Illinois Death Penalty News

Started by Jeff1857, February 12, 2008, 05:23:44 AM

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JTiscool

Well, that sucks.
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

Rick4404

Even if the Illinois Senate goes along and passes the repeal bill as well, it still would have to go to Gov. Pat Quinn for his signature or rejection by veto. Quinn, a Democrat, has followed his predecessors and kept the moratorium in place on all executions in Illinois. While prosecutors are still free to seek death sentences in cases where it is appropriate, there's no telling when the next Illinois execution will take place, if at all.

I believe Quinn is anti-death penalty in his views.

Naviator

Pat Quinn???  Isn't he still coaching in the NHL?

Rick4404


Pat Quinn???  Isn't he still coaching in the NHL?

Different Pat Quinn. The governor of Illinois is Patrick Joseph Quinn. He was the lieutenant governor under Rod Blagojevich, who was impeached and removed from office as governor amidst the scandal of the allegations concerning his accepting of bribes to influence who he was going to appoint to the U.S. Senate to fill Barack Obama's seat when Obama became President of the United States.

Naviator

Rick, I appreciate the clarification, as switching job titles from NHL coach to governor seemed a little far-fetched...

JeffB

Speaking of Pat Quinn:

ILLINOIS:

Illinois governor to "reflect" before death penalty decision


Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn said on Wednesday he would "reflect" on the death penalty ban passed by the state legislature before deciding whether to sign it.

"Anyone in Illinois who has an opinion, I'm happy to listen and reflect and I'll follow my conscience," Quinn told reporters. If he agrees to the ban, Illinois will be the first state since 2009 to abolish executions.

The Illinois Senate voted for the ban Tuesday afternoon. The House had approved it last week. Quinn said the opinion of the members of the legislature is "very serious indeed."

Illinois has not executed anyone for more than a decade after former Republican Gov. George Ryan imposed a moratorium on the death penalty in January 2000. This followed a series of revelations that more than a dozen people had been sent to Death Row who were later found to be innocent.

Quinn, a Democrat, has said in the past that he approved of the death penalty for the most heinous crimes, but wanted to continue the moratorium.

Ryan took 167 prisoners off the state's death row in 2003, and pardoned another 4. According to the Illinois Coalition Against the Death Penalty, 20 Illinois death row prisoners were found innocent. Reasons for release included prosecutorial errors, lying by witnesses and confessions by others.

Lawrence Marshall, a Stanford Law School professor who had represented several freed Illinois Death Row inmates, said the problem with trying to limit the death penalty to "heinous" crimes is that the emotion surrounding those crimes can lead to errors.

"It's the very kind of passion that triggers the desire for the death penalty in a particular case that does have the potential to be blinding," said Marshall, who co-founded the Center on Wrongful Convictions at Northwestern University.

Among Marshall's clients was Rolando Cruz, who was on Death Row for years for the 1983 murder of 10-year-old Jeanine Nicarico, even though another man, Brian Dugan, admitted to the crime. After Cruz was freed, Dugan was convicted and is now on death row.

Opponents of lifting the ban include the Illinois State's Attorneys Association, which has said the death penalty is needed for law enforcement and to achieve justice.

If Quinn signs the bill, Illinois would be the 16th state, plus the District of Columbia, to have no death penalty. New Mexico in 2009 was the last state to abolish the death penalty. There have been no executions in Illinois since 1999. The number of executions in the U.S. dropped 12 % last year, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.

Other states where legislation has been introduced to ban the death penalty include Colorado and Kansas.

(source: Reuters)

"SO SUCK IT YOU "BLUE COOLER" DOPE!"  -  Sylar24

JeffcoCitizen

http://www.ncadp.org/assets/FamiliesLetter.pdf

I found this posted on another blog.  The title is Murder Victims Families Support Repealing the Death Penalty

and it's addressed to Illinois General Assembly.  It lists the persons name as well as the victim.

Now, when I look at this letter I have to wonder who are these people???   I know that people in my homicide victims group don't feel this way.

I am wondering if they are distant relatives.  Makes me wonder what their motive is and why are they not affected by their loved ones death.

JonnyTwoToes


http://www.ncadp.org/assets/FamiliesLetter.pdf

I found this posted on another blog.  The title is Murder Victims Families Support Repealing the Death Penalty

and it's addressed to Illinois General Assembly.  It lists the persons name as well as the victim.

Now, when I look at this letter I have to wonder who are these people???   I know that people in my homicide victims group don't feel this way.

I am wondering if they are distant relatives.  Makes me wonder what their motive is and why are they not affected by their loved ones death.


I suggest they are just as effected by the death of their family members as you, or those in your group are.
We all have a different way of dealing with death and tragedy.  Some may feel that to kill someone in the name of their loved one isn't the right thing to do.


JTiscool

Some victim's families feel that the death penalty is too good for them or they don't want the murderer's family to go through the same stuff as them.
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

JeffcoCitizen

Quinn wants public input on death penalty

Associated Press - January 19, 2011
URBANA, Ill. (AP) - Gov. Pat Quinn says he'd like to hear from the citizens of Illinois before he decides whether to sign legislation that would abolish the death penalty in the state.

