Illinois Death Penalty News

Started by Jeff1857, February 12, 2008, 05:23:44 AM

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JTiscool

I suppose we wouldn't want to rush his decision. If his decision is rushed, it could go against us.
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

Grinning Grim Reaper

As an Illinois citizen I have seen close up the slime that oozes out of our politicians, especially the governors.  Dollars to doughnuts that Quinn sits on his hands and lets the DP repeal go into effect without his signature.  ANTIs get what they want and Quinn can state for the record he did not sign it into affect.  Most will forget that by NOT signing Quinn endorsed the repeal anyway!  Welcome to Illinois politics.
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

JeffcoCitizen


As an Illinois citizen I have seen close up the slime that oozes out of our politicians, especially the governors.  Dollars to doughnuts that Quinn sits on his hands and lets the DP repeal go into effect without his signature.  ANTIs get what they want and Quinn can state for the record he did not sign it into affect.  Most will forget that by NOT signing Quinn endorsed the repeal anyway!  Welcome to Illinois politics.


That's probably what he will do - nothing.  I'm surprised that if they were going to do away with the DP that they did not try to give a more severe punishment in it's place in the bill.  Why even have aggravating factors for 1st degree murder?  This is so not right.  This is very frustrating:(

Grinning Grim Reaper

Unfortunately many people I talk with have resigned themselves to Illinois repealing the DP.  Many cite the Brown's Chicken murders...James Degorski and Juan Luna brutally executed seven people ranging from ages 16 to 50 just to do something big...and neither got the death penalty.  Both were given lwop.  If Illinois won't execute these two animals, will they ever give it to anyone?
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

JTiscool

Let's hope the public's impute will sway Quinn.
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

Hutchsmash

I may be wrong here, but aren't our elected officials supposed to follow the will of the people?  Before the IL lawmakers passed this legislation did they offer it up for public review and voting?  Seems a shame if this were to be signed into law without the citizens being able to tell the lawmakers what they want.
"How come life in prison doesn't mean life? Until it does, we're not ready to do away with the death penalty. Stop thinking in terms of "punishment" for a minute and think in terms of safeguarding innocent people from incorrigible murderers."

JESSE VENTURA, I Ain't Got Time to Bleed

JTiscool


Unfortunately many people I talk with have resigned themselves to Illinois repealing the DP.  Many cite the Brown's Chicken murders...James Degorski and Juan Luna brutally executed seven people ranging from ages 16 to 50 just to do something big...and neither got the death penalty.  Both were given lwop.  If Illinois won't execute these two animals, will they ever give it to anyone?


Oh, I must also add the murderer of Sylvia Linkens (sp?) should have got the death penalty but got Life instead. I believe the Sylvia case is from Illinois but I could be wrong.
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

Grinning Grim Reaper

The last poll I saw showed IL citizens in support of the DP by almost a 2:1 margin.  64% for was the actual number.  For the better part of my life IL pols have taken the elitist attitude that they know better and ignore the will of the people.  What makes this DP repeal (along with an 86% state tax hike) even worse was that it was done in the lame duck session just before the new house and senate from the November elections were seated.  Guess what...while the democrats maintained control, the republicans closed the gap and the vote probably would not have gone through with the additional GOP seats.  Business as usual in IL politics.
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

JeffcoCitizen

If anyone is a resident of Illinois or if you know someone who lives there please tell them to contact Governor Quinn to veto this bill.  I am not a resident, but I responded anyway:)

I found on Wikipedia the two cases mentioned in the two posts above.

Brown's Chicken Massacre - Illinois
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown%27s_Chicken_massacre

Sylvia Likens - Indiana (was featured on TruTV also)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sylvia_Likens

JTiscool


If anyone is a resident of Illinois or if you know someone who lives there please tell them to contact Governor Quinn to veto this bill.  I am not a resident, but I responded anyway:)

I found on Wikipedia the two cases mentioned in the two posts above.

Brown's Chicken Massacre - Illinois
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown%27s_Chicken_massacre

Sylvia Likens - Indiana (was featured on TruTV also)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sylvia_Likens


I'm not a resident but can you tell me how to contact him? I want to do my part on this forum and help keep justice alive.
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

Grinning Grim Reaper

Here is the link to contact Governor Quinn - at this link is online email option
http://www2.illinois.gov/gov/Pages/ContacttheGovernor.aspx

By Phone or Mail

Springfield
Office of the Governor
207 State House
Springfield, IL 62706
Phone: 217-782-0244
TTY: 888-261-3336
   
Chicago
Office of the Governor
James R. Thompson Center
100 W. Randolph, 16-100
Chicago, IL 60601
Phone: 312-814-2121
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

JTiscool

I shall send an email when I get together what I'm going to ask. I need to think of some pretty unique and solid arguments.
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

JeffB

Quinn still silent on death penalty

BY KEVIN McDERMOTT > kmcdermott@post-dispatch.com > 217-782-4912 www.STLtoday.com



SPRINGFIELD, Ill.--Gov. Pat Quinn hasn't yet announced whether he'll sign into law the abolition of Illinois' death penalty, which passed the Legislature in the last session.

