Tennessee Death Penalty News

Started by Jeff1857, April 10, 2008, 02:24:02 AM

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v1976ra

Tennessee, please don't forget Donald Strouth. The POS violently murdered someone in a robbery in 1978, and has been on DR ever since. He's claimed for years to be a "changed" man, yet those changes still haven't brought his victim back. Unfortunately, he seems destined to die on DR, rather than in the execution chamber.  >:(

Anne

http://www.theleafchronicle.com/article/20100527/OPINION01/5270317

Don't delay justice

May 27, 2010

The Tennessee Supreme Court has set an execution date for a death row inmate; it may schedule three more yet this year. If the sentences actually are carried out, it would be the first time the state has executed that many inmates in a 12-month period during the past half-century.

Incredibly, all four were convicted in the 1980s. They've lived decades longer than their victims and, in some cases, longer than the loved ones or friends of the victims who had hoped to see the sentences carried out.

We have long said that the death penalty needs to be applied in a more timely fashion, or else, Tennessee should not have capital punishment on the books at all.

The state currently has 89 inmates awaiting execution. Its death row is the 10th largest in the country. Nearly 40 percent of those death row inmates have been there at least 20 years.

Knoxville prosecutor Randy Nichols, who won one of the state's first capital convictions after the death penalty was reinstated in 1977, told The Tennessean that the legal process allows expensive appeals to draw out for too long. "It has an effect on victims," Nichols said. "They ask, 'Why has it been like this?' It's impossible to explain that."

Those who work on behalf of death row inmates say that the defendants in capital punishment trials often do not receive an adequate defense. In the past 13 years, more than 100 inmates on death row received legal relief because of constitutional violations or mistakes at their trials. A quarter of those had convictions or sentences overturned because of what was deemed to be inadequate legal representation.

One suggestion is that the state provide more resources for defense counselors on the front end of trials so that the state doesn't ultimately have to pay in near-endless appeals on the back end. That may be necessary so that defendants are ensured fairer trials -- no one wants to see a truly innocent person railroaded -- and so that justice is carried out in a swifter manner on behalf of victims.

A legal maxim often attributed to William E. Gladstone states that "Justice delayed is justice denied." The state of Tennessee, representing the will of its citizens, has determined that capital punishment should be one of the tools in its justice arsenal. Delaying executions for decades denies justice and further victimizes those who suffered so much in the first place.










Anne

heidi salazar

New Law Makes Killing Of Pregnant Woman Aggravating Factor In Death Penalty Consideration

New legislation co-sponsored by state Rep. Kent Coleman to toughen the penalties on those committing the most heinous crimes came into effect this month.

The law, HB2693, makes the murder of a pregnant woman an aggravating factor in the consideration of the death penalty in first-degree murder cases.

Rep. Coleman is the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, which has jurisdiction over civil and criminal law in the state, as well as law enforcement agencies and individual property rights.

"We have the death penalty in place in Tennessee to punish those who commit the most unforgivable crimes in our society," Rep. Coleman stated. "The taking of two lives, one yet unborn, is without a doubt a truly unconscionable and unpardonable act."

http://www.chattanoogan.com/articles/article_180938.asp

Granny B


New Law Makes Killing Of Pregnant Woman Aggravating Factor In Death Penalty Consideration

New legislation co-sponsored by state Rep. Kent Coleman to toughen the penalties on those committing the most heinous crimes came into effect this month.

The law, HB2693, makes the murder of a pregnant woman an aggravating factor in the consideration of the death penalty in first-degree murder cases.

Rep. Coleman is the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, which has jurisdiction over civil and criminal law in the state, as well as law enforcement agencies and individual property rights.

"We have the death penalty in place in Tennessee to punish those who commit the most unforgivable crimes in our society," Rep. Coleman stated. "The taking of two lives, one yet unborn, is without a doubt a truly unconscionable and unpardonable act."

http://www.chattanoogan.com/articles/article_180938.asp


Thank GOD! :-*
" Closure? Closure is a misused word in the English language.  There is no such thing as closure for the family of a murder victim.  There will never be any closure for the death of our loved ones until we are dead ourselves.  The families have a lifetime sentence of anguish and sadness." 
Susan Levy

Michael

New Lethal Injection Plan May Be Needed

awmakers are asking the Department of Correction to come up with a plan if lethal injection isn't an option due to a shortage of one of the drugs used.

