New Mexico Death Penalty News

Started by Jeff1857, March 11, 2008, 02:15:43 AM

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Jeff1857

March 11, 2008, 02:15:43 AM Last Edit: May 24, 2008, 04:37:18 AM by Jeff1857
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -- The death penalty will be debated this week in an Albuquerque court room.

Two years ago, Bernalillo County Sheriff's Deputy James McGrane was shot to death in the east mountains.

The man accused of that crime, Michael Paul Astorga, is still waiting to be tried. He pleaded not guilty to murder charges.

His lawyers and prosecutors agree about one thing: before they can even argue about Astorga's guilt or innocence, the need to settle a question about the constitutionality of New Mexico's death penalty law.

The district attorney wants to ask potential jurors about the death penalty. That is the punishment prosecutors want to pursue if Astorga is convicted of killing McGrane.

Astorga's lawyers say that studies show jurors willing to hand out the death penalty are predisposed to finding a defendant guilty. Therefore, it's not fair to ask the question.

In the first day of proceedings Monday, retired lawyer Marcia Wilson told the judge that she'd made a study of death penalty cases in New Mexico for a Bar Association project in 2000, then expanded it as an avocation over the years.

Defense attorney Gary Mitchell presented his analysis of Wilson's data.

"If the victim is white, we give the death penalty far more often and a higher percentage if the victim is white than we do if the victim is Hispanic, African-American or Asian or Native American," Mitchell said, adding that Astorga would not get a fair trial if the death penalty is in effect when his trial gets underway.

But later under cross-examination, Wilson admitted that it was not a scientific study and it had not been subject to any kind of academic review.

Prosecutors went on to point out that several notorious death penalty cases were either misrepresented in Wilson's database or missing entirely.

Both the prosecution and defense are expected to call several expert witnesses. The hearing could last all week.

Judge Candelaria will preside over the case. Whatever the judge rules is expected to be challenged in New Mexico's Supreme Court.

The actual murder trial may not begin until this summer.

JeffB

Lawmakers tackle death penalty bill

Posted at: 01/27/2009 6:23 PM

Updated at: 01/27/2009 6:35 PM

By: Eyewitness News 4

The crusade to get rid of New Mexico's death penalty returned to the State Capitol Tuesday.
The drive to dump the death penalty usually employs lofty arguments about justice, theology, and philosophy but this year, money will likely to dominate the conversation.

Death penalty opponents say they're likely to win some votes from lawmakers worried about the state's financial crisis because death penalty trials and years of automatic appeals are notoriously expensive.

But still at the heart of the great debate is the question about how anyone can be absolutely sure the state is killing the right guy.

"If there is room for error, putting people in prison for the rest of their natural lives protects society and allows us to rectify a mistake, and we do want to be sure that the people we convict are the ones that actually committed the crime," said Representative Gail Chasey of Albuquerque.

Supporters of the death penalty will argue that it's a deterrent to cold-blooded murder and that those who commit such killings deserve to be killed.

The only execution in New Mexico in the last 48 years was a child-raping murderer named Terry Clark back in 2001.

The current bill would replace the death penalty with a life in prison sentence with no hope of parole.

New Mexico currently has two convicts on death row.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Death penalty opponents say they're likely to win some votes from lawmakers worried about the state's financial crisis because death penalty trials and years of automatic appeals are notoriously expensive.


I get tired of the argument about the expense of prosecuting capital offenders.  Hell, I'll kick in a few extra bucks in taxes if they need it... 


"SO SUCK IT YOU "BLUE COOLER" DOPE!"  -  Sylar24

JT

New Mexico effectively doesn't have a death penalty, anyway.
JT's Ridiculous Quote of the Century:
"I'm disgusted with the State for even putting me in this position."
-- Reginald Blanton, Texas death row.  As of October 27, 2009, Reggie's position has been in a coffin.

JeffB

JANUARY 29, 2009:



NEW MEXICO:

House committee approves death penalty repeal


A bill to abolish the death penalty in New Mexico wins the approval of a House committee.

The legislation would provide instead for life in prison without the possibility of parole.

It passed the House Consumer and Public Affairs Committee on a 5-2 vote, with Democrats voting for it and Republicans against it.