Quinn has professed to be pro-death-penalty in principle, but also has kept in place Illinois' moratorium on executions, saying he wasn't yet convinced that Illinois' mistake-prone capital punishment system has been fully reformed.

The lingering question of whether he would sign the bill formally abolishing the death penalty seemed to have been mostly answered at a news conference two weeks ago, when he was dropping subtle hints that he would approve it. ``I will follow my conscience,'' he said.

But as of today, the question is still lingering, which has some death penalty opponents a little perturbed.

We won't attempt here to read Quinn's mind, but others are trying. Here's one theory, highlighted by Capitol Fax, an Illinois political newsletter, which theorizes that Quinn fully intends to sign the bill--but that he's looking for a way to do it without making the pro-execution folks too angry with him. Which would be classic Quinn.

He has 60 days to make a decision on the bill. He can sign it, veto it, amendatorily veto it, or do nothing, in which case it will go into law by itself after 60 days.

It's not unusual for governors to push the envelope on that 60-day deadline for bills that are controversial, unless it's something they've championed. Quinn championed the state's new income tax hike, for example, and he signed it as soon as it passed. But he was notably absent from the heated debate over whether to abolish capital punishment.

There's no word from his office of when he might announce a decision on the bill, except that it won't be this weekend.

http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/political-fix/article_613bb2d8-2b20-11e0-9526-00127992bc8b.html
"SO SUCK IT YOU "BLUE COOLER" DOPE!"  -  Sylar24

JTiscool

Death penalty opponents should be grateful. They have a 2/3 shot at getting what they want.
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

JeffcoCitizen

I haven't seen anything about Quinn signing or not signing the bill yet, but I did find this one.

_____

Bill would reinstate death penalty in Illinois

Feb 16, 2011
SPRINGFIELD --
Two Republicans have introduced bills that would reinstate and further reform the death penalty if Gov. Pat Quinn signs a bill abolishing it.

House Bill 1520, sponsored by Rep. Dennis Reboletti, R-Elmhurst, would ask voters at the November 2012 election whether or not they want Illinois to have capital punishment. The referendum would be advisory.

House Bill 1519, also sponsored by Reboletti, would reduce the number of aggravating factors for which the death penalty can be imposed.

And Senate Bill 2277, sponsored by state Sen. Kirk Dillard, R-Hinsdale, creates a panel that would have to pre-approve cases in which prosecutors seek the death penalty.

The two House bills would go into effect upon passage only if Quinn signs the death-penalty abolition bill sitting on his desk. The governor has said he is weighing the merits of capital punishment and trying to hear from opponents and supporters before he makes up his mind.

Dillard criticized the Legislature for passing the death penalty repeal during the lame-duck session in January, before the current members of the Legislature were sworn in.

"In the Senate, we never had a thorough discussion of the death penalty," Dillard said at a Statehouse news conference on Tuesday. "My constituents believe that the death penalty should remain intact for the so-called worst of the worst."

But during a lengthy debate in the Senate Judiciary Committee Jan. 11, Dillard said, "I don't mind playing Solomon at this 11th hour. It doesn't bother me. This is a topic that those of us who are senators have thought about and somewhat know where we are."

Asked Tuesday about previous debates the Senate had on the issue, Dillard said it wasn't so much longtime legislators who need hearings but new legislators.

"It made their head swim," he said.

Supporters and opponents of the death penalty continue to push for Quinn, who has stated that he favors the death penalty, to take their side. Exonerated death-row inmate Randy Steidl held a news conference on Monday saying that he has requested a meeting with the governor.

When asked what he planned to tell the governor, Steidl said, "I would say, 'Governor, don't repeat the mistakes of the past,' " referring to the 20 Illinoisans on death row who were later found innocent.

"Repeal ... is the only reform that will actually work."


HB1519

Would allow prosecutors to seek the death penalty only if:

- The murder victim was a witness to a crime, or a judge, juror, prosecutor or defense attorney

- The murder victim was tortured

- The murder victim was a police officer

- The murder victim was a correctional officer

- The defendant murdered more than one person



SB2277

Would create a State Death Penalty Review Committee. The committee would consist of the attorney general or his or her designee, the Cook County state's attorney, the president of the State's Attorney's Association and another state's attorney and a retired judge appointed by the governor. An alternate member would be appointed by the governor in case of ties. The committee would approve or disapprove of all requests by prosecutors to seek the death penalty in first-degree murder cases.

http://www.pjstar.com/news/x938336583/Bill-would-reinstate-death-penalty


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