Pennsylvania Death Penalty News

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turboprinz

Corbett Signs Five Execution Warrants
They are the 44th, 45th, 46th, 47th and 48th execution warrants Corbett has signed since taking office.

January 14, 2015

Gov. Tom Corbett on Tuesday signed execution warrants for five convicted murders.

They are the 44th, 45th, 46th, 47th and 48th execution warrants Corbett has signed since taking office, the Governor's Office said.

According to the Governor's Office, the five men for whom Corbett signed execution warrants are:

Terrance Williams, who was convicted in Philadelphia County Court of first-degree murder for the beating death of Amos Norwood during a robbery on June 11, 1984.

Kenneth Hairston, who was convicted in Allegheny County Court of two counts of first-degree murder for beating to death with a sledgehammer his wife, Katherine, and their teenage autistic son, Sean, on June 11, 2001.

Alfonso Sanchez, who was convicted in Bucks County Court of two counts of first-degree murder for the shooting deaths of Lisa Diaz and Mendez Thomas on Oct. 16, 2007. Sanchez received a death sentence for the murder of Ms. Diaz and a life sentence for the murder of Mr. Thomas.

Robert Diamond, who was convicted in Bucks County Court of two counts of first-degree murder for the shooting deaths of Angel Guadalupe and Reginald Woodson Aug. 1, 2008.

Kevin Mattison, who was convicted in York County Court of first-degree murder for the shooting death of Christian Agosto during a robbery on Dec. 9, 2008.

Pennsylvania executes people by lethal injection. Though Corbett has signed 48 execution warrants while in office, Pennsylvania has not executed anyone since 1999, the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections said, when Gary Heidnik was executed for the murders of Deborah Dudley and Sandra Lindsay. Heidnik is one of only three people executed in Pennsylvania since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty in 1976.

http://patch.com/pennsylvania/phoenixville/corbett-signs-five-execution-warrants-0
I apologize for my not perfect English. Hopefully you understand what I mean. If not - ask me. I will try to explain.

phlebbb

#61
January 15, 2015, 10:48:25 PM Last Edit: February 14, 2015, 01:48:53 AM by phlebbb

Corbett Signs Five Execution Warrants
They are the 44th, 45th, 46th, 47th and 48th execution warrants Corbett has signed since taking office.

January 14, 2015

Gov. Tom Corbett on Tuesday signed execution warrants for five convicted murders.

They are the 44th, 45th, 46th, 47th and 48th execution warrants Corbett has signed since taking office, the Governor's Office said.

According to the Governor's Office, the five men for whom Corbett signed execution warrants are:

Terrance Williams, who was convicted in Philadelphia County Court of first-degree murder for the beating death of Amos Norwood during a robbery on June 11, 1984.

Kenneth Hairston, who was convicted in Allegheny County Court of two counts of first-degree murder for beating to death with a sledgehammer his wife, Katherine, and their teenage autistic son, Sean, on June 11, 2001.

Alfonso Sanchez, who was convicted in Bucks County Court of two counts of first-degree murder for the shooting deaths of Lisa Diaz and Mendez Thomas on Oct. 16, 2007. Sanchez received a death sentence for the murder of Ms. Diaz and a life sentence for the murder of Mr. Thomas.

Robert Diamond, who was convicted in Bucks County Court of two counts of first-degree murder for the shooting deaths of Angel Guadalupe and Reginald Woodson Aug. 1, 2008.

Kevin Mattison, who was convicted in York County Court of first-degree murder for the shooting death of Christian Agosto during a robbery on Dec. 9, 2008.

Pennsylvania executes people by lethal injection. Though Corbett has signed 48 execution warrants while in office, Pennsylvania has not executed anyone since 1999, the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections said, when Gary Heidnik was executed for the murders of Deborah Dudley and Sandra Lindsay. Heidnik is one of only three people executed in Pennsylvania since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty in 1976.

http://patch.com/pennsylvania/phoenixville/corbett-signs-five-execution-warrants-0



48 warrants signed and still all 48 condemned prisoners are still above ground or not cremated??If your not going to use the damn thing, why bother to sentence these mutts to death ??The only way to get off death row in Pa. is by natural causes, because, the state sure as hell isn't going to execute anybody.... >:( >:( >:(
People that think they know it all, annoy the hell out us who actually do ...

Grinning Grim Reaper

Gov. Tom Wolf declares moratorium on death penalty in Pa.

;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

Wallace McKelvey

February 13, 2015 at 11:23 AM

Gov. Tom Wolf declared a moratorium Friday on the death penalty in Pennsylvania, potentially halting the process for 186 prisoners who've received a death sentence.

Since 1693, the commonwealth has executed 1,043 prisoners, the last of which was Philadelphia torture killer Gary Heidnik in 1999. That execution took place, in large part, because Heidnik gave up his right to appeal.

In a statement released Friday, Wolf said the state's current death penalty is "a flawed system that has been proven to be an endless cycle of court proceedings as well as ineffective, unjust and expensive."

The death penalty has often been criticized for the costly, protracted appeals process that the sentence sets in motion.

Wolf's first action was a temporary reprieve to Terrance Williams, who was scheduled to be executed on March 4. Williams was convicted of two murders he committed as a teenager in 1984.

"Today's action comes after significant consideration and reflection," Wolf said. "This moratorium is in no way an expression of sympathy for the guilty on death row, all of whom have been convicted of committing heinous crimes."