The bill would have to clear another House panel, the Judiciary Committee, before it reached the full House for a vote.

The House has twice before passed similar legislation, but those bills could not get approval in the Senate.

(source: Associated Press)

"SO SUCK IT YOU "BLUE COOLER" DOPE!"  -  Sylar24

JT

Gov. Bill Richardson is, by his own admission, a death penalty supporter; I would anticipate that he would veto any such Bill.  As this Bill has only won narrow support in the House, and has never been passed in the Senate, it's unlikely it would win a majority sufficient to override a gubernatorial veto.
JT's Ridiculous Quote of the Century:
"I'm disgusted with the State for even putting me in this position."
-- Reginald Blanton, Texas death row.  As of October 27, 2009, Reggie's position has been in a coffin.

Michael

New Mexicans gather to support repealing death penalty

The Roundhouse was filled with shouts of "Governor! Governor!" as an exuberant crowd cheered Gov. Bill Richardson's support of their cause.

About 150 people gathered on Monday to convince New Mexico legislators to repeal the death penalty in New Mexico.

The New Mexico Coalition to Repeal the Death Penalty hosted the rally in Santa Fe on Monday.

"I am preaching to the choir, but there is a man I know who has discernment on this issue: (the) governor," said Allen Sanchez of the New Mexico Catholic Bishops.

House Bill 285, introduced by Representative Gail Chasey, proposes abolishing the death penalty and replacing it with the sentence of life imprisonment without possibility of release or parole. The bill will be voted on during this legislative session.

Death row exonerees and family members of murder victims also spoke at the rally.

Juan Melendez, a native New Mexican, said he spent nearly 20 years on death row and wants to ensure that no one else has to go through that torment.

"I spent 17 years, eight months and one day on death row for a crime I didn't commit, and it was terrible for me," he said.

Melendez was released from death row in 2002, becoming the 99th death row prisoner to be exonerated in the United States since 1973.

Ray Krone, who was the 100th exoneree, said it's important to overcome legal mistakes that can lead to wrongful imprisonment on death row.

"There are reasons these things happen: discrimination, faulty investigation, poor representation," he said. "You can never release an innocent man from the grave."

Michelle Ginger, a member of Murder Victims' Families for Reconciliation, said her father was shot in Santa Rosa but that she does not want revenge, though most people expect her to.

"It seems like a no-brainer that you don't teach people that killing is the wrong thing to do by killing someone," she said. "If you've ever lived through this, why would you ever want to do that to someone else?"

http://media.www.dailylobo.com/media/storage/paper344/news/2009/02/10/News/New-Mexicans.Gather.To.Support.Repealing.Death.Penalty-3621521.shtml
I´m not sure if there´s a hell, but I believe in executed murderers.

Granny B


Gov. Bill Richardson is, by his own admission, a death penalty supporter; I would anticipate that he would veto any such Bill.  As this Bill has only won narrow support in the House, and has never been passed in the Senate, it's unlikely it would win a majority sufficient to override a gubernatorial veto.


Supports death penalty: zero tolerance for heinous crimes

I am in favor of NM's death penalty law. It sends a strong message of zero tolerance for heinous crimes, and it provides certain justice for the victim's families.
At the same time, we must ensure that capital punishment is applied equally, without regard for race or economic status, & we must work to apply DNA testing to make sure only the guilty are executed.

I support the proposal to make the murder of a child under 11 years old an "aggravating circumstance" and eligible for the death penalty.

Source: Campaign web site, RichardsonForGovernor.com, "Priorities" Oct 24, 2002
________________________________________________
Well, knock me over with a feather!  I thought he was a dp opponent, till I looked it up.
________________________________________________

Domestic violence incidents start with drinking
Our problems with alcohol abuse aren't limited to DWI.


Experts report the majority of domestic violence incidents start with, or are exacerbated by drinking. That's why my proposals incorporate domestic violence into increased training for law enforcement officers, tougher penalties for offenders, and increasing treatment options to deal with the underlying problems. I also want to amend our stalking and harassment laws to prohibit electronic, or "cyber" stalking.
Source: State of the State speech to the New Mexico Legislature Jan 20, 2004
________________________________________________

But he is off base with this one.  You sober up an abuser and what you have is a sober abuser who is pissed off for being sober.
________________________________________________

Voted NO on maintaining right of habeas corpus in Death Penalty Appeals.