As of Wednesday morning, there were three death row inmates scheduled to die by lethal injection: kidnapper and killer Steven West on Nov. 9, child rapist and murderer Billy Irick on Dec. 9 and killer Edward Harbison on Feb. 15.

However, the state of Tennessee has enough lethal injection for just one execution because one of the three drugs is not being manufactured right now. The company that makes it said it hopes to have it ready by winter 2011 but has not filled some back orders dating back to February.

Sen. Jim Tracy, who sits on the Prison Oversight Committee, said the state has the ability to switch the lethal injection protocol without changing the law.

The Tennessee Department of Correction provides no hints at what it will do. The department told Channel 4 News on Wednesday "there is no news."

If Tennessee attempts to change lethal injection drugs, there are possible legal challenges and delays that could last longer than the drug shortage.

Kentucky said it hopes the drug becomes available by March. To go through all the legal hoops to change protocol would take some time. Some executions will be postponed in Kentucky.

http://www.wsmv.com/news/25026208/detail.html
Im not sure if theres a hell, but I believe in executed murderers.

v1976ra




Sen. Jim Tracy, who sits on the Prison Oversight Committee, said the state has the ability to switch the lethal injection protocol without changing the law.





Good luck with that, sir! DR inmates and their lawyers will file petitions and challenge the 'Constitutionality' of changing the protocol. Could go on for months or years.  ::)


Quote


If Tennessee attempts to change lethal injection drugs, there are possible legal challenges and delays that could last longer than the drug shortage.




As I said. Why even think about making such a bold move now when they've already scheduled executions in the coming months.  ::)


Angelstorm

I read it as they're trying to bring in an extra option for once they've used the dose of Na Thio that they have on hand - so that all 3 executions can still go ahead, not just 1..... or am I reading it wrong?   ???

RevKev

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/ap/nation/7316313.html


Tennessee Supreme Court halts next 4 executions
By LUCAS L. JOHNSON II Associated Press 2010 The Associated Press
Nov. 29, 2010, 5:55PM
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- The Tennessee Supreme Court on Monday halted the executions of four death row inmates to allow a lower court to examine the constitutionality of the state's new lethal injection procedure.

Convicted killer Stephen Michael West was set to die by lethal injection at 10 p.m. CST Tuesday for the 1986 stabbing deaths of Wanda Romines and her 15-year-old daughter Sheila Romines.

Earlier this month, the state's high court granted West a temporary stay so a lower court could hear evidence in his lawsuit claiming the first drug in Tennessee's three-drug lethal injection protocol does not adequately anesthetize prisoners, violating the constitutional ban on cruel and unusual punishment.

Davidson County Chancellor Claudia Bonnyman ruled last week that Tennessee's process "allows for death by suffocation while conscious."

Bonnyman said in her ruling that the 5 grams of sodium thiopental, the first drug meant to render the inmate unconscious, was insufficient. She said the state should adopt some method to determine whether the inmate was awake before being injected with the second drug, a paralyzing agent.

In response, the state added a procedure in which a prison warden will brush a hand over an inmate's eyelashes and gently shake the inmate to check for consciousness.

If the warden determines the inmate is unconscious after the first injection, he directs the executioner to administer the next two drugs. If the warden determines the inmate is still conscious, a second IV line will give a second dose of 5 grams of sodium thiopental.

The Tennessee Supreme Court approved the plans, but West's attorneys urged them on Friday to halt the execution because they say the state hasn't proven that the new procedure is constitutional.

"Defendants waited until the eve of the Thanksgiving holidays to spring a new protocol on the court and Mr. West with nothing to demonstrate its constitutionality," the attorneys said.

On Monday, the Tennessee Supreme Court reconsidered its action and granted West's request to test the constitutionality of the procedure in lower court.

Until the issue is resolved, the high court also stayed the executions of death row inmates Billy Ray Irick -- who was to be executed next month_ and Edmund Zagorski and Edward Jerome Harbison.