Shortly after Wolf's announcement, Sen. Daylin Leach, D-Montgomery, said he reintroduced his bill Friday to abolish the death penalty altogether.

"I am extremely grateful that our governor will stop spending our tax dollars to, in the words of former US Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun, tinker with the machinery of death," he said, in a written statement.

www.pennlive.com

Moratorium?  What do they call three executions, all volunteers, in 40 years...KILL HAPPY?
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

Londoner77

Seriously??????

I'm sure we can't wait to see the flood of executions there being stopped!!!!!

Surely in order to have a moratorium you must have some sort of record of actually carrying out the sentences.

The only thing more laughable and pointless will be when the moratorium is 'lifted'

Grinning Grim Reaper

DA Seth Williams Challenges Gov. Wolf's Death Penalty Moratorium


February 18, 2015

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) -- The top prosecutor in Pennsylvania's largest city is challenging Gov. Tom Wolf's death penalty moratorium, telling the state's highest court that the action was illegal and unconstitutional.

The lawsuit was filed Wednesday by Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams. It comes five days after Wolf said he would issue reprieves at least until he receives a report from a legislative commission that has been studying the issue since 2011.

The case raised in Williams' filing involves Terrance Williams, who was convicted of the 1984 robbing and fatal tire-iron beating of another man. Since then, his death sentence has been fought in state and federal courts.

Williams' execution had been scheduled for March 4.

But Pennsylvania inmates facing execution have routinely been able to win delays, with the state's last execution carried out in 1999.

www.cbsphilly3.com
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

ChevyWolken

In a statement released Friday, Wolf said the state's current death penalty is "a flawed system that has been proven to be an endless cycle of court proceedings as well as ineffective, unjust and expensive."

Then why not limiting the endless appeals and wait decades, I think any real doubt or new evidence will come up in 10 years or so, after that there should be a X asap    >:(   
Born in Berlin, American at heart

Angelstorms OL'Man

I agree the state stalls and just don't have the balls to do it...Said it thousands of times Texas is the model state on how to run the Death Penalty...




In a statement released Friday, Wolf said the state's current death penalty is "a flawed system that has been proven to be an endless cycle of court proceedings as well as ineffective, unjust and expensive."

Then why not limiting the endless appeals and wait decades, I think any real doubt or new evidence will come up in 10 years or so, after that there should be a X asap    >:(   
This was designed to hurt....Its a SEAL Candace unless you have been there yo will never understand...

Grinning Grim Reaper

My Turn: Why Wolf's moratorium will fail


Posted: Monday, February 23, 2015 4:27 pm

John Morganelli 

Governor Tom Wolf did not impose a "moratorium" on Pennsylvania's death penalty. He has no such authority and he knows that. The governor was properly advised by Judge Timothy K. Lewis, former U.S. Court of Appeals Judge, that there exists no authority in the Office of Pennsylvania Governor to declare a moratorium or suspend the death penalty. What the governor did was to grant a "reprieve" to one death row inmate who was scheduled for an imminent execution. The granting of a "reprieve" is one of the governor's powers with respect to clemency in Article IV, Section 9(a) of the Pennsylvania Constitution. The other two are the power to "commute" a death sentence to life and to grant a "pardon." The latter two, however, cannot be exercised by the governor unless recommended by the Pennsylvania Board of Pardons. With respect to commuting a death sentence to life, the recommendation must be unanimous.
 
Under Pennsylvania law, the issuance of execution warrants by the executive branch is a mandatory duty. That precedent was established in Morganelli v. Casey, a case I brought in 1994 against then-governor Robert Casey. Today, the governor is given 90 days to sign a death warrant after receiving the case from the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. If the governor does not sign the execution warrant, the execution date must be set by the Department of Corrections and the execution proceeds without the governor's signature.

Accordingly, Judge Lewis advised the governor that executions must proceed and that the use of the "reprieve" power was the only constitutional basis for creating a "defacto" moratorium. The governor has stated that he will grant "reprieves" for subsequent scheduled executions for each death row inmate at least until the release of an impending study being done by a task force established by the legislature.

The governor's objective is unlikely to succeed. In Morganelli v. Casey, the court held that a "reprieve" exists only to afford an individual defendant the opportunity to temporarily postpone an execution for a particular proceeding involving that defendant -- i.e. a pending application for a pardon, commutation or judicial relief. It is unlikely that a court will allow a governor to grant "reprieves" based on a governor's concern about the fairness of the process or the release of a report that has no legal significance. If this was permitted, it would in effect allow a governor to commute death sentences to life bypassing The Board of Pardons in contravention of Article IV of the Pennsylvania Constitution. Only the legislature has the power to repeal the death penalty and only the judiciary has the power to suspend the death penalty or declare it null and void as unconstitutional or in violation of due process.

Pennsylvania's death penalty was deemed constitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court many years ago in the case of Blystone, and, therefore, the governor will not be able to derail Pennsylvania's death penalty by continuously granting "reprieves" in individual cases. As someone who has personally litigated these issues, I predict that ultimately the Pennsylvania Supreme Court will find the governor's action outside of the intended purpose and scope of a "reprieve."

John M. Morganelli, is the District Attorney of Northampton County. He is a past president of the Pennsylvania District Attorney's Association and in 1994 successfully prosecuted an unprecedented case against the Governor of Pennsylvania to enforce Pennsylvania's death penalty.

www.dailyitem.com
Vengence is mine saith the Lord...who are we to question the instruments used to carry it out?

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