Vote on an amendment to delete provisions in the bill that would make it harder for prisoners who have been given the death penalty in state courts to appeal the decision on constitutional grounds in the federal courts ['Habeas Corpus'].
Bill HR 2703 ; vote number 1996-64 on Mar 14, 1996

Voted YES on making federal death penalty appeals harder.

Vote on a bill to make it harder for prisoners who have been given the death penalty in state courts to appeal the decision on constitutional grounds in the federal courts.
Bill HR 729 ; vote number 1995-109 on Feb 8, 1995

Voted NO on replacing death penalty with life imprisonment.

Amendment to replace death penalty crimes in the 1994 Omnibus Crime Bill with life imprisonment.
Bill HR 4092 ; vote number 1994-107 on Apr 14, 1994

" Closure? Closure is a misused word in the English language.  There is no such thing as closure for the family of a murder victim.  There will never be any closure for the death of our loved ones until we are dead ourselves.  The families have a lifetime sentence of anguish and sadness." 
Susan Levy

Granny B

State of New Mexico
Office of the Governor
Bill Richardson News Release
Governor

For Immediate Release Contact: Pahl Shipley
April 4, 2006 (505) 476-2202

Governor Bill Richardson Urges DA to Pursue Death
Penalty for Deputy Murder

SANTA FE- Governor Bill Richardson today urged Bernalillo County District Attorney Kari Brandenburg to pursue the death penalty in the case of Michael Paul Astorga, the
man police believe shot and killed Bernalillo County Sheriff's Deputy James McGrane, Jr. during a traffic stop March 22.

"I believe that a conviction for this crime - the cold blooded murder of a police officer doing his duty- would call for the ultimate punishment," said Governor Richardson. "In rare situations, the death penalty is the appropriate penalty. This is one of those cases."

Astorga had apparently fled to Juarez, Mexico where early Monday he was arrested by the Chihuahua State Judicial Police. Monday morning Governor Richardson had
numerous conversations with high ranking Mexican officials asking for their help in returning Astorga to the United States as quickly as possible. Last evening federal and state officials in Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico decided to deport Astorga and early this morning turned him over to U.S. officials at the border in El Paso.

"I am grateful to the Mexican authorities for their cooperation and quick action returning Astorga to the United States," added the Governor.

This morning Governor Richardson called Texas Governor Rick Perry to ask for his help in extraditing Astorga back to New Mexico and had state resources ready to expedite the process. That became unnecessary when Astorga waived extradition.

"The good news is a dangerous fugitive is off the streets. Now the priority is to get him to trial to answer these charges," said the Governor.

#30#
" Closure? Closure is a misused word in the English language.  There is no such thing as closure for the family of a murder victim.  There will never be any closure for the death of our loved ones until we are dead ourselves.  The families have a lifetime sentence of anguish and sadness." 
Susan Levy

Michael

Death penalty repeal heads to Judiciary panel

The bill that would abolish capital punishment in New Mexico cleared another hurdle Tuesday when it got a do-pass recommendation on a 5-2 party-line vote in the Senate Public Affairs Committee.

Senate Bill 285, sponsored by Rep. Gail Chasey, D-Albquerque, now goes to Senate Judiciary, which is considered the real test for the bill. In recent sessions, death-penalty abolition bills have died in Senate Judiciary.

Opponents of the bill outnumbered supporters at the meeting.

Only person spoke against the bill, District Attorney Janetta Hicks of the Fifth Judicial District. She noted that she represents the district in which the last person executed in New Mexico, Terry Clark, raped and murdered 9-year-old Dena Lynn Gore of Artesia. Clark was executed in 2001 for the 1986 crime.

David Keys, a professor of criminology at New Mexico State University, told the committee that even though there has only been one execution in New Mexico since 1960, taxpayers pay about $2.75 million a year for death-penalty cases. Most of that, he said, is for attorneys, psychiatrists and other court expenses.

In response to arguments that there would be similar expenses if the state creates the life-without-possibility-of-parole sentence, Keys said he would expect judges to keep appeals going for those receiving that sentence.

