstance and recommend a death sentence by a simple majority vote, e.g., 7-5. All others require unanimity.

In a strongly worded opinion in 2005, the Florida Supreme Court called upon the Legislature to revisit the state's capital sentencing scheme. Then-Gov. Jeb Bush said the issue was "definitely worth consideration" and

cautioned legislators not to ignore the court. But the Legislature was unresponsive.

The last official review of Florida's death-penalty process, apart from problems relating to the state's lethal-injection procedures, was conducted more than a decade ago and was limited in scope. Simply put, this is unacceptable. We collectively place more emphasis upon periodic maintenance of our automobiles than many state officials seem to place upon evaluating the administration of Florida's death-penalty process. These issues require open and honest dialogue, including dialogue about the fiscal implications for Florida taxpayers.

Sadly, efforts to improve the administration of justice are often misconstrued as being soft on crime or indifferent to victims' interests, cast in terms of liberal vs. conservative ideology or characterized as veiled attempts to abolish the death penalty.

Ironically, the looming breakup of the Commission on Capital Cases may nudge Florida closer to a potential tipping point. Reasonable people may disagree about the merit and efficacy of capital punishment, but all should agree that the process must be as fair and accurate as possible.

Calls for reform to carry out death sentences more swiftly and public outrage surrounding heinous crimes must not overshadow the fact that Florida's death-penalty process is fraught with problems. In many respects, the process is an outlier and requires immediate and comprehensive review. The bar association report's findings and

recommendations would be a logical place to start.

Raoul G. Cantero is a former Florida Supreme Court justice now in private practice in Miami. Mark R. Schlakman is senior program director for the Florida State University Center for the Advancement of Human Rights and board chair for the Innocence Project of Florida.

http://www.gainesville.com/article/20110528/OPINION/110529512/-1/entertainment?p=3&tc=pg

"SO SUCK IT YOU "BLUE COOLER" DOPE!"  -  Sylar24

AnneTheBelgian

http://www.clickorlando.com/news/28112381/detail.html

Florida Death Penalty Law Revised

No Need For Second Hearing If Penalty Overturned

POSTED: Thursday, June 2, 2011

UPDATED: 5:04 pm EDT June 2, 2011

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -- The state Supreme Court said there is no need to have another sentencing hearing in certain cases when justices overturn a death sentence.

When the justices say a judge shouldn't have overridden a jury's life sentence recommendation and sentenced a murderer to death, the sentence will become a life sentence. They will not send the case back to the original court for a new sentencing hearing.

That decision was made during an appeal in a 1988 quadruple murder case out of Pensacola. The court upheld Michael Coleman's conviction, but overturned his death sentence. The judge who sentenced Coleman to death was told to impose four life sentences.

The judge can choose whether the sentences will be served concurrently or consecutively.


Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press.















Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

JTiscool

So basically if a jury recommends life, it's life and the judge can't do anything about it? Fail.
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

AnneTheBelgian

http://blogs.miaminewtimes.com/riptide/2011/06/floridas_death_penalty_laws_de.php

News

Florida's Death Penalty Laws Deemed Unconstitutional

By Kyle Munzenrieder

Wed., Jun. 22 2011 at 3:21 PM

Categories: News

Florida's particular method of sentencing prisoners to death has been deemed unconstitutional by Miami U.S. District Judge Jose Martinez today. The decision will not immediately strike down the law and didn't find the death penalty in and of itself unconstitutional. Though, it will guarantee convicted convicted murderer Paul H. Evans will receive a new sentencing trial.

According to the AP, Martinez ruled the law unconstitutional because "jurors are not required to announce specific findings on aggravating factors required to justify the death penalty."

Jurors in Florida are only asked to vote on whether a convict deserves the death penalty by a simple majority vote, and only announce the finding. Though, the judge gets the final say in sentencing.

Martinez's ruling cited a 2002 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that jurors must disclose aggravating factors.

It's up to Attorney General Pam Bondi's office to appeal the decision.




Other link : http://off2dr.com/smf/index.php?topic=4693.0












Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

JTiscool

Well this is going to severely complicate things should Casey Anthony be convicted of first degree murder  :-[
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

Metfan62


Well this is going to severely complicate things should Casey Anthony be convicted of first degree murder  :-[



No it won't.  We do not F around down here in FL.  There are republicans controlling all branches of state government.  Any changes required will happen quickly.
I've got one thing to say, get your Warden off this gurney and shut up. I am from the island of Barbados. I am the Warden of this unit. People are seeing you do this."