During an event at the University of Illinois on Wednesday, Quinn said he's already weighing input from prosecutors, clergy and others on the bill passed this month by the General Assembly.

The governor wouldn't say when he'll make a decision. He says he's going through a period of what he called "reflection and review."

Quinn has said he supports the death penalty. But he also has kept a moratorium on capital punishment put in place in 2000 by Gov. George Ryan after courts overturned the death sentences of 13 men after finding them innocent.

http://www.kwqc.com/Global/story.asp?S=13870503

********

Here is the link to contact Governor Quinn - at this link is online email option
http://www2.illinois.gov/gov/Pages/ContacttheGovernor.aspx

By Phone or Mail

Springfield
Office of the Governor
207 State House
Springfield, IL 62706
Phone: 217-782-0244
TTY: 888-261-3336
   
Chicago
Office of the Governor
James R. Thompson Center
100 W. Randolph, 16-100
Chicago, IL 60601
Phone: 312-814-2121

JTiscool

I sure hope the public favors the death penalty by a large margin.
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

JTiscool

Any news on this?
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

JeffcoCitizen

Quinn silent on death penalty ban

January 25, 2011
Gov. Pat Quinn has neither signed nor vetoed the death penalty ban passed by the state legislature earlier this month and he's been tight-lipped about what he will do.

Many are frustrated by the lack of resolution on the death penalty issue.

Edreick Justice's daughter Erin, according to prosecutors, was murdered in 2004 by her stepfather, Laurence Lovejoy. Justice has a message for Quinn.

"Do your job. Let us be safe, and let us know that justice is served for people that deserve the punishment," said Justice.

In a Wheaton courtroom Tuesday, Lovejoy's capital murder case got underway, even as the governor remains silent on whether he'll sign or veto a bill to abolish the state's death penalty.

"As taxpayers, we can't put kids through school, but we pay them for life in prison and feed them, house them, clothe them. If you do a horrendous crime, you deserve a horrendous punishment," said Justice.

As the death penalty's fate hangs in the balance, some say defendants' fates could be affected in the meantime.

In court Monday, DuPage County Judge John Kinsella called "grossly irresponsible," saying "he needs to state his position one way or the other."

A governor's spokesperson says he's still studying the bill and hearing opinions on the issue.

"Because this is such a significant piece of legislation and because of what this new law would mean for the state of Illinois, we think it would be irresponsible not to be reviewing this extremely carefully before acting on it," said Annie Thompson, Quinn's press secretary.

"It leaves judges in an awkward position, it leaves prosecutors in an awkward position, it leaves everybody in an awkward position. And there's no need for it," said Andrea Lyon, DePaul University law professor.

Lyon, an anti-death penalty advocate, says everything from jury selection to resources and scheduling are different in capital cases. She says that can influence verdicts.

"I would imagine that most judges, most prosecutors and most defense attorneys would prefer not to do anything much on these cases until we know whether we have a death penalty in Illinois at all," said Lyon.

For years, a death penalty moratorium has been in place in Illinois, but prosecutors have continued to seek capital punishment. If the governor signs the bill, all sentences, past, present and future, would be affected.

Quinn has until mid-March to sign or veto the bill. If he does nothing, it becomes law on its own.

http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?section=news/local&id=7918916

********************

The deadline to either sign or veto the bill is March 12.  If he signs it then it won't go into effect until July 1, 2011. 

The Gallop Poll says 64% support the death penalty - here's that link
http://www.gallup.com/poll/144284/Support-Death-Penalty-Cases-Murder.aspx

So, we will just have to wait and see....


JeffB

Reboletti Fighting for Death Penalty


A former assistant state's attorney turned state representative says Governor Pat Quinn should veto a bill that would repeal the death penalty.

State Representative Dennis Reboletti says there are cases where the death penalty should be used, and encourages Quinn to veto the legislation that repeals it.

"I think that we can bring the process back, that we can be sure that we are executing those that deserve the ultimate penalty," Reboletti said.

Reboletti's comments come after Lt. Gov. Sheila Simon called on Quinn to sign the legislation into law.

Reboletti says if the bill becomes law, he will likely introduce legislation to reinstate the death penalty but with needed reforms.

(source: Illinois Radio Network)
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GO GET`EM DENNIS...  YOU'RE THE MAN ..  :)




"SO SUCK IT YOU "BLUE COOLER" DOPE!"  -  Sylar24

Rick4404

The problem if Gov. Quinn does sign the repeal bill, then everyone who is presently on death row is going to challenge that their sentences are unlawful. The bill is not retroactive, meaning the present occupants of death row would still face execution since the law changed after they were sentenced. Of course, the governor does have the option of commuting their sentences to life in prison if he does sign the bill into law.

This will further confuse Illinois' criminal procedures. This will simply give the anti death penalty groups renewed vigor to continue their crusades.

Quinn should veto the bill. At least this legislation has raised awareness to a new level that the Illinois system does need major reform - and perhaps this has gotten everyone off of dead center - and hopefully some real reforms can come out of these discussions.

This is a subject which has been getting tossed around in one form or another in Illinois ever since now-disgraced and now federal prison inmate former Gov. George Ryan first imposed the execution moratorium and then emptied out death row when he commuted all of the inmates with death sentences in the state to life in prison without parole.

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