``If someone's life is on the line, it's different,'' he told a reporter before the hearing. ``When lives aren't in danger there's not the necessary vigilance you see in death-penalty cases.''

Keys also said capital punishment is no deterrent to crime. ``People in interrogation rooms know that only one percent of those convicted of first-degree murder are ever going to go to the death chamber,'' he said.

Even though it wasn't discussed at the committee hearing, senators last week received a letter from Ron Keine, who was sentenced to death in a sensational Albuquerque murder case in 1974.

``Although innocent, I was nearly executed,'' Keine wrote. ``I was pronounced guilty by 12 men and women who had no reasonable doubt in their mind that I committed a particularly brutal and atrocious murder of a 26-year-old man, William Velten. I am among the ranks of 130 exonerated men and women in the United States who were almost put to death in error.''

Keine is one of the four members of the California-based Vagos motorcycle gang who spent 22 months on death row. He and his co-defendants were freed only after the real murderer, Kerry Rodney Lee, confessed after a religious conversion. Keine and the other convicted Vagos members spent 22 months on death row until after Lee's confession. In a 2005 interview, Keine said he was close enough to being put in a gas chamber that an assistant warden came to talk to him about what he wanted for his last meal.

He's the last of the four convicted Vagos members still alive.

Keine, who lives in Sterling Heights, Mich. told a reporter Tuesday that he'd like to come to New Mexico to personally testify about his experience but can't because of economic reasons.

In the interview, Keine, who is a past chairman of the Clinton Township, Mich., Republican Party, said ``I'm disappointed that more Republicans haven't supported this bill.'' When the bill was debated in the House last month, four of the 25 House Republicans voted for it. But in committee votes in recent years, no Republican senators have voted to abolish the death penalty.

``Most of the 130 exonerees were not freed by the system, but in spite of it,'' Keine wrote in his letter to senators. ``They were saved by pure luck, usually when outside sources for one reason or another took up their plight.``

Voting in favor of the do-pass recommendation for SB285 were Sen. Mary Jane Garcia, D-Dona Ana; Sen. Cynthia Nava, D-Las Cruces; and Sens. Tim Eichenberg, Dede Feldman and Sen. Eric Griego, all Albuquerque Democrats.

Voting against the bill were Sen. Vern Asbill, R-Carlsbad, and Sen. Gay Kernan, R-Hobbs.

Absent from the meeting were Sens. Mark Boitano and George Munoz.

http://www.pntonline.com/news/death_16653___article.html/keine_bill.html
I´m not sure if there´s a hell, but I believe in executed murderers.

Michael

New Mexico's Gov to be honored at Colosseum

ROME (AP) -- The governor of the American state of New Mexico said Wednesday that the world is moving toward abolishing the death penalty and urged the United States to follow.

Gov. Bill Richardson was in Rome to take part in a ceremony at the Colosseum, which was lit Wednesday night to mark his decision to end the death penalty in New Mexico. Richardson also met with Pope Benedict XVI at the Vatican.

Richardson, a Democrat, signed a bill last month abolishing the death penalty for crimes committed after July 1, replacing it with life in prison without the possibility of parole.

"I didn't want America to continue being isolated with this position, because the world was moving in another direction," he said. "It's about time that America starts, along with the rest of the world, following in abolishing the death penalty."

He spoke at a news conference organized by the Sant'Egidio Community, an international lay organization of the Roman Catholic Church that opposes capital punishment.

New Mexico became the second state to ban executions since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty in 1976. New Jersey was the first, in 2007.

Richardson met with the pope at the end of Benedict's weekly general audience at the Vatican. He said the pontiff was informed of the bill and was "very positive, and thanked me for that." The Vatican opposes the death penalty.

The Colosseum has become a symbol of the global fight against capital punishment. Since 1999, the ancient Roman arena has been illuminated every time a death sentence is commuted somewhere in the world or a government abolishes capital punishment.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5igJXoa8_RHgcJUa-imLY7_czE39AD97J4R8O0
I´m not sure if there´s a hell, but I believe in executed murderers.

63Wildcat

How fitting... a ceremony in the Col0sseum, in which, there were more executions viewed by the public than in all of history.. how fitting that this idiot Gov. made his decision there. Oh and to meet with the Pope as well.....mmmmmmmmm....the Catholic Church... were some of the most brutal slaughters, and wars were planned by...go freakin figure..
"..the death of any public servant or innocent is a tragedy... the death of a murderer is a mere statistic..."  -63Wildcat

AS OF TOMORROW I'M TURNING GRAVITY OFF...