Parties in the West case are expected to submit arguments or evidence regarding the revised protocol and the trial court is expected to render a judgment within 90 days, according to the high court.

In 2001, West was hours away from death when a judge granted him a stay so he could pursue federal appeals, which he has since completed. Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen declined to intervene when West's attorneys asked for clemency, spokeswoman Lydia Lenker said.


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JTiscool

Before they abolish the death penalty, they need to consider abolishing murder as it's more unconstitutional and it's actually illegal.....oh wait  :o :o

Seriously, no one challenged the victim's execution  >:(
My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

Rick4404

It appears that the Tennessee Department of Corrections would be free to change any of the drugs used for a lethal injection without a change in the statute. However, it would require revisions to the state's execution protocol for administration of lethal injections.

Since the change of the execution protocol would be tenamount to changing an administrative regulation or rule, such a change before it takes place would have to be presented for a period of public comment. Most often, that involves the state holding either a single public information meeting or a series of public information meetings in order to receive comments and input from the public. Oftentimes, these public information meetings aren't generally widely attended. Interested persons also have the opportunity to submit written comments in lieu of attending a meeting on the subject.

leopard32

Quote "Bonnyman said in her ruling that the 5 grams of sodium thiopental, the first drug meant to render the inmate unconscious, was insufficient. She said the state should adopt some method to determine whether the inmate was awake before being injected with the second drug, a paralyzing agent."

Where do they get these people from? 5 grams of sodium thiopental is sufficient to kill without the other drugs. This is the amount that Ohio uses in its single drug protocol.

Angelstorm


Quote "Bonnyman said in her ruling that the 5 grams of sodium thiopental, the first drug meant to render the inmate unconscious, was insufficient. She said the state should adopt some method to determine whether the inmate was awake before being injected with the second drug, a paralyzing agent."

Where do they get these people from? 5 grams of sodium thiopental is sufficient to kill without the other drugs. This is the amount that Ohio uses in its single drug protocol.


Yup, precisely..... however I don't know about you, but I don't mind if they poke the inmate with sharp objects to make sure they're asleep before they inject the rest of the drugs?!   ???

Granny B



Quote "Bonnyman said in her ruling that the 5 grams of sodium thiopental, the first drug meant to render the inmate unconscious, was insufficient. She said the state should adopt some method to determine whether the inmate was awake before being injected with the second drug, a paralyzing agent."

Where do they get these people from? 5 grams of sodium thiopental is sufficient to kill without the other drugs. This is the amount that Ohio uses in its single drug protocol.


Yup, precisely..... however I don't know about you, but I don't mind if they poke the inmate with sharp objects to make sure they're asleep before they inject the rest of the drugs?!   ???


Like a knife through the heart? ;D
" Closure? Closure is a misused word in the English language.  There is no such thing as closure for the family of a murder victim.  There will never be any closure for the death of our loved ones until we are dead ourselves.  The families have a lifetime sentence of anguish and sadness." 
Susan Levy

Angelstorm




Quote "Bonnyman said in her ruling that the 5 grams of sodium thiopental, the first drug meant to render the inmate unconscious, was insufficient. She said the state should adopt some method to determine whether the inmate was awake before being injected with the second drug, a paralyzing agent."

Where do they get these people from? 5 grams of sodium thiopental is sufficient to kill without the other drugs. This is the amount that Ohio uses in its single drug protocol.


Yup, precisely..... however I don't know about you, but I don't mind if they poke the inmate with sharp objects to make sure they're asleep before they inject the rest of the drugs?!   ???


Like a knife through the heart? ;D


Yup, that'll do it!   8)

Russki

I have to say that I always thought it strange that the 3 drug protocol came into being in the first place. Large doses of drug No 1 is all that is required. I suspect the protocol began to speed up the X. Perhaps they were worried that the witnesses might get bored?
Frenchy
Bombs do not choose. They will hit everything   ... Nikita Khrushchev

I once said, "We will bury you," and I got into trouble with it. Of course we will not bury you with a shovel. Your own working class will bury you.  ... Nikita Khrushchev

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