Monty Delk's Last words

JTiscool

Then I sure hope the whole majority rules rule for juries to determine sentences doesn't get changed to a unanimous requirement because there is definitely 1 juror in that jury that scares me when it comes to justice being served.
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

AnneTheBelgian

http://www.wtsp.com/news/article/201466/19/Florida-sets-its-own-death-row-pace

Florida sets its own death row pace

0:38 AM, Jul 18, 2011

Written by Florida Today

Florida falls somewhere in the middle between California and Texas when it comes to the speed of executing its death row inmates.

Former Gov. Jeb Bush averaged one every 41/2 months. Charlie Crist averaged one every 10 months. First-term Gov. Rick Scott waited until his seventh month in office before signing his first death warrant.

Earlier this month, Scott signed the authorization for the state to go ahead with the execution of 61-year-old Manuel Valle on Aug. 2 for fatally shooting Coral Gables police officer Luis Pena in 1978.

Valle would be the 70th inmate executed since the death penalty was re-instituted in Florida in 1979. That averages about a little more than two per year. At that rate, it would take Florida 200 years to execute the 399 state inmates on death row.

"Speed is a relative and subjective term. At the slow end, you have California, which has not executed an inmate in five years or more," said University of Central Florida criminal justice Professor Ken Adams. "At the fast end, you have Texas, which offers the equivalent of a fast-food experience in the world of lethal injection. During the early 2000s, Texas executed almost 40 inmates a year."

Brevard County has nine death row inmates. The latest addition to the list was Margaret Allen of Titusville, who was sentenced to death in May for killing her housekeeper and friend over missing money and burying the body in a shallow grave.

"When a state puts death row criminals to death quickly, it creates a chilling effect on violent criminals in our society," Sheriff Jack Parker said. "While working in the jail in the 1980s, I often heard inmates say the only thing that kept them from killing their victim was their fear of the (electric) chair. Unfortunately, waiting too many years for a death sentence to be carried out is bad for the victim's family, bad for justice and dilutes any deterrent value."

Bryan Jennings, whom many agree will be the next Brevard killer put to death, has used the legal and appeals system to remain the longest ever on death row from Brevard.

Jennings was convicted in 1980 of raping and killing a 6-year-old girl after snatching her from her Merritt Island bedroom through the window.

He was found guilty and sentenced to die in three separate trials and has had numerous appeals denied more than a dozen times by various courts. Jennings has an appeal scheduled to be heard Friday before the Florida Supreme Court.

Assistant State Attorney Chris White, who prosecuted Jennings, said there was no way to tell what Gov. Scott would do once the Jennings' appeal is heard.

"We would hope that the defendants who have been on death row the longest and who do not have any activity in the courts in their cases will be considered," said White, Chief of Staff for the Seminole office of the 18th Judicial Circuit that includes both Brevard and Seminole counties.

Marquette University Professor John McAdams, who supports the death penalty, said the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996 was passed to limit the number of appeals death row inmates can make to the U.S. Supreme Court. Delays at this point, he said, might be traced to state Supreme Court justices not in favor of the death penalty.

"The average time spent on death row is about 11 years," McAdams said. "Judges that are opposed to the death penalty know how to (play) the system. They can sit on appeals for a very long time."

The last Brevard resident to be executed was Mark Dean Schwab in 2008 after spending 16 years on death row for raping and killing 11-year-old Junny Rios-Martinez of Cocoa. Since then, two death row inmates have been resentenced to life while another awaits resentencing and a fourth was granted a new trial.

William Cruse died of natural causes after sitting on death row for 22 years after he went on a Palm Bay shooting spree in 1987, leaving six people dead.

Mark Elliott, executive director of the group Floridians for Alternatives to the death penalty, said that Gov. Scott signing death warrants all but ensures that innocent people will be executed.

"At least 23 people have been exonerated off of Florida's death row," he said. "The average time they spent on death row was over eight years. Some were there almost 20 years before being exonerated. Frank Lee Smith died (of cancer) on death row just as the DNA evidence came back that cleared him. No one knows for sure how many innocent people have already been executed."