AnneTheBelgian

#11
January 15, 2011, 12:30:56 PM Last Edit: January 24, 2011, 08:32:27 PM by AnneTheBelgian
http://www.kob.com/article/stories/s1926384.shtml

(with video)

Death penalty supporters push to 'repeal the repeal'

Posted at: 01/14/2011 8:05 PM

By: Stuart Dyson

KOB Eyewitness News 4

New Mexico death penalty supporters plan to try to bring back capital punishment in the legislative session that starts next week. They've been working on "repealing the repeal" ever since the state did away with it two years ago, and now they are ready to put it on the agenda for the 60 day session.

Lawmakers are likely to see an attempt to bring back the death penalty as a legislative bill, and they will certainly see an effort to put it on the ballot in the 2012 general election as a constitutional amendment. That's the path favored by Rep. Dennis Kintigh, a Roswell Republican and retired FBI agent.

"There's a lot of good people on both sides of the issue," Kintigh said. "It's a fundamental issue of how we deal with this in society and I believe the best way to deal with these kinds of issues is to let the voters decide, give it to the voters."

But lawmakers around the state in both parties told Eyewitness News 4 it isn't one of their priorities for the session.

"We're facing a fiscal crisis," said Rep. Al Park, (D) Albuquerque. "We need to work on the economy, public schools. The state of New Mexico has only utilized the death penalty once in the last 50 years."

The state executed child-raping murderer Terry Clark with a lethal injection in 2001, the only execution since 1960.

Republican Rep. Larry Larranaga of Albuquerque agreed with Park - now is not the time to re-visit the issue.

"We have very pressing issues during this legislative session," Larranaga said. "There's the budget, education reform, we've got job creation, we have the economy to look at."

Governor Susana Martinez, a former prosecutor, has repeatedly said she favors the death penalty and would sign legislation bringing it back, but Park and Larranaga, and other lawmakers said it won't get to her desk this year.

They pointed out that it takes a super-majority in the House and Senate to put a constitutional amendment on the ballot, and while the 2010 election put more conservatives in the House, the Senate was not on the ballot. Its political alignment is the same as it was in 2009, when the bill to repeal the death penalty passed by six votes.












Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

AnneTheBelgian

http://www.lcsun-news.com/las_cruces-news/ci_17183234

Bill to reinstate New Mexico death penaly introduced (1 p.m.)

By Milan Simonich

Santa Fe Bureau

Posted: 01/24/2011 12:54:16 PM MST

SANTA FE - Rep. Dennis Kintigh today introduced a bill to reinstate the death penalty in New Mexico.

Kintigh, R-Roswell, proposes to put the issue in the public's hands through a ballot initiative. The Legislature would have to refer the measure to voters.

State legislators in 2009 outlawed death sentences and then-Gov. Bill Richardson signed the bill into law, though with some reluctance.

Republican Gov. Susana Martinez, who was a career prosecutor, last week said she wanted to reinstate the death penalty for the worst crimes.













Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

JTiscool

My reason for supporting the death penalty? A murderer has less of a right to live than his victim and already presents a danger while incarcerated for life. They have nothing to lose when the most they can get is Life in prison without parole.

AnneTheBelgian

http://www.currentargus.com/ci_17188392

Martinez begins push to restore death penalty

From the Current-Argus

Posted: 01/24/2011 10:12:35 PM MST

By Milan Simonich

Santa Fe Bureau

SANTA FE -- Ronald Keine, who spent 22 months on New Mexico's Death Row before being exonerated of murdering a college student, said Monday that the new governor and legislators should stop trying to reinstate capital punishment.

"New Mexico had a bad system, a corrupt system," Keine, 63, said in a telephone interview from his home in Michigan. "It makes me nervous that they want to go back to something that did not work."

Legislators in 2009 repealed New Mexico's death penalty, but newly elected Republican Gov. Susana Martinez said she wants lawmakers to reverse that decision so that juries have the option of choosing capital punishment for the worst criminals.

State Rep. Dennis Kintigh, a retired FBI agent, shares Martinez's opinion that the death penalty should be on the books. But he is at cross-purposes with the Martinez on how to go about it.

Kintigh, R-Roswell, introduced a bill Monday that calls on legislators to let the public decide the issue by referendum. His proposal, House Joint Resolution 6, would require a two-thirds vote from the House and the Senate to be placed on the 2012 general election ballot.

Kintigh said letting the public vote on the death penalty would end debates in the Legislature each time power shifts from one party to the other.

Martinez, a career prosecutor before becoming governor, does not favor a vote on capital punishment by the citizenry.

"The governor supports reinstating the death penalty and believes this can be best accomplished through a statutory change," her spokesman said Monday.

Gary Mitchell, a Ruidoso lawyer who has handled more than 50 death-penalty cases across a 30-year career, said Martinez had embraced the issue "for political reasons."

"It's a shame because Susana had a good soul as a district attorney. She did not seek the death penalty because she knew how costly and ineffective it was," Mitchell said. "This is a just political stunt designed to appease people."

In her State of the State speech last week, Martinez said she believed in the death penalty as an important tool in fighting crime and sending a message that the worst criminals deserve the ultimate punishment.

"When a monster rapes and murders a child or a criminal kills a police officer, the death penalty should be an option for the jury," she said.

Mitchell said New Mexico juries are the best evidence that the state's residents do not favor capital punishment. Rarely have they imposed death sentences, and the state has executed only two people in the last 50 years

The most recent inmate put to death was Terry Clark in 2001. Convicted of killing 9-year-old Dena Lynn Gore of Artesia in 1986, Clark dropped his appeals.

Until Clark, New Mexico had not executed anyone since 1960.

Keine was 26 when he and three friends were convicted of murder in Bernalillo County and sent to death row in 1974.

"We were like the poster boys for the death penalty," Keine said Monday. "We were dirty bikers with long hair and colors on our back, riding choppers."

He said they also were innocent, framed by sheriff's officers intent on solving the murder of William Venten, a student at the University of New Mexico.

"Jurors figured that, because the police arrested us and put us in jail, we must have been guilty," Keine said.

The real killer of Venten stepped forward in 1975 after say he had a religious conversion. He produced the murder weapon and detailed the crime.

Then-District Attorney James Brandenburg of Albuquerque said he was not convinced by the new evidence, insisting that Keine and the others were guilty.

The case against Keine and his three co-defendants finally collapsed in 1976.

They went free after the only purported witness, a motel maid said, she had concocted a story about seeing them commit the murder. She told the Detroit News that she made up the story in hopes of ingratiating herself with people in law enforcement. She wanted them to let her boyfriend out of prison.

Keine said he works as a plumber and is active in a project called Witness to Innocence. The other three men who were on death row with him -- Thomas Gladish, Richard Greer and Clarence Smith -- died after being freed.

Kintigh said the justice system is better now than when New Mexico's most famous wrongful conviction occurred. Defense lawyers, he said, are more aggressive and determined to make the government prove its case.

Kintigh said he supports capital punishment because of his own involvement in "a monstrous case."

As an FBI agent, he investigated a drug gang that stormed a house in Lovington, terrified four children under the age of 9, then murdered a man and his 16-year-old son.

Prosecuted by the federal government, it began as a death-penalty case but was reduced in a 2005 plea bargain to life without parole. Kintigh said justice was not done because the killers deserved death.

Though New Mexico abolished its death penalty in 2009, Robert Fry of Farmington and Timothy Allen of Bloomfield remain on death row. They were sentenced before the law was changed.













Anne
"DEATH PENALTY OPPONENTS WHO TWIST THE TRUTH TO PROTECT KILLERS ARE ALSO TORTURING VICTIMS FAMILIES" (PETER BRONSON, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER,FEBRUARY 3, 2003)

PRO DEATH PENALTY AND PROUD OF IT !!!

JE MAINTIENDRAI (MOTTO OF WILLIAM I THE SILENT, PRINCE OF ORANGE, 1533 - 1584, MOTTO OF THE NETHERLANDS)

DEO JUVANTE (MOTTO OF THE PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO)

PROUD TO BE BELGIAN !!! I LOVE MY KINGDOM !!!

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