Elliott also said the state would do better to spend its money on things other than maintaining the death penalty.

"Florida spends an estimated $50 million a year on a death penalty program while cutting and disbanding many well-proven, worthwhile, and life-preserving programs. Why is the death penalty exempt from scrutiny? All other state programs must justify their worth and be analyzed for cost vs. benefit," he said.

Other estimates done by the Palm Beach Post and the Death Penalty Information Center are higher than $50 million per year.

The slowdown in execution has not just affected Florida, but is nationwide.

McAdams said the deceleration nationally in executions might simply have to do with the fact that there were fewer murders in the 1990s. Fewer murders, he said, translates into fewer executions.

Most states have very strict death penalty requirements and no real limits on the number of appeals filed, while Texas has a speedy, two-track appeals system. In 2000, Florida tried passing the Death Penalty Reform Act that would have mimicked the Texas system and would have sped up the rate of executions. But the Florida Supreme Court ruled that it was unconstitutional.

"Should Florida quicken the pace of executions?" asked Professor Adams. "There certainly are people who would answer with a resounding 'yes.' My guess is that many of these people are not aware that so far there have been 138 exonerations nationwide of death penalty inmates, mostly based on new forensic analysis. They also probably don't know that Florida leads the pack with 23 exonerations."
 











Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

JeffB

"When a state puts death row criminals to death quickly, it creates a chilling effect on violent criminals in our society," Sheriff Jack Parker said. "While working in the jail in the 1980s, I often heard inmates say the only thing that kept them from killing their victim was their fear of the (electric) chair. Unfortunately, waiting too many years for a death sentence to be carried out is bad for the victim's family, bad for justice and dilutes any deterrent value."


Excellent statement from Sheriff Parker..   :)


Delays at this point, he said, might be traced to state Supreme Court justices not in favor of the death penalty.

"The average time spent on death row is about 11 years," McAdams said. "Judges that are opposed to the death penalty know how to (play) the system. They can sit on appeals for a very long time."



Exactly... 


Mark Elliott, executive director of the group Floridians for Alternatives to the death penalty, said that Gov. Scott signing death warrants all but ensures that innocent people will be executed.


Hmmm...  I guess that statement wasn't TOO agenda driven...   ::)
"SO SUCK IT YOU "BLUE COOLER" DOPE!"  -  Sylar24

AnneTheBelgian

http://www.wtsp.com/news/article/207167/19/Florida-Supreme-Court-approves-use-of-new-drug-in-lethal-injections

Florida Supreme Court approves use of new drug in lethal injections

4:18 PM, Aug 23, 2011

Written by Dave Heller

Tallahassee, Florida - The Florida Supreme Court has ruled the execution of convicted killer Manuel Valle can proceed.

On Tuesday, justices lifted a stay on the execution and ruled the use of pentobarbital in lethal injections is constitutional.

Valle will be the first death row inmate executed in Florida using the sedative pentobarbital. It's one of three drugs administered during lethal injection.

His attorneys had argued the drug was unproven and could cause too much pain and suffering. The Supreme Court disagreed.

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi says she's pleased with the ruling.

"What it did was reaffirm what we have always said - that this is an adequate and proper way to perform lethal injections. Manuel Valle has been on death row for over three decades and this family, they deserve closure, they deserve finality and they're finally going to get it."

Valle was convicted of killing Coral Gables police officer Louis Pena in 1978.

Ten other states have used pentobarbital in executions this year, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.

"Numerous other states have used it successfully and that was our argument and the court found that our experts were credible and now we will have one less cold-blooded police killer in our society," said Bondi.

Florida was forced to switch to pentobarbital when the manufacturer of the sedative sodium thiopental stopped making the drug.

Under Florida's protocol, an inmate receives a dosage that's ten times higher than the normal amount for sedation.

A new execution date for Valle has not been set.















Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

JeffB

"Numerous other states have used it successfully and that was our argument and the court found that our experts were credible and now we will have one less cold-blooded police killer in our society," said Bondi.




SHE IS AWESOME...  I AM OFFICIALLY IN LOVE.....     8)
"SO SUCK IT YOU "BLUE COOLER" DOPE!"  -  Sylar24

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